Loose forestay - SailNet Community
 
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post #1 of 5 Old 04-17-2008 Thread Starter
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Loose forestay

I have a 13' Chrysler Pirateer that I sail around the small lake where I live. The boat is at least fifteen years old. When I tighten the turnbuckle to its max on the forestay, it is still loose. I guess the cable has stretched over the years. What is the best way to repair this? Is there a way to shorten the stay by reattaching the turnbuckle further up. Or do I detach it from the tang on the mast then spot weld it back on?
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post #2 of 5 Old 04-17-2008
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You could always cut the forestay at the swage, and use a swageless fitting, like a Hi-Mod, Norseman or StaLok to re-terminate the cable and attach it to the turnbuckle.

However, I think you need to find out if anything on the boat has changed, resulting in the excess slack of the forestay. Also, you need to check what the mast rake for the boat should be and make sure that the forestay isn't too short, or the sailplan won't balance properly.




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post #3 of 5 Old 04-17-2008
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Unless you've got the tools and expertise, this requires a professional. My advice is to locate a rigging shop in a marina near you and have them take a look at it and do the repair. Spot weld doesn't sound like a good idea.

Good luck!

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post #4 of 5 Old 04-18-2008
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Is the mast raked too far forward? If the backstay (or shrouds if you don't have one) is too loose, that would prevent you from tightening the forestay.
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post #5 of 5 Old 04-18-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slayer View Post
I have a 13' Chrysler Pirateer that I sail around the small lake where I live. The boat is at least fifteen years old. When I tighten the turnbuckle to its max on the forestay, it is still loose. I guess the cable has stretched over the years. What is the best way to repair this? Is there a way to shorten the stay by reattaching the turnbuckle further up. Or do I detach it from the tang on the mast then spot weld it back on?
You tighten the forestay by tightening the backstay...If the boat does not have a backstay, dont worry about the looseness of the forestay, the mainsheet should tighten the rig when going up wind. Consider shortening the forestay only if you have excessive curve in the luff (say more than 6 inches) when beating with the main trimmed tight. Shorteningthe forestay will move the sail center-of-effort forward and lessen weather helm/increase lee helm, so you want to consider the balance of the boat when beating before you look at pointing (ala a straight forestay).

Certified...in several regards...
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