How to heave to in IOR boat (small main, large headsail, fin keel) - SailNet Community
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post #1 of 11 Old 11-03-2019 Thread Starter
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How to heave to in IOR boat (small main, large headsail, fin keel)

I can heave to in my boat with my usual sail configuration (huge headsail and small main) by tacking from a close haul, leaving the headsail sheet cleated thus backwinding it, trimming the main sheet, and lashing the filler to leeward. My concern is that the boat ends up with its beam facing the wind/waves). Any tips for pointing higher whilst heaving to?

One thing I tried today was easing the back winded headsail such that the clew starts to sneak around the shrouds toward the leeward side and the headsail spills some wind. It did cause the bow to point significantly higher but I notice from my GPS track that instead of not moving or gradually going directly down wind the boat was slowly making way 90 degrees to the wind (like a really slow beam reach)... is the what fore-reaching is? I guess it’s not necessarily a problem...

Thoughts?
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Re: How to heave to in IOR boat (small main, large headsail, fin keel)

Tiller might be too far to lee. Try lashing it 2/3rds or so.
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Re: How to heave to in IOR boat (small main, large headsail, fin keel)

Do you have roller furling on the jib? If so, it may work better rolled up a bit (it does on mine). In either case, as Arcb points out, trying subtle adjustments to tiller, main and jib should influence how the boat sits.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scotty C-M View Post
Do you have roller furling on the jib? If so, it may work better rolled up a bit (it does on mine). In either case, as Arcb points out, trying subtle adjustments to tiller, main and jib should influence how the boat sits.
No roller furling... just hanks for me.
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Re: How to heave to in IOR boat (small main, large headsail, fin keel)

I had the same issue you describe with the bow being blown down and needing to spill some wind. Having the wheel hard over wouldn’t help even if the wind was strong enough so like you describe I would have to ease the jib sheet...

Installing roller furling made a huge difference with that.

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Re: How to heave to in IOR boat (small main, large headsail, fin keel)

First of all, ideally when a boat is hove to it is perpendicular to the wind and that puts the perpendicular to the waves. Having the bow slightly upwind puts more strain on the rudder since most boats but especially fin keel boats tend to 'cradle' (move forward a little then aft a little in a series of arcs) a little when hove to. Putting the bow slightly upwind means that the boat will move aft slight faster than forward risking damage to the rudder. So, with that in mind, it sounds like your boat is heaving to perfectly.

Many IOR boats will heave to, but they do risk damaging the rig and sails if the headsail is left lapping the shrouds in a strong breeze.

Jeff


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Re: How to heave to in IOR boat (small main, large headsail, fin keel)

Do you have a smaller working jib? It sounds like you need to decrease the jib's area relative to that of the main. If you ever really need to heave-to, you probably will already be flying a smaller headsail due to the wind conditions.

Heaving-to is definitely easier to accomplish on a heavy, full-keeled boat but it is possible to do it on a boat with fin keel and spade rudder. Just takes a lot of experimenting with sail trim and rudder angle. And remember when you really need to heave-to, the wind will probably be stronger than what you normally sail in. In those conditions, you may find that you can only get the boat to stall out when the sails are reefed heavily. A smaller headsail would probably be subject to less chafing on the shrouds and would put a lot less strain on the rig than would a genoa. If you are going to heave-to for an extended period of time and your sheet is rubbing on the outside of your windward shrouds, consider using a barber hauler or rigging a temporary sheet that leads inside the shrouds to prevent chafing.
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Thanks Jeff. I guess there is some disagreement between various experts regarding whether the beam ought to be directly facing wind and waves. My boat can heave to, stop on a dime and slowly drift downwind. It’s great actually but I’ve never been out in terrible conditions. My concern is that since my beam faces weather, large waves will swamp the cockpit or even knock the boat down since my sails in this configuration cause the boat to heel quite a bit to begin with.

Many references and books I’ve come across suggest that the bow ought to be more like 45 degrees off the wind.

Do most folks feel safe heaved to 90 degrees off the wind? Maybe creating the slick mitigates the effects of the waves?
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Re: How to heave to in IOR boat (small main, large headsail, fin keel)

Quote:
Originally Posted by matthewwhill View Post
.....Do most folks feel safe heaved to 90 degrees off the wind? Maybe creating the slick mitigates the effects of the waves?
That's generally the idea. More to the point, it's intended to keep them from breaking.

Some seem to be disputing this lately and consider other methods, such as dragging a drogue to be a better practice. Particularly, when heaving to for very heavy weather.

If you're just heaving to in order to take a break, none of this really matters (not even forereaching), only that the boat is stable.


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Re: How to heave to in IOR boat (small main, large headsail, fin keel)

I have an IOR boat (1980 San Juan 28) and it is fairly simple to backwind the sails. We are perpendicular to the wind as well but that is how I thought it was supposed to be.
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