Sailing La Vegabond - Page 38 - SailNet Community
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post #371 of 597 Old 12-03-2019
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Re: Sailing La Vegabond

Well, my congratulations to S/V Vagabonde and her captain & crew for a successful voyage and safe landfall. Hopefully they all get some rest before their next adventures begin.

This was an entertaining and educational event to follow, from many different aspects, to say the least!
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post #372 of 597 Old 12-03-2019
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Re: Sailing La Vegabond

Just a thought. Could one of the mods change the subject to the correct spelling?

I was just thinking that it would make this thread easier to find if someone is doing a search on:
La Vagabonde

Catalina 22
on a starboard tack
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Re: Sailing La Vegabond

Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBlaze View Post
This stream is the Spanish version I think. Riley and Nikki talk at around 4:07:00

Seems that they lost one of their cool helm chairs to a wave

https://youtu.be/XWkf33S92t0?t=13003
Lucky it was only the helm chair and not one of the crew.

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Re: Sailing La Vegabond

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Originally Posted by mbianka View Post
This morning finds them in the straits leading to Lisbon. A check of the boat shows a speed of 2.2 knots. Apparently they are sailing and not using the engines. At the request of Greta and frustration of Riley? I wonder. When you've been speeding along at 9 knots or more for weeks must seem a bit slow.
No, I don't think that is a reasonable assumption. In their past videos Riley has talked about how he likes the times when they don't have to be in a hurry and they can sail along, even if the winds are light. I think he is proud of the fact that he taught himself to sail, and how much he has advanced his sailing skills in the past few years. In watching their videos, I have come to believe that he is a consummate yachtsman. He likes the challenge of sailing, and advancing his skills.

When I go sailing, I often challenge myself, by trying to see how long I can go without firing up the iron Jenny. I'm not anti engine, and it's not a religious thing. I like to challenge my light air sailing skills and I like to challenge my skills sailing into the wind.

I'd be pleased to sail Greta and her dad somewhere, and play games of Yahtzee with them. I'd say, "Hey kid, I understand that you like to reduce the burning of fossil fuels, and find alternative ways to travel. That's cool. As a sailor, I accept the challenge. I'd like to see if we can make it all the way with wind power alone. I can't promise that we won't have to fire up the engine, but we'll see how far we can go without".

In fact, I imagine that Riley and Greta may have had a conversation very much like that.
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Re: Sailing La Vegabond

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No, I don't think that is a reasonable assumption. In their past videos Riley has talked about how he likes the times when they don't have to be in a hurry and they can sail along, even if the winds are light. I think he is proud of the fact that he taught himself to sail, and how much he has advanced his sailing skills in the past few years. In watching their videos, I have come to believe that he is a consummate yachtsman. He likes the challenge of sailing, and advancing his skills.

When I go sailing, I often challenge myself, by trying to see how long I can go without firing up the iron Jenny. I'm not anti engine, and it's not a religious thing. I like to challenge my light air sailing skills and I like to challenge my skills sailing into the wind.

I'd be pleased to sail Greta and her dad somewhere, and play games of Yahtzee with them. I'd say, "Hey kid, I understand that you like to reduce the burning of fossil fuels, and find alternative ways to travel. That's cool. As a sailor, I accept the challenge. I'd like to see if we can make it all the way with wind power alone. I can't promise that we won't have to fire up the engine, but we'll see how far we can go without".

In fact, I imagine that Riley and Greta may have had a conversation very much like that.
Interesting about Riley's use of fuel. Since the latest La Vagabonde video has Riley having a boat come out of Montauk to deliver some diesel because they were worried about having enough fuel on La Vagabonde to make it into Montauk. Either he did not fuel up before starting the 1,000 mile passage or they burned a lot of fuel getting to Montauk. Their videos don't say how that situation happened.

Wonder if we will see some of those on board discussions in videos? Yes the discussions on board would indeed have been interesting. Especially since Riley made his initial money to buy a boat by working on Oil Rigs. Nikki makes mention of some the conversations they had on board which seems to indicate there was some disagreements "We have had many conversations on-board about the climate emergency - about how bleak the situation is. There have been some heated discussions too - is it too late? Should we still hope? Can we feel positive? Is it constructive to be afraid? To name a few."


Since Riley as you say like many sailors hates to put on the engine and would rather sail in light winds. I would expect he might look into Electric Propulsion on their next Cat or maybe a retrofit. It would fit in well with his sailing modes. I expect him to pay a visit to Outremer since they are in Europe with some of the Catamaran designs he has been working on driving Elyna crazy talking about them. Or at the very least get a new helm seat to replace the one that got washed over board on this trip

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Re: Sailing La Vegabond

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Nikki makes mention of some the conversations they had on board which seems to indicate there was some disagreements "We have had many conversations on-board about the climate emergency - about how bleak the situation is. There have been some heated discussions too - is it too late? Should we still hope? Can we feel positive? Is it constructive to be afraid? To name a few."
We're only speculating, of course, but I'd wonder if the disagreements might have been across generations. I remember being Greta's age and worrying about the Viet Nam War, the deaths of people of my generation, the environmental impact of Napalm and Agent Orange, the smog that regularly blanketed L.A., the fish kills that were washing up on the shores of the Great Lakes, and the fire that burned on the Cuyahoga River. I was convinced that the older generation had mismanaged things and the world looked doomed. I joined environmental groups and campaigns. I sometimes thought that God would be justified in wiping the human race off the face of the planet, leaving it to wildlife.

Fifty years later, I have the benefit of age and experience, to know that we survived, and that the human race continues to muddle along. I'm still concerned about the environment, and pollution, and I try to lead a life that, as much as possible, doesn't add horribly to the problem, and maybe adds to the solution a little. I'm glad for kids like Greta, and I applaud her effort. I don't see that her passion and concern does anything but good. She has found a platform that has other's of her generation thinking, and considering options. I'm more concerned about Kardashians, and kids of Jersey Shore, who seem more focused on fame and fortune, and promoting wasteful and selfish mass consumerism.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mbianka View Post
Since Riley as you say like many sailors hates to put on the engine and would rather sail in light winds. I would expect he might look into Electric Propulsion on their next Cat or maybe a retrofit. It would fit in well with his sailing modes. I expect him to pay a visit to Outremer since they are in Europe with some of the Catamaran designs he has been working on driving Elyna crazy talking about them. Or at the very least get a new helm seat to replace the one that got washed over board on this trip
I imagine that Riley understands enough about engineering, to know that electric propulsion is not realistic for the worldwide cruising that he does. Plus, now that he is a dad, I imagine that he doesn't want to risk times when they might find themselves stuck out at sea, waiting for either the wind to blow, or the sun to recharge his batteries.
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Last edited by midwesterner; 12-03-2019 at 05:13 PM.
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Re: Sailing La Vegabond

Quote:
Originally Posted by midwesterner View Post

I imagine that Riley understands enough about engineering, to know that electric propulsion is not realistic for the worldwide cruising that he does. Plus, now that he is a dad, I imagine that he doesn't want to risk times when they might find themselves stuck out at sea, waiting for either the wind to blow, or the sun to recharge his batteries.
Seems like a cat offers a large footprint to collect solar power. If they are not motoring a lot and have a genset to charge when absolutely needed... why not engineer an electric propulsion catamaran?

Stuck out where? How much fuel should he carry? Does he carry?

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Re: Sailing La Vegabond

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Originally Posted by midwesterner View Post
We're only speculating, of course, but I'd wonder if the disagreements might have been across generations. I remember being Greta's age and worrying about the Viet Nam War, the deaths of people of my generation, the environmental impact of Napalm and Agent Orange, the smog that regularly blanketed L.A., the fish kills that were washing up on the shores of the Great Lakes, and the fire that burned on the Cuyahoga River. I was convinced that the older generation had mismanaged things and the world looked doomed. I joined environmental groups and campaigns. I sometimes thought that God would be justified in wiping the human race off the face of the planet, leaving it to wildlife.

Fifty years later, I have the benefit of age and experience, to know that we survived, and that the human race continues to muddle along. I'm still concerned about the environment, and pollution, and I try to lead a life that, as much as possible, doesn't add horribly to the problem, and maybe adds to the solution a little. I'm glad for kids like Greta, and I applaud her effort. I don't see that her passion and concern does anything but good. She has found a platform that has other's of her generation thinking, and considering options. I'm more concerned about Kardashians, and kids of Jersey Shore, who seem more focused on fame and fortune, and promoting wasteful and selfish mass consumerism.
Yes funny how the Earth seems to survive and actually seems to get better. Despite all the Cassandra like warnings of the earths demise over the years. BTW I certainly had my activist days in my youth (20's into 30's) fighting the Shoreham Nuclear plant on Long island. I did not tend to join groups having seen that things done by committees tended to be a waste of my time. I instead did my own research wrote letters to the editor, government agencies and politicians at all levels. I clipped many stories about the industry. Putting my money where my mouth was. I also bought several hundred shares of the Power Company building the plant so I could address their annual meetings. Actually turned out to be a great investment in the end too. I even made an editorial reply on my of the local New York TV stations against the plant. I spoke at Legislative hearings. I made my arguments with facts from my research. At one hearing a pro nuclear scientist came up to me and begrudgingly mentioned I had a "killer argument". I had over two file cabinet draws of articles and other clippings. I finally burned all those papers in the fireplace two years ago. Despite all the Cassandra like warnings that the lights would go out without the nuclear plant they have remained on. Many houses now sport solar panels and the system has become more reliable.


Quote:
I imagine that Riley understands enough about engineering, to know that electric propulsion is not realistic for the worldwide cruising that he does. Plus, now that he is a dad, I imagine that he doesn't want to risk times when they might find themselves stuck out at sea, waiting for either the wind to blow, or the sun to recharge his batteries.
I disagree. Just this past summer two boats with electric propulsion auxiliary systems have crossed the Atlantic. I know of at least one EP powered Cat that has done it too. Having had an EP system on my boat since 2008 I would never go back to having a diesel engine connected to the prop. My solar panels keep the batteries topped up most of the time but, I also have a small generator for charging at anchor and extended electro sailing. But, I use it much less than I originally thought I would. It sounds as though Riley did not use the engine on the recent passage except at the beginning and end for docking. Which an EP system could easily have done too. La Vagabonde or anyboat would have done nicely on this passage with EP. Not only making fuel (energy) using wind and solar. But, could also use EP's regeneration properties using the props for charging too. Greta might even have a little smile on her face for a change.
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Last edited by mbianka; 12-04-2019 at 01:02 AM.
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Re: Sailing La Vegabond

Nikki Henderson's Land Ho post:

Day 21

Land ahoy! And just like that - a new continent appears. Yellow and orange and white twinkling lights across half our horizon. More than 10 targets showing on our chart plotter. The solitude of life at sea is now over. The shift can be overwhelming. All of a sudden - there are so many stimulants - people, smells (there is really a lack of scents at sea!), sounds, noise. Itís incredible how fast it changes and how quickly we adapt again to land life - in the same way as when you head out to sea, and once the land disappears the mood changes; things slow down, get quieter and your boat universe begins.

We had quite a day yesterday. As dawn broke Elayna and I were enjoying a morning mocha when we got thrown off our feet. The waves were building. By 0800am it was blowing 40 knots and 5+ metre breaking swells were soaring into our beam - building in slow motion up up up and then lifting us high to the sky as they flowed beneath us - and then if you watched to starboard you could see them crashing down into an abyss of turquoise and white and blue water. The colours in a storm are the most impressive thing of all. Shades of blue appear that you have never seen before - bright bright blue and the darkest deepest navy in the heavy swells - and they change so quickly all the time. Itís just so hypnotic. Yesterday reminded me of a time a few years ago in the North Pacific - not as treacherous now, and nearly as beautiful.

Thankfully the conditions only peaked for a few hours. By 1000am things began to subside as they have done gradually up to now. This was a welcome relief as we had things to do. Our last lunch and last supper were served - leftovers - trying to eat all the remaining fresh food so it doesnít go to waste. So we have all overdosed on pumpkin. We spoke about what we have missed and what we are looking forward to - I said my family and friends. Itís been particularly hard to be away this time, as everyone else onboard had someone close to them. The other things in discussion - walking, exercise, land routine, choice, a full nightís sleep, home, dogs (Greta and Svanteís).

We took some last photos of us all at sea. Our temporary family - now friends. The sea has a magical way of forming bonds between people that go so very deep. You see the best and the worst of each other. Itís unavoidable out here. The result is a deep understanding of one another - an empathetic love - respect - the faith that you have each otherís backs, and will do again if needed. The process of achieving something so great and so challenging creates a shared common ground - an experience that ties you to each other, in a way, forever.

Mike
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Re: Sailing La Vegabond

This last post reminds me of the issues about who you go to sea with for long passages. You're out there with no way of getting off and have to work together for the most part. Yet we may find ourselves with crew who turn out to be very different from what we expected. I was crew on a delivery from Caribe to LIS years ago. Skipper and one crew were fabulous. Not so for the other two. One was a skipper on another boat and the other was his female companion. Who wants to spend weeks with people who you don't care for?

I've had crew along on Shiva for several ocean passages. I recall one guy who I think said he was a sailor and a commercial Jet pilot. He was seasick most of the time! On the other hand I took fiends of friends who were sailors and were fabulous. I totally loved having them aboard and these guys became friends and some have done the passage with me several times. So maybe I was lucky. You never know.

SLV is mixed crew on a difficult mission to sail the Atlantic West to East in late November. Greta and her dad clearly are no much use as far as sailing goes. The infant is a liability of course and takes the attention of his mother who should have been able to assist in sailing. They picked up Nikki who is an experienced young strong positive person with lots of ocean miles. I doubt they did any MOB rehearsals before departing or practice setting their sails etc. I don't know what sort of preparation was done for the voyage. My impression is not much... but I have not followed the vlog. I know on my passages we did drills and have pre departure meetings and coordinated the provisioning and stowing etc. Crossing the ocean is serious business and if you have crew which you need to work together... it's best if they work well together.

What are your thoughts about crew and prep for an ocean passage?
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