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post #21 of 34 Old 02-22-2020
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Re: Selling your boat

I like my boat, but don’t LOVE it. I like cruising and sailing, but again wouldn't say I LOVE.

I have a plan to sell the boat and move on to other things before I physically break down. I just haven't set any kind of date for this yet.
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post #22 of 34 Old 02-22-2020
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Re: Selling your boat

I like my boat. What I love is the lifestyle. My boat enables this lifestyle, but there are other ways to achieve the same things. So, I have no plans to sell, but to paraphrase one of the greats (Lin Pardey):

I'll keep cruising as long as it's fun ... or until something better comes along.

Why go fast, when you can go slow.
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post #23 of 34 Old 02-22-2020
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Re: Selling your boat

Back to Capta's question: when buying my boats, I sort of think about what happens when I don't want the boat anymore (too old, too bored, too dead, etc.). I determined that I wouldn't pay more for the boat than I would mind losing completely. I don't intend to die aboard, but I can't imagine not having a boat.
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post #24 of 34 Old 02-24-2020
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Re: Selling your boat

interesting topic. here's my take....I don't think of it as a boat. I think of it as boats, with a big S on the end. We love our current boat. bought her to sail the ocean, which we did and she did with style. We've used her much more than any other boat we saw in the places we've been to. Fixed her up too...spared no expense. But we're done with the ocean so she's on the market for someone else to do ocean. but we're now maniacally looking for another trailer sailor to sail our lake and anyplace else. Also looking to charter Croatia later in the year. So, done with coastal and crossing oceans so time for a new love.

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post #25 of 34 Old 02-26-2020
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Re: Selling your boat

Bought my Capri 14.2 thought I'd have it forever, had it for 10 years.
Bought my Capri 22, and almost bought a capri 25 when I did... I spent all my ownership days wondering about selling the 22.

I finally bought a Capri 25, and loved that boat, put a ton of work in it, spent most of my time thinking about what I would do if I wanted to upgrade to something bigger. Wasn't sure anything bigger would work since I was on a lake that meant we had to be able to haul it ourselves and step the mast ourselves. I considered a lot of boats, Benteau 285 made the list, as did a Catalina 27 Tall. Ironically I bought an S2 7.9 mostly to prove I could be competitive with the boat the biggest winnners of our club racing used. I did well with that boat.

I was never happy with the S2, if felt boring to me. Ironic, it was a very fast boat.

I sold the S2, thinking I'd get a J27 or J92... Nothing fit it all fell through. I wound up buying a Wavelength 24, and it was probably the best setup boat I owned. Every month I owned it, even when I was winning races, I wanted somethign different... never thought I'd be able to sell it, but I knew I wanted to.

Flash forward, I own an C&C 32, I love the boat, and its what I wanted, and I bought it for as long as I am on the lake. I am tweaking it for me, but I know the resale on the C&C is good, so getting rid of it should be really easy

Freedom, a 1983 C&C 32 sailing Smith Mountain Lake, VA
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post #26 of 34 Old 02-26-2020
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Re: Selling your boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by SHNOOL View Post
Bought my Capri 14.2 thought I'd have it forever, had it for 10 years.
Bought my Capri 22, and almost bought a capri 25 when I did... I spent all my ownership days wondering about selling the 22.

I finally bought a Capri 25, and loved that boat, put a ton of work in it, spent most of my time thinking about what I would do if I wanted to upgrade to something bigger. Wasn't sure anything bigger would work since I was on a lake that meant we had to be able to haul it ourselves and step the mast ourselves. I considered a lot of boats, Benteau 285 made the list, as did a Catalina 27 Tall. Ironically I bought an S2 7.9 mostly to prove I could be competitive with the boat the biggest winnners of our club racing used. I did well with that boat.

I was never happy with the S2, if felt boring to me. Ironic, it was a very fast boat.

I sold the S2, thinking I'd get a J27 or J92... Nothing fit it all fell through. I wound up buying a Wavelength 24, and it was probably the best setup boat I owned. Every month I owned it, even when I was winning races, I wanted somethign different... never thought I'd be able to sell it, but I knew I wanted to.

Flash forward, I own an C&C 32, I love the boat, and its what I wanted, and I bought it for as long as I am on the lake. I am tweaking it for me, but I know the resale on the C&C is good, so getting rid of it should be really easy
She’s big enough to keep on the Chessie and do some bigger sailing as well as spend weekend on her or take a couple vacations like we do each year.


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post #27 of 34 Old 02-26-2020
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Re: Selling your boat

If I ever became a solo cruiser I'd downsize to something in the 28-32 range. The perfect size for one, although I know a family of three who spends weeks a time on their C&C 32 and does just fine. Nice boats.
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post #28 of 34 Old 02-26-2020
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Re: Selling your boat

Of course ....it’s a C&C....😄😄😄😄🌪🌪🌪🌪
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post #29 of 34 Old 02-27-2020
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Re: Selling your boat

I know two people who called it quits when they realized they could never be independent again.

I hope I have that courage when I can no longer handle the boat myself as I have no interest in a life on dirt.

The hysterical laughter you hear as you drive a way in your"new" boat ..... is the seller.
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post #30 of 34 Old 02-27-2020
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Re: Selling your boat

The OP raises so many issues here. The main one I suppose is that everyone has a completely different set of circumstances, values, goals and how they chose to live their lives.

Most people follow most of the well worn paths in life... get an education, work which pays well enough to live well and save for a a future... which often means/includes passing assets / inheritance on to your offspring or partner, and money to pay for your lifestyle when you stop working for whatever reason. So most people maintain "investments" for this purpose.

A common element on SN is members incorporate sailing as a large component on their lives. And there are many ways to sail... day sailing, racing, weekend cruising, long term and distance cruising, part time use or full time live aboard and all manner of permutations. Some are professionals... run charters or are mechanics and so on. So clearly there is no right answer or path here... each one will be what works for each sailor and their circumstance. There will be common paths but likely no identical ones.

++++

I began sailing in mid life. I was essentially single as I had divorced and had no children. I was self employed and had made come money which sat in a bank. I was not thinking about heirs or even retirement at the time. My father had recently died after working his whole life without a retirement. Why wait until you're too old to do the things you want to do?

My "discovery" of sailing was complexly accidental. I had no exposure until very shortly before I bought Shiva which is the only boat I have ever owned and still do since August 1985. Since I was completely new... sailing seemed to me, at the time, like I was opening a door into a previously unseen and unknown universe/ It felt similar to how I felt as a college freshman entering architecture school to learn a profession I had chosen to do for my "work" in life. Like architecture... sailing would have to be "mastered". I loved the idea of taking in a new "discipline" and so "late" in life. I knew there was a lot to learn. So I began my studies which included books, and courses and of course real time experience with the boat I bought.

Clearly buying a "serious" boat without a knowledge base was risky. I had no experience to inform my decision... just books and advice from a trusted friend who sailed... and my own gut response to what I saw in the boat.

The decision included the idea of getting a boat I could:

aail single hand and therefore short hand
do well in ocean passages
comfortable to live aboard
afford to purchase, outfit and maintain

I spent Spring 85 and part of Summer looking until I found the 36s. I was in full learning mode. When I closed I was faced with hands on experience learning how to sail.... and what to do for upgrades.... I had to learn to care for a diesel... I was not someone who messed with cars or motorcycles. No interest in such things.

As the first years ticked off I was in a full immersion mode. I spent all my waking hours in learning mode aside from doing my work. And I realized how this boat was a perfect match for me. I suppose it's sort of like falling in love and getting hitched.

I realized that my social life would be radically different living on a boat and even more so in new and unfamiliar places. I wanted a partner to share the experience and be into it as much as I was. I knew this was a long shot... but I kept one eye open. When the decision was made for my "sabbatical" I left single and unattached. Pretty hard to hook up with a woman of the "right age" who was unencumbered and not into her career to take off and live on a sailboat. I did meet several interesting ladies along the way... but no "keepers" as expected.

My "sailing sabbatical" did not disappoint. I had all sorts of experiences I never would have had as an architect in NYC with a sailboat in LI. I met remarkable people and have great memories. I became a very competent sailor of MY boat. And I did some deliveries of other boats. Not something I enjoy as much as my own... but I made some money and chalked up experience.

I decided to "return" to civilization to pursue a business idea which came to me sitting in the cockpit of my then girlfriend's boat in the Canary Islands. It was a boat related idea and something that I needed to try to make happen but not in the Canary Islands.

I returned to NYC and lived aboard in LIS Sound, got a car and worked on the project development/business plan for about a year. I cruised locally and at one point almost sold the boat when it was on the hard in winter storage and I was living in a small apartment with my new GF who became my wife. Business plan did not get funded... and we decided to not sell and use the boat and have been doing so since the late 90s. Wifey is not a sailor and doesn't want to be. But she does love the boat, being on it and visiting places. It's our summer home, and our vacation.

I am so used to having this as part of my life... selling the boat would be like selling my left arm. I have had this boat half my life.... more than any other material thing I own... this boat as been with me.

I can sell the boat and get tens of thousands of dollars. I can't take them to the grave... wifey will get them if she outlives me as she likely will. Or she can sell the boat on my passing. As long as we can use and enjoy the boat we keep it as it's our home. And we do love being there.... and there is where ever the anchor sets.

I would the next owner/caretaker to be someone who appreciates and loves her as I have... though that is impossible. To next owner she will be just a well found and well cared for good sailing old sailboat. But who knows... maybe the next owner will fall in love as I did.

You don't sell what you love and what has "cared for" you for decades through calm seas and gales.

Love song for Shiva:

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pay attention... someone's life depends on it

Last edited by SanderO; 02-27-2020 at 06:58 AM.
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