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post #11 of 36 Old 11-06-2019
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Re: Anchoring single handed whilst hove to?

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Originally Posted by Arcb View Post
Small boats Capta, so they have tiny foredecks. Pretty tricky to sail these little boats from out on the bow. Heaving to gives you a more stable platform to work from.

Like the OP, I heave to even just to start my outboard.

I agree, it might not make sense on a bigger boat.

Heres a look at my foredeck. About 18 inches across with no life lines. No anchor locker either. My anchor is stored in a cockpit locker.
I can only speak from my own experience, so those reading my posts can take what they think would be of use or nothing, as the case may be.
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post #12 of 36 Old 11-06-2019 Thread Starter
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Re: Anchoring single handed whilst hove to?

Jeff H and Capta - you're suggestions are very helpful. I don't know if I am fast enough to do all these tasks, go back and forth etc... My boat is a bit bigger than Arcb's but not so big that it could ever have enough momentum to travel 30-50 feet up wind once I've dropped the sails. I like doing things slowly and deliberately. The idea of heaving to in order to stop everything, then carefully going to the bow and gradually letting out the anchor and rode while the boat goes to leeward at one knot appeals to me. You guys may have better methods, I'm not arguing that.

Last edited by matthewwhill; 11-06-2019 at 08:34 PM.
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post #13 of 36 Old 11-06-2019
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Re: Anchoring single handed whilst hove to?

This is the method I use:

1. Heave to.
2. Drop the anchor off the windward side of the stern beside the cockpit. I store my 250 feet of anchor rode in a random heap in my stern locker in a laundry basket, along with the anchor and chain.
3. As soon as the 25 feet of anchor chain passes over the side, I pass the (fiber) rode through a snatch block.
4. I haul the anchor rode to the bow. A hauling line attaches to the snatch block that runs up to a bow skein chock (inboard of the shrouds), through the chock and back to the the snatch block (outboard of the shrouds) at the stern, in a loop.
5. I let out the appropriate length of rode, and then snub it off on the jibsheet horn cleat (at the stern).
6. The forward/downwind motion of the hove to boat (the motion is about 1 unit downwind for every 2 units forward) sets the anchor.

I’ve anchored without need of an engine and without ever leaving my seat in the cockpit.

Weighing anchor:

1. Raise the jib. Haul it to windward so it’s taken aback. (If the wind has picked up since anchoring, I left out more rode first to create a better catenary angle.)
2. Raise the main with the mainsheet let all the way out till the main begins to luff. Set the tiller to steer fully upwind. Tie it off.
3. Wrap the anchor rode around the jibsheet winch and haul the boat toward the anchor.
4. When the anchor unsets, I quickly haul some more line up by hand. (The boat is now underway, hove to.) Once unset, the only tension on the rode is from the weight of the anchor and rode/chain.
5. With the snatch block loop, I haul the rode back to the stern beside the cockpit.
6. Snub off the rode when the anchor is safely off the bottom.
7. Release the windward jibsheet and take in the lee jib sheet. Set the rudder. Set the mainsheet. (If I intend to get underway from being hove to.)
8. Haul in the anchor rode till the fiber rode-to-chain attachment is above the water line. (Dragging the anchor and chain through the water while underway usually removes most of the bottom mud.)
9. Take the rode out of the snatch block.
10. Haul the chain and anchor aboard by hand. Store the anchor and chain in the stern locker (where the sinky bottom mud never gets inside my cabin's air space).

I have now taken in the anchor and gotten underway without leaving the cockpit and without need of an engine.

Side remark:

If you can't perform all important operations without an engine, you don't have a sailboat. Instead, it's a wind-assisted power boat. I learned to sail in Sweden, where only lubberly wimps were dependent on an engine. I'm amazed at how few skippers here in the US don't even know how to take in their main without powering into the wind. Good luck if your engine doesn't start! Heave to instead. Here's how I do that (single handed):
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Last edited by patrickbryant; 11-06-2019 at 10:19 PM.
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post #14 of 36 Old 11-06-2019 Thread Starter
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Patrickbryant- this is fantastic! My questions:

Is the anchoring load on the chock, the line looped to the snatch block, the snatch block itself, or the anchor rode and the cleat at the stern? Or a combination of those?

If a part of the load is born by the snatch block is it strong enough?

If a part of the load is on the stern cleat will this pull that part of the stern forward toward the anchor?
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post #15 of 36 Old 11-07-2019
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Re: Anchoring single handed whilst hove to?

I am not sure I understand this thread... but here goes:

I always anchor up and down under power. I have on occassion when conditions are favorable and I plenty of room sail off the anchor with main alone... then unfurl the genny.

I use an electric windlass with up down switches so I prefer to run the engine and not strain the electrical system.

I have remote switches in the cockpit which I can use as well. If it's windy and the bow is blown off the wind the chain sometimes is pulled out of the groove in the bow roller. So for retrieval I run the windlass with only a fair angle.

Hoisting and dropping the mainsail is greatly helped with the boat directly bow to wind. I do this by turning AP to a 0 wind angle and motor very very slowly on that course. I have to help the drop by pulling down on the leech of the sail a bit. If I had less friction in the mast track this wouldn't be required.

I motor on and off the mooring. To pick up I reverse throttle to stop the boat when the mooring is just to one side of the bow for an easy pick up. To leave I drop the mooring lines and let the wind blow the bow off and then motor out of the mooring field to an empty spot to raise the main. AP is engaged when clear of moored or anchored boats.

Usually sail with main alone or motor sail to follow channels as there is often traffic ahead, behind coming and going and some sailing (tacking) in or out of the harbor. I maintain better control with motor on. I unfurl the genny when I have a good point of sail and good visibility.

I have never hove to. In the ocean I sail a comfortable point of sail... even slowly of my desired heading. Nasty seas require that I helm the boat and let the AP have a break.

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Re: Anchoring single handed whilst hove to?

Have a history of two footitis so had a secession of small boats. Go to technique with them.
Sort out anchor and chain/rode before entering harbor. Bop around and decide where to drop.
Approach that spot some yards to windward on a reach.
Once to windward of desired spot head directly into the wind. Leave sheets alone and sails flopping.
Run up to foredeck and drop.
Go to mast and drop jib or to cockpit and roll it up.
Drop main.
Would leave sheets slack throughout.
This worked on everything from 19’ to 36’. Worked with a reliable engine or no engine. If I had a reliable engine would do about the same but drop/roll jib before entering harbor.
With small engineless (or unreliable) boats having sails up let me get out of Dodge if I had to not drop for one reason or another and not hit another boat. Usually did this by myself.
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post #17 of 36 Old 11-07-2019
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Re: Anchoring single handed whilst hove to?

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickbryant View Post
This is the method I use:

1. Heave to.
2. Drop the anchor off the windward side of the stern beside the cockpit. I store my 250 feet of anchor rode in a random heap in my stern locker in a laundry basket, along with the anchor and chain.
3. As soon as the 25 feet of anchor chain passes over the side, I pass the (fiber) rode through a snatch block.
4. I haul the anchor rode to the bow. A hauling line attaches to the snatch block that runs up to a bow skein chock (inboard of the shrouds), through the chock and back to the the snatch block (outboard of the shrouds) at the stern, in a loop.
5. I let out the appropriate length of rode, and then snub it off on the jibsheet horn cleat (at the stern).
6. The forward/downwind motion of the hove to boat (the motion is about 1 unit downwind for every 2 units forward) sets the anchor.
I’ve anchored without need of an engine and without ever leaving my seat in the cockpit.
I don't get how the above actually works. The above explains how to get the anchor and line down to the bottom, but it does not explain how you set the anchor once it is down. To me there are two serious flaws in this approach.

The first I have mentioned which is that hove-to the boat is moving sidewards too slowly to be able to properly set an anchor.

But probably the more critical is what happens once the anchor is down. In other words, when the anchor and chain is on the bottom, at least on my boat, the friction and weight are enough to pull the bow head to wind and onto the next tack even if the anchor is not set. Now you are on the next tack with the jib and main full and a bunch of anchor line out. If you drop or furl the jib, before the boats comes up into the wind and onto the next tack, you are caught beam to the wind without the jib to stop the boat, so you will be sailing with a full mainsail perpendicular to the anchor rode. If you ease the jib sheet, you are in exactly the same position. Dropping the mainsail with the wind perpendicular to it would be very difficult and would result in the bow trying to turn down wind and risk fouling the anchor rode on the keel.

As I noted above, it would seem to make absolutely no sense to try to anchor when hove to. It just makes things much harder to do.
I will also note, that despite the title of the YouTube video, that boat is not hove to since it never loses its bow wave and forward motion. More accurately it is forereaching and again. I am not clear how you anchor when you are forereaching.

Jeff
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Last edited by Jeff_H; 11-07-2019 at 12:57 PM.
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Re: Anchoring single handed whilst hove to?

So the OP with a 26 ft sailboat asks about anchoring technique on a heave to situation. He carries his anchor in the stern.

As typical some of the responses have nothing to do with his situation, but describe your own personal anchoring techniques. I do t think that’s really relevant and contributes to thread drift.

Try and consider what he is dealing with. He has no electric windlass So using that in your response isn’t relevant. He has a small foredeck and narrow gunnels so running to the bow isn’t relevant. He isn’t picking up a mooring, he is anchoring.

JeffH has described perfectly a technique which the OP could use.


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post #19 of 36 Old 11-07-2019
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Re: Anchoring single handed whilst hove to?

Quote:
Originally Posted by matthewwhill View Post
Patrickbryant- this is fantastic! My questions:

Is the anchoring load on the chock, the line looped to the snatch block, the snatch block itself, or the anchor rode and the cleat at the stern? Or a combination of those?

If a part of the load is born by the snatch block is it strong enough?

If a part of the load is on the stern cleat will this pull that part of the stern forward toward the anchor?
The entire load is on the anchor rode and jibsheet cleat. The only load on the snatch block and loop is the load needed to haul the rode to the bow from the cockpit (the stern quarter) while initially anchoring when the anchor has not yet been set, and to haul the rode back to the cockpit after the anchor has been unset. While anchored, all of the load passes through the anchor rode that runs parallel to the loop and snatch block. Of course, the jibsheet cleat has to be sufficiently robust to carry the anchor loads, and I've chosen a robust snatch block rated at 5,000 pounds- just in case. (https://www.garhauermarine.com/snatch-block-70sn.html)

One other advantage of this method is the ability to use a jibsheet winch to take in the anchor rode. Naturally, all of the components involved: bow skein chock, snatch block, winch and cleat must be robust enough to do the job.

Since there is no angular difference between the anchor rode passing through the bow skein chock and the loop (the lines are parallel) while the anchor is set, there is no yawing tendency caused by the loop. I'll take some photos of the setup this weekend and post them here.

Last edited by patrickbryant; 11-07-2019 at 01:46 PM.
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Re: Anchoring single handed whilst hove to?

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Originally Posted by Jeff_H View Post

As I noted above, it would seem to make absolutely no sense to try to anchor when hove to. It just makes things much harder to do.
I will also note, that despite the title of the YouTube video, that boat is not hove to since it never loses its bow wave and forward motion. More accurately it is forereaching and again. I am not clear how you anchor when you are forereaching.

Jeff
So if I may, I will summarize your response to the original question: "Anchoring single handed whilst hove to?" I interpret your response above to say: "It makes no sense to do that."

OK, you are entitled to your opinion.

There are times when the wind is so light that I have no choice but to anchor on a downwind run. I infer that the OP means there is enough wind to heave to in the first place.

Your definition of "hove to" seems to differ from mine. It wasn't practical to include an instrument reading in the video, but I assure you, the wind was directly abeam (90 degrees offset from the boat's heading). You may have studied sailing somewhere different than I, or you may not be accustomed to the appearance of a boat with a full keel when hove to.

"... that boat is not hove to since it never loses its bow wave and forward motion."

Or you may not know that boats don't come to a dead stop in the water when they are hove to (why set the rudder if that were the case?). The boat will move slowly forward and down wind. Depending on the boat and keel design, the motion through the water will be offset about 45 degrees athwart toward down wind from its heading. Some fin-keeled boats with very effective rudders can go a little slower - but they never stop entirely when hove to. My boat has a speed over ground of about 1.5 knots when hove to. Any slower, and it loses streerage -- and you are no longer hove to. Instead, you are wallowing around in an unsteerable boat that's "caught in irons". Not a safe or pleasant condition to be in if you don't have a engine to effect an escape.

The whole point of heaving to is to place your boat in a condition where she will tend to herself (I once spent 24 hours in big ocean swell hove to without touching the tiller), where there is minimal forward movement (not zero), and minimal impact from swells and windwaves approaching from windward because they tend to collapse in the boat's turbulence. Stopping all forward motion (if you even can), negates the advantage of the boat's turbulence, making it an unpleasant, unstable, and unstreeable ride.

Once the main starts to be taken in, the boat naturally falls off into a slight downwind run when only the jib is effective. You can see that change by the movement on the sun in the video. I don't define that condition as "hove to." But it is the opposite of "forereaching." After the entire operation is completed, the boat has performed a complete 360 degree turn in a circle, using very little seaway.

We can argue terms forever. I didn't post to engage in a socratic argument. I'm only offering what works for me. Take it or leave it.

Last edited by patrickbryant; 11-07-2019 at 02:52 PM.
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