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post #41 of 173 Old 09-16-2019
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Re: Sailing as a senior

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Re: Sailing as a senior

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkofSeaLife View Post
Long Post so feel free to ignore.

As I get older I don't need rippling chest muscles or shoulder muscles but I do need rippling back, wrist and calf muscles.
So in port I go to the gym 3 or 4 times per week to do 3 types of training: Weights, HIIT Cardio, and, Old Mans Exercises.

My diet: Low Carb, no processed food, no or little sugar (except beer sugar ).
Vitamin supplements: D3, K2, (taken at the same time); Zinc and Selenium (taken at the same time); Magnesium, Potassium, CoQ10

Most of my stuff is backed up by research but the Old Man Exercises have been devised by myself and freak out the Gym staff.

As I get older I am concerned with:
Heart: CAC Score - coronary artery calcium - which shows how much actual calcium has built up in my arteries (Very, very little).
Cancer: Cancer cells eat sugar to grow so I keep the sugar down.
Back pain: So I have exercises just for that.
Walking so slowly the Grim Reaper can catch me.
Falls: One bad fall can be catastrophic.

Problems: Back muscles dont actually exist where I need them! Theres no muscle that covers the lower back, the Lumbar Spine area. You don't believe me? Even Arnold Schwarzenegger NEVER had muscles over his lumbar spine!
Google "Bodybuilders Christmas Tree" and look at the images.
You can see their spines...!

All of the muscles are either side, above and below, but not on or around. Weird, huh?
The gap is called the christmas tree because thats what it looks like.

Philosophy: To use science to get the best benefit from the least effort and least time exercising.

Weights: The normal stuff that the gym junkies do but I try to do heavy weights to failure in 4 to 7 repetitions. Then some days light weights to 30 repetitions till failure then drop the weight and keep going till total failure.

HIIT Cardio: We are told to do a few hours of 'brisk walking' every week. But whats Brisk Walking? From the NSW Institute of Sport the idea is we need only have 15 minutes 3 times per week with the heart rate above 150 beats per minute. The difficulty is its desperatly difficult to get it up that high for that long... so they devised a method to trick the heart so it goes up and stays up with the least effort.
On a cardio bike set quite easy (about 5 or 6) I do a 7 second HARD as I can and then 13 seconds very soft, just my legs going around. Watching the cycles clock I do my hard bit at 20; 40 and; 00. Within about 2 minutes the heart rate is up. If it gets too high I cut from 7 seconds to 5 or 4 or even 3 seconds and increase, correspondingly the relax time. 15 minutes is not too difficult.
On the Treadmill walking I set the Incline to the maximum of 15% and the walking speed very low, 4.5kmph. As the heart rate comes up I keep dropping back the speed, not the incline. After 15 minutes Im down to 3.5 kmph - quite easy. 15 minutes no trouble.

Old Mans Exercises: These I have developed myself and get ridiculed by the 20 year old gym instructors.

Picking up dropped keys is done (until were being watched by a fitness guru) by bending down and picking the damn things up. NO! says the guru, I must squat down, back straight to pick up keys, or lift a small weight! But squatting down back straight I cant see the keys, all I can do is feel between my legs for them.
Tying my shoes is done with a bent back. Try tying your shoes with a straight back. impossible.
On a boat twisting whilst pulling is derigour. We all know its "bad" for us but what else can we do?
Instead of saying I can't do this, I have devised Old Mans Exercises so I get muscles to pick up keys, tie my laces and twist while I winch or haul up the halyard or get a bucket full of seawater up the side of the boat and down the companionway.

Bent Back Lifting.
Using the Back Extension equipment at the gym I'm told to keep my back straight... ok I do a few reps like that. But then I drop down chin on chest and back bent and slowly uncurl to horizontal.

Key Drop: I put a light weight on the floor and bend over with bent back and pick it up. Careful to use light weights!

Shoe tying: Situps with bent back.

Barbell behind the back: A light barbell behind my back and lifting it from butt to as high as I can go.

Wrist strengthen: Barbell to do a bicep curl but a bit lighter, after the first curl I open my hands and let the bar roll to my finger-tips then roll them back up into the next curl. Great for forearms and wrists.

Twisting Theres a new machine there i sit in it and twist my upper body. start with a small wieght and note I cant twist far... but now its getting better.

Old Man Jogging: on the street I do about 3kms in 15 minutes. Lil Old Man steps, Ive only just started and its not going too bad at all. Just short and slow.

Walking faster than the Grim Reaper:
We know from Hollywood that the Grim Reaper walks slowly with his scythe mowing down anyone he can catch. But in real life could this be true?
Yes!
And a few scientists tested men to find out that you must walk above 2 miles per hour/ 3kmph or the Grim Reapers gunna get you https://www.bmj.com/content/343/bmj.d7679
So if Im going for a walk of any type I make sure im doing more than 3kmph! simple.

Falls: With gym, walking faster, a few jogs and old mans exercises I am less likely to fall... and if I do my wrists are stronger to allow me to hit the deck without broken bones or ripping tendons.

Conclusion: I see lots of older folks who are unfit... but very very few 75 year olds who look like they work out. Ive started now with the long term view, investing in my health so I can enjoy my other investments.

Mark
Down in the Caribbean we see these local guys who seemingly have perfect bodies, lean and strong, not like body builders they look balanced and tough. I remember seeing one in Grenada walking down a beach early in the AM. At first I put him at 16, but slowly realized he was more like 60.

Their arenít many of them, but more than a few. I assume they are all Rasta but that might be wrong. I find them amazing!
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post #43 of 173 Old 09-16-2019
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Re: Sailing as a senior

I've been avoiding doctors since I got to the age where they feel obligated to find something wrong to fix. Their first question is always "What medications do you take ?" when you answer none they give you the fish eye.

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post #44 of 173 Old 09-16-2019
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Re: Sailing as a senior

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Originally Posted by outbound View Post
Chef have had several versions of lazy jacks. Have caught battens on them. If you donít bring them forward and loop around reefing hooks they can be a PIA. The cover attached to the boom was awkward on some the versions Iíve had. Unlike a Dutchman they donít control the sail. Nor do they cause the sail to fold. The Dutchman prevents the main from flopping around during an evolution which is nice. In fact the main will shimmy down even when not directly into the wind over time. I replaced the 400lb fishing line this year because it was 5 years. Took me ~ an hour. Havenít heard of people breaking that line. You ease off on the topping lift while sailing so thereís no chafe on the sail. You do get dirt lines on the sail if thereís air pollution in your mooring spot. For us it cleared once down in the tropics. I mostly single even with the bride on the boat. Big thing for me was I can release the halyard then go on to other things. The main will come down and be controlled with no further input. Once moored/anchored/ in the slip and can then sort things out if necessary.
If we downsize to below 40í would think about having the shafer system. Like the idea of the track pivoting aft of the mast. A sistership has it but tells me the sail pulls out of the track when in a blow and reefing. He thinks their great up to 40í but forces become to great after that. Another sistership has the leisure furl. He hates it. Works fine but after a few days of hard sailing needs to be retuned. He doesnít understand it as heís marked where everything is and he says nothing moved but the angle becomes incorrect.
I use my vang a lot. So in boom would take getting use to.

I guess the two versions of Lazy Jacks you had were inferior. Our EZJacks ( now jiffy Jacks). Cannot be in the way to hook a batten like the inferior Lazy Jacks) . Why you may ask.....because when you raise the sail they are held along the mast. We have a quantum 4 full batten loose footed sail and have never had an issue hooking. A batten.

The second part about the flaking of the sail . Our EZ Jacks when deployed
Are from the mast back with a narrow chute for the sail to drop in. I have seen the Harken and other Lazy jack systems deployed from the spreaders which donít work as well.

So our jacks have been up for 18 years. Never had to replace or adjust yet. Not every five years....never.

No special slits in the sail cover....no holes in the sail . Itís bad enough we have 8 already for the reefing lines.

So the jacks are against the mast when we raise the sail, so no hooking the battens,.how do they deploy when you want lower, easy peasy ....two lines led back to the cockpit.

When the sail drops....it can sit in itís flaked situation till we dock or anchor.
Great for a single handler. I have friends who have had their monofiliment breaks when the sail was down and the sail flops all over the deck.

Lastly cost . $350 and one time rigger fee of less than $100 as it only takes an hour to rig. What does a Dutchman cost to install....and replace every 5 years. How much extra for the digger every 5 years? How much for the specified sail cover.? How much for the reenforced holes in the sail.

I think the Jiffy/ EZ Jacks are probably cheaper too overall.

The Dutchman is a great system If I had to choose between it and regular Harken Lazy Jacks....it might be a tougher choice for the batten hang up you mentioned . But you can choose a good jack system. BYW the have demos at all the major boat shows like Annapolis and Newport.

I have no affiliations with any of those companies.


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post #45 of 173 Old 09-17-2019
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Re: Sailing as a senior

Quote:
Originally Posted by chef2sail View Post
I guess the two versions of Lazy Jacks you had were inferior. Our EZJacks ( now jiffy Jacks). Cannot be in the way to hook a batten like the inferior Lazy Jacks) . Why you may ask.....because when you raise the sail they are held along the mast. We have a quantum 4 full batten loose footed sail and have never had an issue hooking. A batten.

The second part about the flaking of the sail . Our EZ Jacks when deployed
Are from the mast back with a narrow chute for the sail to drop in. I have seen the Harken and other Lazy jack systems deployed from the spreaders which donít work as well.

So our jacks have been up for 18 years. Never had to replace or adjust yet. Not every five years....never.

No special slits in the sail cover....no holes in the sail . Itís bad enough we have 8 already for the reefing lines.

So the jacks are against the mast when we raise the sail, so no hooking the battens,.how do they deploy when you want lower, easy peasy ....two lines led back to the cockpit.

When the sail drops....it can sit in itís flaked situation till we dock or anchor.
Great for a single handler. I have friends who have had their monofiliment breaks when the sail was down and the sail flops all over the deck.

Lastly cost . $350 and one time rigger fee of less than $100 as it only takes an hour to rig. What does a Dutchman cost to install....and replace every 5 years. How much extra for the digger every 5 years? How much for the specified sail cover.? How much for the reenforced holes in the sail.

I think the Jiffy/ EZ Jacks are probably cheaper too overall.

The Dutchman is a great system If I had to choose between it and regular Harken Lazy Jacks....it might be a tougher choice for the batten hang up you mentioned . But you can choose a good jack system. BYW the have demos at all the major boat shows like Annapolis and Newport.

I have no affiliations with any of those companies.
We have traditional lazy jacks on our 35 footer (244 sq ft main) and they work reasonable well. That is, well enough that I haven't had a strong urge to replace them with another system after 23 years.

While the sail doesn't flake itself like a Dutchman system would, it is adequate under reasonable sailing conditions. What has made life easier is installing single line reefing with halyard and reefing lines led to the cockpit. (We did that 12 years ago after the admiral got uncomfortable handling the boat while I went forward to put in a double reef while beating into a 29 kt breeze. That was our first accommodation to our advancing years as sailors.) If conditions are snotty, you likely would have reefed the sail. In that case, the reefing lines are stretching the sail and helping to semi-flake the sail before it is lowered.

Since there is a lot of drag on the lines with this system, it helps to have blocks for the single line reefing on the sail--ours are the yellow Karver blocks shown in the first thumbnail in which a single reef has been executed. The second thumbnail shows the deck arrangement for the single line reefing (2 reefs) plus the main halyard. With the dodger (not shown) installed, it is necessary to use a short winch handle, which became a pain, so we bought a Winchrite electric "cordless winch handle" to use in our old age.

The other secret weapon in our arsenal is a substantial below deck autopilot that can handle the boat when the wind pipes up and you are single-handed or your crew has limited capability. The first thumbnail was taken while underway to Block Island with my then 8 and 12 yr old grandsons as my only crew, after I had set a single reef as a hedge against the winds picking up.
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post #46 of 173 Old 09-17-2019
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Re: Sailing as a senior

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I've been avoiding doctors since I got to the age where they feel obligated to find something wrong to fix. Their first question is always "What medications do you take ?" when you answer none they give you the fish eye.
There are better docs out there. My doc will not prescribe a med, unless it's really necessary. He especially dislikes antibiotics, unless absolutely necessary. It kills me when I hear someone say they have a sore throat, call their doc and the doc phones in an antibiotic to the pharmacy. WTF!

My doc really is unique. We spend 45 mins together on my annual physical and I'm in very good overall health.

Find a doc like this!
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post #47 of 173 Old 09-17-2019 Thread Starter
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Re: Sailing as a senior

Minni, that sounds great.... but the reality of medicine today is very different. GP Doctors typically are sitting a a computer... looking at varous values from tests.. BP, heart rate, blood panels... They barely every actually touch you... don't ast you do stand or bend or walk.. observe your body's mechanics. If you have a compliant they send you to a specialist who may do some imagining but little more.

This is driven by the "financial model" largely created by insurance providers. Drs want to cover their butts but seem to not actually do much but measure. Some push meds others not so much.
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post #48 of 173 Old 09-17-2019
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Re: Sailing as a senior

My doc is the only person in his office. He has a part time non-medical receptionist, but no nurse, no PA, not other docs. Just him. He doesn't draw blood, you stop by the lab a few days before the exam and my doc has the results when you arrive. Our local hospital has a portal that engages every professional in town. He has access to every report from every other doc I may see, along the way. He has his tablet with him in the exam room to take notes and look up my past records. He prefers non-emergency communication through the messaging system inside this secure portal, rather than leaving phone messages. You can also make your own appointment this way.

He's very engaged in modern medicine and the local physician networks. He's currently the President of some local group of docs, so he is a great resource for competent specialist referrals. In my past, I could tell I was just being sent to a buddy.

It's really a great new model. He may sound like a 20 yr old, but I'd say he's early 40s.
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Re: Sailing as a senior

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My doc is the only person in his office. He has a part time non-medical receptionist, but no nurse, no PA, not other docs. Just him. He doesn't draw blood, you stop by the lab a few days before the exam and my doc has the results when you arrive. Our local hospital has a portal that engages every professional in town. He has access to every report from every other doc I may see, along the way. He has his tablet with him in the exam room to take notes and look up my past records. He prefers non-emergency communication through the messaging system inside this secure portal, rather than leaving phone messages. You can also make your own appointment this way.

He's very engaged in modern medicine and the local physician networks. He's currently the President of some local group of docs, so he is a great resource for competent specialist referrals. In my past, I could tell I was just being sent to a buddy.

It's really a great new model. He may sound like a 20 yr old, but I'd say he's early 40s.
Sounds great but a rarity. We are covered thru wife's union... 1199. So there is a network of providers. It's extensive but it's a corporate model. I suspect most medical care is dispensed via a corporate model. Never any preventative medicine... excels at repairing broken stuff.

pay attention... someone's life depends on it
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post #50 of 173 Old 09-17-2019
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Re: Sailing as a senior

Have single on first two reefs. Double on third. Single is a PIA. Have expensive blocks sewn into sail. Dyneema lines. Fancy dan turning blocks on deck. Everything to reduce friction.friction is very low and you can pull the lines by hand alone. But as line comes down from block on luff of sail it catches on the sail near the boom. Sometimes you need to go forward to clear it. Takes a second but in wind means changing you change your clip to the jack line to do it. Takes longer to do that then the job.
Also if you have crew you need to teach them how to flake lines with no twist. The video with the wacko Brit works best. Always amazed how manyĒexperienced ď sailors donít know how to flake a line. Also find easing a bit of halyard and pulling in a bit of reef line works best. Find it best to NOT use a winch.
The third reef is a joy. Sometimes if Iím alone on deck will skip the second as the third is so easy.
Overall happy with the system. By myself I can safely raise, reef, and strike. If any component fails I can jury rig. I donít need the powered winches but itís nice to push a button to raise the main. Worse case if the winch died or totally failed I can jump it and suspect Iíll be able to into my 80s. Weíre set up so can reef from the cockpit or switch entirely to the mast foot with necessary cleats in place for old time slab.
I thought a lot about setting the boat up to be able to sail her into my twilight years. So far so good.
Some design features are helpful. The narrow cockpit with natural handholds everywhere. The handhold running the whole back edge of the hard dodger and around itís sides. Handholds on the hard Bimini supports. The plethora of handholds below. The absence of hard edges just radius curves. The high degree of natural light in nearly all spaces. Find good light increasingly important as I age.
Think as you go through the boat shows make believe you just strained your back. Put on your readers to obscure your vision. Then move around making believe your doing typical evolutions. You can tell the sailors from the tire kickers. The sailors spend their time on deck first. Checking sight lines. Sitting and standing every where. Examining all the spaghetti and rigging. When they go below they lay down everywhere. Check out the galley and head in detail. If theyíre smart image themselves on that boat in twenty years.
Instead of the production builders going bigger and faster sure would like more new designs aimed at easier, simpler, more durable and safer to live on while traveling around.

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