Sailing failures - Page 5 - SailNet Community
 146Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #41 of 110 Old 10-17-2019
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 1,750
Thanks: 132
Thanked 43 Times in 36 Posts
Rep Power: 10
 
Re: Sailing failures

Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnewaska View Post
This is a problem, as it's different for different manufacturers. Even the time before expiration can differ. Our Kidde are good for 12 years, I believe. and the date of manufacture (not expiration) is embossed on the bottom of the cylinder.

Ironically, I replaced them all a few years back and they almost immediately had a recall, so I got all new for free, about a year later. My boat wasn't 12 years old at the time, but the date on the extinguishers was a couple of years older than than the boat. I bet this is not uncommon, when you buy them off the shelf.

Another best practice is to remove a powder extinguisher from it's mounting bracket, at least annually, and rock it around a bit to insure the powder doesn't settle too much.
Hm, this is a secondary concern, the primary being that the fire extinguisher works when needed. But: if there is no expiration date visible on the unit. how does the CG determine whether to fine you for it being expired?
MastUndSchotbruch is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #42 of 110 Old 10-17-2019
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 1,750
Thanks: 132
Thanked 43 Times in 36 Posts
Rep Power: 10
 
Re: Sailing failures

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilCarlson View Post
Lesson passed along from a friend who discovered the 'settled powder effect' while fighting a fire. His habit had been to check the gauge only. The extinguisher discharged, but not nearly as much powder as it should have. (happy ending regarding the fire)

Since then he has taken to periodically tapping on the cylinders with a rubber mallet. I immediately applied that technique to my extinguishers and could absolutely hear and feel the difference as the powder loosened up. It's now a regular practice.
I have done this occasionally but never noticed anything moving inside. Does that mean everything is just beautiful, or the powder is so much settled that nothing will budge it?
MastUndSchotbruch is online now  
post #43 of 110 Old 10-17-2019
Senior Member
 
Minnesail's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 2,907
Thanks: 165
Thanked 118 Times in 114 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
Re: Sailing failures

Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnesail View Post
I was on a Delphia 37 that had the propane shutoff UNDERNEATH the oven. Like, not on a panel below; you actually had to reach in a ways underneath the oven. Itís a Polish design. Insert ethnic joke here. Otherwise it was a lovely sailboat.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnewaska View Post
Bet you wouldn't insert that joke if there were a half dozen 6ft Poles sitting at your table. That's likely the case on an international sailing forum. No?
It was a cheap shot to be sure, my apologies to the Polish readers of this forum. Perhaps being of Norwegian descent Iím a little too comfortable with deprecating national jokes. (Ole, Lena, et al.)

And more directly, I doubt the position of the shutoff was the choice of the good designers at Delphia. The rest of the boat, both sailing and accommodations, was well thought out.

Catalina 22
on a starboard tack
Minnesail is offline  
 
post #44 of 110 Old 10-17-2019
bell ringer
 
Don L's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Marathon Fl
Posts: 4,256
Thanks: 10
Thanked 120 Times in 107 Posts
Rep Power: 12
 
Re: Sailing failures

I've never read a single great adventure salty story scare the crap out you super brave facing the elements because everything went wrong and I almost died so I wrote a book to make money off it by making it a great sea story account BOOK!

Reading sailing forums the past 12 years or so I learned all I needed to know about those stories - don't be an idiot and if you aren't don't have a schedule that turns you into one
Whalerus likes this.

Don't blow air up my rear, be useful and blow it at the sails!
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Don L is online now  
post #45 of 110 Old 10-17-2019
Senior Member
 
davidpm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Madison
Posts: 5,090
Thanks: 530
Thanked 91 Times in 81 Posts
Rep Power: 13
 
Re: Sailing failures

This is an epic story that will keep you entertained for a few hours.

https://www.sailnet.com/forums/gener...-atlantic.html

I met Doug, Interesting guy. He bought another boat even bigger after losing Triumph.

The lesson from the Icarus story is not about human failing.
It is a lesson about the limitations of wax as an adhesive.
If you have an engineering problem solve it.
davidpm is offline  
post #46 of 110 Old 10-17-2019
Old soul
 
MikeOReilly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Wherever I am
Posts: 4,079
Thanks: 253
Thanked 197 Times in 184 Posts
Rep Power: 10
 
Re: Sailing failures

Quote:
Originally Posted by Don0190 View Post
I've never read a single great adventure salty story scare the crap out you super brave facing the elements because everything went wrong and I almost died so I wrote a book to make money off it by making it a great sea story account BOOK!

Reading sailing forums the past 12 years or so I learned all I needed to know about those stories - don't be an idiot and if you aren't don't have a schedule that turns you into one
Great book idea!

Title: My Big Scary Sailing Story
Subtitle: My great adventure salty story scare the crap out me super brave facing the elements because everything went wrong and I almost died

bshock, Minnesail and Whalerus like this.

Why go fast, when you can go slow.
BLOG:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
MikeOReilly is online now  
post #47 of 110 Old 10-17-2019
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Jackson WY
Posts: 2,195
Thanks: 45
Thanked 85 Times in 84 Posts
Rep Power: 18
 
Re: Sailing failures

Why would someone write a book about a failed attempt at something, unless you failed spectacularly it would not be a very interesting story I think one would lick their wounds move back to shore and try to get on with their life.

I do remember someone who wrote about his adventures and I think shared it here a few years ago. He was self-deprecating saying how he was short and overweight and not mechanically inclined. Still, he took sailing lessons, bought a boat, fixed it up and took off cruising. He made it to The Sea of Cortez from San Francisco sailed for a couple of months and considered it enough of a success to write a book about it.

I think the stories of successes are often ones of multiple failures and perseverance leading to success.

Jordan
West Wight Potter 14 "Lemon Drop"
Oceanside CA
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.
jephotog is offline  
post #48 of 110 Old 10-17-2019
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 2,843
Thanks: 1
Thanked 41 Times in 40 Posts
Rep Power: 13
 
Re: Sailing failures

Bill Bryson wrote a book called a " Walk in the Woods" which was later made into a movie Starring Robert Redford, Nolte and Emma Thompson.

I think Bryson, only got 200 miles along the trail before calling it quits. Failure turned into Success?
wsmurdoch and Minnesail like this.
tempest is online now  
post #49 of 110 Old 10-17-2019
Senior Member
 
Minnesail's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 2,907
Thanks: 165
Thanked 118 Times in 114 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
Re: Sailing failures

Quote:
Originally Posted by tempest View Post
Bill Bryson wrote a book called a " Walk in the Woods" which was later made into a movie Starring Robert Redford, Nolte and Emma Thompson.

I think Bryson, only got 200 miles along the trail before calling it quits. Failure turned into Success?
Good example! I never saw the movie, but the book was hilarious. We need a similar sailing book.

Catalina 22
on a starboard tack
Minnesail is offline  
post #50 of 110 Old 10-17-2019
Member
 
Aquarian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 64
Thanks: 7
Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
Rep Power: 10
 
On the topic of dry chem fire extinguishers. They should be turned upside down and shaken or spanked a couple times a year. The chemicals settle in the bottom and pack down over time preventing them from being expelled properly. Sounds goofy, but tis true - I worked for a fire safety service co once upon a time.
SanderO likes this.
Aquarian is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome