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post #31 of 51 Old 06-06-2008
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Tiller between my legs most of the time, or controlling it with my foot. I rarely use a winch handle, and most of the time I bypass the winch altogether, depending on the wind I am sailing in. I also ALWAYS have stopper knots tied with the sheets running through the cleats. If it gets to be too much at times, I will often drop the jib/genny and fly under main alone. I find it to be a whole lot easier to handle, especially for a beginner singlehanding when there is a lot of marina traffic.
Being a beginner sailor, I try to mostly give everything a try to see what flows well for me. I singlehand a lot, so this thread has been pretty interesting, to see the way that other people do it.

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post #32 of 51 Old 06-06-2008
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knothead View Post
The brass was deburred and has been on the boat for over 15 yrs. so it's pretty smooth to the touch. It's easily removable but I've never taken it off. If I want to get it out of the way I just need to slide the hatch back an inch or two. It's on the hatch for the aft cabin and I usually don't go down there much while sailing.

It works great for a Nor'Sea 27', but as SD says it's definitely not for many boats.

Steve
I am still scheming around this a bit. If you can imagine a bow shaped plank (like from a bow and arrow) somehow attached to my stern with notches in it, that would work and it would still leave the bench open. Rip a few thin strips of white oak and glue them together as an arch. Hmmm...
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post #33 of 51 Old 06-06-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arbarnhart View Post
I am still scheming around this a bit. If you can imagine a bow shaped plank (like from a bow and arrow) somehow attached to my stern with notches in it, that would work and it would still leave the bench open. Rip a few thin strips of white oak and glue them together as an arch. Hmmm...

Andy,
I've always been of the mind that if I had an idea that I wanted to try out on my boat. What better place?
In the case of my tiller comb. If it hadn't worked out, the worst I would have been left with is two holes in my aft cabin hatch, (and a whole lot of wasted hacksawing and filing),
Some questioned my decision to add a boom gallows. But it has worked and been an asset, in my opinion, to the boat for as long as it's been there. And that's been well over a decade.

Since I don't have a showroom yacht, but rather a sturdy and somewhat spartan little campin... I mean cruising boat. I don't have to worry too much about leaving a screw hole or two.

But that's just me and the type of boat I have.
If I had a new or fairly new yacht that I had bought from a dealer, and there were still things on board that were under some sort of warranty, ...well then I wouldn't go around drilling too many holes in my transom.

Steve
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post #34 of 51 Old 06-06-2008
 
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Steve,

That is where I am to some degree with my boat with one major wrinkle. I have decided to do a pretty full refurb. I am going to repair all the deck surface cracks, fill and fair all the little dings (there are no major ones) on the deck, sides and bottom and repaint. Before I do this, I am doing some additional fitting out. The N17 is a pretty basic boat. It has a lot going for it if you have to limit yourself to very small boats that can do some short coastal cruising. It's light enough to tow with just about anything, can launch/beach in very shallow water, the mast can easily be stepped by one person and it has good sailing character. Search around and you will see what I mean. But back to it being basic. I am looking at other boats and thinking about things I really wish I had and then deciding if it is something I can do. When I do the the fairing and painting, some things that I have done in wood are going to get a coat of epoxy and paint and look like fiberglass (shhh! ). This might be one of those things...
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post #35 of 51 Old 06-06-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arbarnhart View Post
Steve,

That is where I am to some degree with my boat with one major wrinkle. I have decided to do a pretty full refurb. I am going to repair all the deck surface cracks, fill and fair all the little dings (there are no major ones) on the deck, sides and bottom and repaint. Before I do this, I am doing some additional fitting out. The N17 is a pretty basic boat. It has a lot going for it if you have to limit yourself to very small boats that can do some short coastal cruising. It's light enough to tow with just about anything, can launch/beach in very shallow water, the mast can easily be stepped by one person and it has good sailing character. Search around and you will see what I mean. But back to it being basic. I am looking at other boats and thinking about things I really wish I had and then deciding if it is something I can do. When I do the the fairing and painting, some things that I have done in wood are going to get a coat of epoxy and paint and look like fiberglass (shhh! ). This might be one of those things...

The first boat that Mrs. Knothead and I sailed was a little West Wight Potter we named "Delta Dwarf". (She says it was 12' I'm thinking 13' but who's counting). We used a trolling motor and would camp out on that boat for the weekends and sail many miles on the San Joaquin river.

We had a great time on that little boat.... wink, wink

I still get the impression sometimes that people with the smallest boats are usually the happiest.

And I would never fault a man for reducing his bright work load.

We must think alike.

Steve
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post #36 of 51 Old 06-06-2008
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Sorry Arbarnhart, we're on to you...and we're just going to have to burn you at the stake.... what you're suggesting is heresy.... Actually, I'm a much bigger fan of sailing than varnishing, and am trying to get rid of all the external wood on my boat.
Quote:
Originally Posted by arbarnhart View Post
Steve,

That is where I am to some degree with my boat with one major wrinkle. I have decided to do a pretty full refurb. I am going to repair all the deck surface cracks, fill and fair all the little dings (there are no major ones) on the deck, sides and bottom and repaint. Before I do this, I am doing some additional fitting out. The N17 is a pretty basic boat. It has a lot going for it if you have to limit yourself to very small boats that can do some short coastal cruising. It's light enough to tow with just about anything, can launch/beach in very shallow water, the mast can easily be stepped by one person and it has good sailing character. Search around and you will see what I mean. But back to it being basic. I am looking at other boats and thinking about things I really wish I had and then deciding if it is something I can do. When I do the the fairing and painting, some things that I have done in wood are going to get a coat of epoxy and paint and look like fiberglass (shhh! ). This might be one of those things...



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post #37 of 51 Old 06-06-2008
 
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Actually, the little Potter model is the "15", but that is because they included the pulpit and the rudder when they measured (I am not making this up). That was/is a very cool little boat and people have made some amazing voyages in it. The N17 has some similarities, but is quite a bit larger. It is actually 17' 8" from bow to stern (measuring fiberglass, not air ). It is shallow draft with a swing keel, doesn't weigh a lot but doesn't fall over easy and usually pops back up if it does (much like the Potter). The N17 does have a massive cockpit with one drain so pooping is more of a concern. But I am not planning any crossings. Besides, I have searched pretty extensively for N17 capsize stories and not found any. I did find a guy who tried to knock his over on purpose in 30+ knot winds and failed and another guy who tried to sail his (actually a borrowed one) to the Bahamas and succeeded.
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post #38 of 51 Old 12-18-2017
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Re: Singlehanding...

Quote:
Originally Posted by merlin2375 View Post
I have some experience singlehanding but whenever I was out alone, I only sailed with the main. Now, I want to go out and sail the boat with both a mainsail and a headsail. My question for you guys it how do you deal with the tiller and sheets through maneuvers.

I am talking about monohulls without self-tacking equipment. So let's say you execute a tack or gybe. Do you deal with the mainsail then get the boat steady on its new heading then let go of the tiller to deal with the headsail?

Any tips or tricks? The two scenarios I'm thinking of are:

Singlehanding: Alone
Singlehanding: There are others on the boat but they are not sailors. Do you teach them what to do?
You get your control line all to the cockpit; get your lines ergonomically situated for your body:
sit there an think about yourself hauling various lines from the helming position, what fits YOUR body & range of motion.
so you can comfortably and safely control the boat's sailing controls all right from the cockpit area.
run the mainsheet, the boom vang, and the topping lift all centrally, on the boom if posible,
Then you can hold/control the tiller & mainsheet in your back hand
You have your for'd hand to work the jib sheets, and also the vang, the out haul, or topping lift to depower when a gust hits,
and they are also there just at the ready to power up in an instant,all from right where you are helming solo.

When you are comfortable controlling your baby solo, you can invite folks an let 'em feel like they are helpin but you are confidently in control !
a song I remember once said, "the canvas can do miracles" this is SO true, & so much more true when you can do all the controls by yourself confidently and comfortably.
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post #39 of 51 Old 12-19-2017
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Re: Singlehanding...

While I agree with most of the post above, I would like to comment on a few of the points as follows:
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonBland View Post
"run the mainsheet, the boom vang, and the topping lift all centrally, on the boom if possible"
I suggest that having the controls on the boom only works on very small boats and that its more convenient to have these controls on the deck or cabin so they can be adjusted even when the boom has been eased out on a reach or run.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DonBland View Post
Then you can hold/control the tiller & mainsheet in your back hand
If you are laying out your controls from scratch, (which few of us ever get to do) I suggest that it is more ideal to have all of the frequently adjusted controls forward of where you sit to steer. This allow you to face forward and look at your sails and the line that you are adjusting while you are making adjustments. While it is not always possible to do, It generally works better with human physiology to have your body front facing the control line that you are pulling on. Pulling across the body or parallel to the shoulders each increase the strain on the body and use your muscles less efficiently.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DonBland View Post
You have your for'd hand to work the jib sheets, and also the vang, the out haul, or topping lift to depower when a gust hits.
For single-handing I prefer to set up the topping lift at a length that it never has to be adjusted. What is not mentioned but which is possibly more important, the traveler control lines should be within easy reach of the helmsman and on a fractional rig, the backstay adjuster should be readily in reach and convenient to use. If you expect to be on a leg a long time in gusty conditions, it can be very helpful to cross sheet the jibsheets as well.

Jeff
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post #40 of 51 Old 12-19-2017
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Re: Singlehanding...

It's all here: https://youtu.be/-bnNCFg83tM?t=49

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