Lubberly Gardening - SailNet Community
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post #1 of 12 Old 03-07-2010 Thread Starter
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Lubberly Gardening

My marina recently underwent a "beautification" which included a new bulkhead, and the destruction of a small vegetated area. It is currently full of two to five inch round stones, mud, gravel and clay.

The landlord didn't bother to re-vegetate the area, or put the fence or gate back up. Interested joggers going along the length of the waterfront, bicyclists, motorists and others periodically pull into the lot at my marina, which is a dead end, on private property, and look around, then leave. This is on the East side of Lake Union.

So people can simply hop onto the dock where my boat is, and take off with whatever they please. Last summer someone stole my dockmates dink.

What kind of plants should I plant to obscure physical and visual access to the dock?

I was thinking bamboo, or Olympic or Himalayan blackberries. Any good ideas for a bush that is people proof?
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post #2 of 12 Old 03-07-2010 Thread Starter
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I need an impenetrable thicket.

I need a thicket. A bundle of plant life so unfriendly and tangled that it looks like the matted locks of a heavily dreadlocked white rasta eco hippy terrorist. Help me. It needs to grow fast.
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post #3 of 12 Old 03-07-2010
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We're missing critical information about the climate of your area that would allow us to suggest the appropriate plants that could survive at your location.
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post #4 of 12 Old 03-07-2010 Thread Starter
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Seattle. Summer has nice long days, hottest temperature ever was 104. Rarely in the 90s even during summer. Plenty of rainfall. Clay and mud thick soil. Freezes during winter, usually for a month or less. Lowest temperatures in winter around 20.
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post #5 of 12 Old 03-07-2010
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Obscuring the crime may make it easier. Instead, plant a sign that says the following:

"Can you run 955 feet per second? If not and I catch you taking something from my boat, you better be bulletproof."
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post #6 of 12 Old 03-07-2010
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Blackberry or Raspberry brambles. Pretty much impregnable and you get to eat em in the fall.
They grow fast too. Especially if you give them compost from your composting head.
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post #7 of 12 Old 03-07-2010
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You might try Prycantha, Barberry, some oregon grape is large tall enough. Rubus sp work too, ie blackberry. Of course the absolute worst would be Oplopanax horridus. A small groove would slow most down. Nettles might work too!

For ease on your boat, any other plant such as bammboo, or even a smaller maple, cedar etc would work.

Marty

Ps so you do not have to look Oplopanax horridus, look up devels club!

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post #8 of 12 Old 03-07-2010
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I'd second Prycantha or Barberry. From an article on home intrusion prevention.

Quote:
Planting a bush or shrub near windows that are possible entry points can be a big deterrent for potential intruders. There are many potential thorny shrubs or bushes that can be used for your landscaping. Three of these are Berberis, Rosa Rugosa, and Pyracantha.

A berberis bush is also known as a Pepperidge bush or barberry. There are over 400 species of this shrub which all have thorny shoots making it perfect choice for secure landscaping. Berberis plants have leaves that vary from 1 - 10 centimeters long with thorns. Some species have leaves that will turn color and fall while others remain green all year long. Different species will produce either flowers or berries. Both forms of this plant are a beautiful addition to any home landscaping. Consider the color of the flower or berry to determine whether it will be a good fit for your home landscaping.

Rosa rugosa is also known as Japanese Rose, Ramanas Rose, or Rugas Rose. This plant is from eastern Asia and is a common ornamental plant in North America. Rosa rugosa grows very dense with tall stems and straight thorns. It will grow to 1 - 1.5 meters tall. It has large leaves and produces flowers that range from white to dark pink in color. This shrub will bloom in later summer or autumn with a sweet scent. Other common names for this plant are saltspray rose and beach rose.

Pyracantha, also known as Firethorn, is a very common plant used in gardens and landscaping. It is originally from Asia but many hybrid varieties have been developed since its introduction to North America. This evergreen shrub grows very tall with thorny leaves. A white flower typically is produced by firethorn accompanied with berries in varied tones of yellow, orange or red.



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post #9 of 12 Old 03-07-2010
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If one looks at Rosa sp, then rugosa, nootakensis, or any of the bush hybrids would work too. I was at a clients yesterday, her bush roses were 4' diam!

Take a ramble thru Swansons in Ballard for some idea's, Sky in Shoreline is a bit cheaper cost wise. THere used to be one in Georgetown near the north end of boeing field.

Marty

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post #10 of 12 Old 03-07-2010 Thread Starter
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MMMM. I totally forgot about raspberries. I am thinking a mix of himalayan blackberries, raspberries, and olympic blackberries, maybe even some wild blackberries in the mix... this could be a delicious and dangerous garden! The perfect impenetrable edible fence!
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