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post #21 of 173 Old 09-15-2019
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Re: Sailing as a senior

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I will be using this excellent quote, I hope you don't mind!
Mind? Hell Iím flattered!
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post #22 of 173 Old 09-15-2019 Thread Starter
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Re: Sailing as a senior

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.

Dancing has never been my thing (to do or watch). Physically I put it in the same bucket as golf. All the twisting, torquing and making one's body do things that aren't natural, really isn't very good for the pros.

Amen.
Interesting comment! I was not a big sports kid... of course I played little league and know every batting average of the Yanks back then. I was shy and so dancing with girls was not my thing.

In college I did no sports except tennis... Never was a person to watch sports on TV after high school. We had a hoop on our garage. We went to games at Ebbets, Polo Grounds and the old Yankee Stadium. It was fun! I caught a foul ball!

Years later in my late 30s almost 40 when I bought Shiva I was in Norwalk working on the boat... and I went to a bar for a burger. They had a basketball game on the TV.. no sound. I recognized nothing... didn't know whether it was college of pro or what. It was just a generic game to me. I realized to be a fan you really need to invest watching time. Never ever ever read the sports page in the paper.

Lived in the village and had an opportunity for all sorts of cultah... visited museum, shows, concerts. Had some lady friends who were studying and loved dance. Went a few times.

Returning from 4 years of living aboard in the tropics I was thirsty for high culture. I began to attend opera and ballet which I essentially knew nothing about. I enjoyed the immersion into these old art forms... preserved as paintings in a museum from the 18th and 19th centuries. I began to appreciate the skill of these artists... their lifetime of training and achievement. Ballet dancers were even more fit and in control of their bodies than athletes. The movement was so graceful and studied. The structure of ballet reminded me of the "rules" of classical architecture with its orders. Ballet / dance was to walking what sailing was to messing about in the water at the beach. I believe Goethe called architecture frozen music.... I called dance flowing architecture. I find inspiration watching ballet. I love to see an inspiring performance and then go to the boat and sail.

For me sailing like ballet doesn't work to watch it on a screen. It's live thing... a passing thing... once you do "a sail" it is gone and only a memory. We return to sailing again live because of the thrill we get. Performances are like that as well... or should be and can be.

I find many forms of dance interesting to watch now... dance, like sailing/the sea is part of so many cultures. But it's hard to monetize the experience despite that someone will / has done it.

Nothing in life is free.
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pay attention... someone's life depends on it

Last edited by SanderO; 09-16-2019 at 09:37 PM.
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post #23 of 173 Old 09-15-2019
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Re: Sailing as a senior

Somebody I know used to sail on a boat which was really big and had everything hydraulic. He and his wife sailed everywhere with this thing. I guess it's key to have a lot more automatic.
It was a boat like this one: ww.sailingyacht-aline.com/world-cruiser

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post #24 of 173 Old 09-15-2019
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Re: Sailing as a senior

Seems to me that sailing is something most of us can do well into old age, even when injury or muscle loss takes the edge off tennis, windsurfing and the Ironman.

I turned 76 in this video.

https://youtu.be/z5m9yT06Khg
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Last edited by Christian Williams; 09-15-2019 at 01:30 PM.
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post #25 of 173 Old 09-15-2019 Thread Starter
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Re: Sailing as a senior

I feel comfortable in most "reasonable" conditions as a senior. This has made me more of a fair weather sailor. With a heeled boat and seas running going forward is way more difficult as a senior with my balance deficit from nerve damage during spine surgery. Steadiness, sure footedness is required. Moving down below in a heeled boat is not a problem because of the hand holds.

Two years were were coming back from a nice sail with a mile to go to the inner harbor where I drop the sail. A very very dark sky was coming right at us and I was pretty sure we see very strong wings in a brief squall. I expected a lee shore.... fired up the engine, rolled in the genny and went forward to muscle down the sail. Got it down just before the sky opened up. Zero visibility. Tying the main is not something I want to do ever and especially now on a pitching deck.

If you have sea room you can run until things calm down... Head up, release the main halyard, get it down quickly to the deepest reef and fall off and run with no genny. Coastal this is not always possible.

pay attention... someone's life depends on it
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post #26 of 173 Old 09-15-2019
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Re: Sailing as a senior

Furling mains, or maybe a Dutchman, are the designs of a senior qualified vessel.
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post #27 of 173 Old 09-15-2019 Thread Starter
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Re: Sailing as a senior

Minni, I've had the Dutchie since 1987 or 88 I was about 40.... not quite a senior ;-)

My main is like 450 SF, full battened and heavy dacron. PITA.
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post #28 of 173 Old 09-16-2019
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Re: Sailing as a senior

Making life easier aboard is the not the exclusive domain of the senior, it just becomes more necessary. Good you were ahead of the curve. No doubt it's one of the reasons you've kept her so long.

I'm thinking about whether I would want a Dutchman on a future boat. I like the system, especially the fact that one can retain a full battened, traditional main.

My only hesitation is whether the main would be too big to flake without the dutchman, which is the case now, with just my wife and me aboard. Any failure of our current furling system and the whole main must come down on deck and wait for calm conditions to correct. I can not flake it alone, while my wife is at the helm. The last time I did need to flake it and tie it to the boom, it took four of us. Two strapping 30 yr olds, plus me and my wife.

I've been thinking about boom furling the next go around, but they can fail too and can also be temperamental to furl. If the boom is not at exactly the correct angle to the mast, it will start to extend, as it rolls, like a bad carpet roll, and jam.

I wonder if there is anyway to suggest whether boom furling or the dutchman would be more reliable. Everything fails eventually. The Dutchman might be easier to correct, if it does fail, in a remote place.


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post #29 of 173 Old 09-16-2019
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Re: Sailing as a senior

For kicks and giggles went to ballet school when doing med school. Fellow student/roommate explained the exercise of ballet was so intense that that many donít have their period. He thought is was the ideal group of ladies to date. He wrestled in college but I didnít do organize sports preferring long distance bike rides and rock/ice climbing. Still the ladies were amazingly fit, and quite intelligent. Unfortunately now canít watch ballet in comfort knowing how much pain, injury and wear it puts on a body.
Mom was an art historian. Wrote books, and was a professor. Ruined art for me. Spent much of my childhood being dragged around to museums. Only recently can go into a museum and enjoy it.

Thereís three ways to get old in my humble opinion.
The boomer fight - do everything possible to retard it. Weird diets and supplements. Train like youíre fighting for an Olympic spot. Dress like your 20 something.
Go gently into the night- focus on kids and grandkids. Reminisce about the past. Work your AARP card. Do herd activities. Cruises, tours, RV, red hat etc.
You get one pass- acknowledge the process. Figure out what you can/need to do to continue to be independent, self reliant and do what you want. Stay vigorous to the extent possible intellectually, physically and socially but be realistic to avoid injury. Enjoy the passage of the torch to descendants and the wonder of the circle of life.
Death and taxes. Get over it.

s/v Hippocampus
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post #30 of 173 Old 09-16-2019 Thread Starter
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Re: Sailing as a senior

[QUOTE=Minnewaska;2051626378]Making life easier aboard is the not the exclusive domain of the senior, it just becomes more necessary. Good you were ahead of the curve. No doubt it's one of the reasons you've kept her so long.

I'm thinking about whether I would want a Dutchman on a future boat. I like the system, especially the fact that one can retain a full battened, traditional main.

My only hesitation is whether the main would be too big to flake without the dutchman, which is the case now, with just my wife and me aboard. Any failure of our current furling system and the whole main must come down on deck and wait for calm conditions to correct. I can not flake it alone, while my wife is at the helm. The last time I did need to flake it and tie it to the boom, it took four of us. Two strapping 30 yr olds, plus me and my wife.

I've been thinking about boom furling the next go around, but they can fail too and can also be temperamental to furl. If the boom is not at exactly the correct angle to the mast, it will start to extend, as it rolls, like a bad carpet roll, and jam.

I wonder if there is anyway to suggest whether boom furling or the dutchman would be more reliable. Everything fails eventually. The Dutchman might be easier to correct, if it does fail, in a remote place.[/QUOTE

I have very very limited experience with other boats... raising, dropping, flacking, reefing and covering the main. So I can't compare one system to another. I can say this.

Dutchy is easy to repair and adjust... and inexpensive. Once the sail is "prepped"... the only fail would be the monofiliament.

Cisually you don't see it except from pretty close. Stack pack and lazy jacks you do.

Dutchy trains the sail to flake. It pretty much drops in correct flakes... All you do when it's down is:

Pull the leach aft a bit if necessary...
put on a few sail ties... not needed actually as the sail will not come off the boom. Ties permit a better fitting cover.

Cover needs to have slits and zips... no big deal... modify existing one.

Super for reefing as no sail spills onto the deck.

Our track has a bit too much friction so the weight of the sail will not drop it down onto the boom. A light breeze is a help.... more breeze helps more. Wife does forward and pulls the sail a bit and guides the flakes. Easy peasy but I don't let her go up there unless seas are calm... which means we do the drop clear of stink pots.

We have leach loaded full batts.... much easier to install than luff loaded ones.

No impact on sail shape or trim. Of course the sail maker has to properly install the grommets. Long foot means more lines. We had two we now have 3 with the last few mainsails.

Set it up and fiddle with lines etc. on calm day with main hoisted.

After than it's pretty bullet proof.

You can use single or double line reefing...

There are no noticeable chafe issues.

pay attention... someone's life depends on it
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