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post #361 of 3327 Old 10-07-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bestfriend View Post
Sorry guys, I got busy at work. That is "Aspect computing" in the 1998 Sydney to Hobart race. 70 knot winds, higher gusts, 54ft boat. Not a comment on anyone's story, just a picture.

Sway, you don't see the tops blowing off because the wind had been blowing so hard for such a long period that it is flattening the waves.

Conditions, demographics, it all matters. Read the books on the race and you will learn a lot about how the sea works when multiple forces, both air and water, combine in in a tight space. Also read Willard Bascom's books on waves.

As far as first hand experience, there is much to be said about whats underwater and the topography around you. In the Bay here, you can get your ass kicked in 30+ knot winds with basically minor waves, maybe six feet at the very most. The wind can feel like its gonna rip your ears off, and your sails too. Then you can go out the gate in 15-20 knot winds, and the seas can be twice that height, and sometimes it feels safer. A completely different experience and it can even be on the same day!
For whatever reason, those do not appear to me to be seas associated with 70 knot winds...in fact, not even close. Now I am referring to open waters with significant fetch and I'm unaware of where the photo was taken and what the actual conditions were at the time of the photo versus worst reported. But rather than just rain on anyone's parade, I've taken the trouble to dig up some NOAA photos as an example of sea state under the Beaufort scale. 70 knots is Force 12 and I think you'll agree that what the NOAA photo shows as Force 12 conditions looks rather different than the photo posted by our bestfriend.

Beaufort Wind Force Scale and Sea State


Last edited by sailaway21; 10-07-2008 at 02:19 AM.
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post #362 of 3327 Old 10-07-2008
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So now it's a big freaking wave thread.

17 Years of sea duty during my 22 in the Navy, deployed or out of port 2/3 of that time.
I've seen some waves and I'm here to tell you the 30 foot jobbers with breaking crests break destroyers and frigates and dent the big boys.
We had a med-evac off the USS Will Rogers in 1982 in 30+ waves, 62kts predicated wind, as the radioman on board the boat I got the weather reports so I'm pretty freaking sure of what it was.
Round bottom submarine meets 30+ breakers - free board is more than a sailboat and ballast was pumped up to max it out. We had breaking waves bow to stern so big our 30 foot up conning tower was wetter than the girls shower room and awash in puke and snot. The dive planes, half way up the tower were banging up and down, flexed by the force of the water hitting them. I was in the tower, doing the radio thing with the helicopter.
After 5 tries to extract and 10 minutes from bingo (no return fuel) the skipper made the decision, took the near lifeless body of our crewmate and tossed him off on the outgoing wave, into the arms of those angels of mercy we call rescue swimmers.
Our conning crew took 3 cuts (28 stitches) lost 2 teeth, and one broken arm bouncing around in the steel and teak bathtub, I got lucky and only bruised up. Throughout the crew we took a few more injuries, but I don't remember them all. We were on the surface 45 minutes total time.

Call your Merda De Boi boys, I have no pictures and can't even tell you where we were on what day. I have my memories, and they suffice.

Big waves and big winds are for idiots and the lucky few who get caught and survive.
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post #363 of 3327 Old 10-07-2008
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Yeah, but you had the option of ducking under the waves once you get the guy off and med-evaced... Sailboats don't have that option...




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post #364 of 3327 Old 10-07-2008
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Quote:
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Yeah, but you had the option of ducking under the waves once you get the guy off and med-evaced... Sailboats don't have that option...
Ha, sailboats have that option, it's called sinking. Sinking is easy when the hatches have been ripped off, mast and rigging are ripped apart and become hole making pikes and steel cable saws and bulkheads are buckling inward under 20 ton waves.

The difference is comfort - submarines sink comfortably
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post #365 of 3327 Old 10-07-2008
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Jody, I don't want to critical about your video. If I was in the cockpit I would NOT clip onto the stern rail. I would find a center point in the cockpit to clip to. If you are cliped on the rail you can go over the side and be pulled along by the boat. If you have a 12 foot beam and 6 foot tether and cliped on the center line you can't go over either side..

Also your harness should be on the outside of your jacket. 2 reasons 1) the quick release would be at hand. 2) if you do go over the side that jacket is going to be turned inside out over your face before you can release.

Last edited by bubb2; 10-07-2008 at 08:22 AM.
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post #366 of 3327 Old 10-07-2008
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LOL... BTW, not all submarines sink comfortably...
Quote:
Originally Posted by chucklesR View Post
Ha, sailboats have that option, it's called sinking. Sinking is easy when the hatches have been ripped off, mast and rigging are ripped apart and become hole making pikes and steel cable saws and bulkheads are buckling inward under 20 ton waves.

The difference is comfort - submarines sink comfortably



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—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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The difference is comfort - submarines sink comfortably
Untill they implode, but I guess you never feel that!~!!
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post #368 of 3327 Old 10-07-2008
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While the 1998 sydney-hobart race did have winds up to hurricane force, there is nothing associated with that particular photo that says it was taken at the time or place in the race where such winds were happening. To me it looks like 50 or so which is certainly bad enough...but it is simply not crazy enough to be 70 in open water in my opinion.

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post #369 of 3327 Old 10-07-2008
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O.K., you studs that only go out in gale warnings – fess up, what kind of gear do you break. The repair bill for Fast Forward’s broach was $11 grand (30knots true). I have also blown out a main when it was only blowing in the thirties. Usually when things go non-linear, the last thing you break out is a camera so I have precious few photos of Freya in a blow. So after seeing CC’s photo, how fast is the wind here? (Hint: the wind was southerly for the Bay (about 253 degrees and blowing strait from the City so assume ten miles of fetch.)


That is the big question. I raced last year over Labor Day weekend in 25-30 knots of wind gusting to 35+. Seas were 8 ft. Ugly, Square, Lake MI piles of chop with a few 10 footers thrown in for good measure. We were sailing with a new 145% genny reefed down to < 100% and the mizzen, doused main. The rest of the boats in our division retired early except for 1. That 1 required the CG to come save his bacon after the mast went by the board. We ended up blowing one of the seams out of the genny and having the cleat for the furling line ripped out of the coaming.

I do like the sea stories everyone is laying out there in this thread (thanks smacky) but, when I hear of joy rides in 30 kts of wind on a boat with wood spars and old sails and no reports of damage it kinda makes ya go, Hmmmmm.
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blt - great pictures from the race. I hope Sdog didn't look at how bad that tri got humiliated. Ha! It looks like it was definitely a spanker out there. I'm glad you got yours home in one piece. BTW - is your moniker an homage to Blutarski? That fine specimen of a human being in "Animal House"? I like it.

George - now I'm all confused. I've just been taking the mph readings and dividing them by 1.15 (or multiplying when they make me look tougher). Now you're throwing in all this squared stuff. Ouch. I guess I have to go buy a hummuna-hummuna-meter - or whatever. I'm so confused I can't even guess at the windspeed in your photo - maybe between 10 and 40? As for repair costs - ppphhhhttth. I've invested heavily in the stock market - so I'm currently swimming in cash.

Jody - sweet BFS video dude! I especially like the wine bottle at the helm (nothin' better than a hammered skipper I always say), the brats on the barbie, and the "knockdown" at the end. Great visual effects. I'll have to take it on faith that you had a "stern look" on your face since I couldn't really see much under that balaclava. And, man, don't ya just hate it when you post photo-evidence and people start pointing out (rightly so) all the stuff you're doing wrong. I don't know if you remember - but I got some of that myself in FC. It's great learning from real sailors ain't it!

Sailaway - dude, you are just one uptight contrarian. They give you pictures - and you still go on and on. Jeez.

Chuckles - great story, and great comeback on Sdog. Thanks for your service.

Sdog - did you see blt's photos of the race? Dude, that tri!
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