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jdham137 04-13-2011 11:26 AM

Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
I'm looking to upgrade to a bluewater sailboat but want to keep it in the sub 30' range, preferably 27 or 28 feet with an inboard diesel. I'd like a full keel and something that is possibly trailerable since I'm in the military and move often. When I say trailerable I mean demasted and craned on, not floated on. I like the style of the Cape Dory 27s. Even though I'll be doing some serious sailing, i don't need anything bigger than that. Is there anything else out there like that? Thanks for any advice.

jdham137 04-13-2011 11:27 AM

Also, my budget is just under $10,000 so I'll of course be looking at used and older.

cb32863 04-13-2011 11:29 AM

Various "bluewater" boats here. Some in your size range. There is also a book called "20 small sailboats to take you anywhere." Pretty cheap at Amazon.


Good luck. :cool:

JVallely 04-13-2011 11:30 AM

Maybe a Southern Cross 28?

cb32863 04-13-2011 11:32 AM

Your budget may be a bit tight as most folks say you need about an extra 20% for refitting and "stuff".

tomperanteau 04-13-2011 12:25 PM

Blue water boats in the $10,000 range will be hard to find in any length.

There are other choices out there that are not what you might consider traditional blue water boats, but they are nonetheless capable. It's good to read up on as many blue water travelers and the boats they sailed in as you can.

MarkCK 04-13-2011 01:32 PM

You might look at a Tartan 27. They are not traditional lblue water boats in the cape dory mold but have done many offshore passages. Also they are a dime a dozen relatively speaking.

nolatom 04-13-2011 02:11 PM

Albin 27

JohnRPollard 04-13-2011 02:31 PM

The price point is tough. But some other boats in the size range are the Westsail 28 and Pacific Seacraft Orion 27. In addition to the 27, Cape Dory has a 28' model.

If you don't mind going smaller, a Pacific Seacraft 25 could be more in your price range and might be worth a look. Here is another much more expensive example, but it gives an idea of how they can be spruced up. Note that price includes the tandem trailer.

Barquito 04-13-2011 02:42 PM

Bluewater is a relative thing. If you just want to skip down to the islands, but, not across the pond... maybe a Bristol 27 or Pearson 28 (basically the same boat). The B27's do tend to have either Atomic 4 gas motors or even outboards installed in a lazerett.
Also, James Baldwin has a great site and lists his ideas for a small cruiser.

Atom Voyages | Voyages Aboard the Sailboat Atom -* Good Old Boats List - choosing a* small voyaging sailboat

Skipper Jer 04-13-2011 03:03 PM

The $10K budget isn't going to get you a Nor'sea 27 on a trailer. Triple the 10K then you are in the game. Nor'sea's have circumnavigated.

Edit: Do you have at least a 3/4 ton truck to pull the boat?

Cruiser2B 04-13-2011 04:02 PM

I would think a pearson Triton or even an Alberg 30, which is trailerable, would work. These boats are plenty strong and most in your price range will need some TLC but it will allow you to do the boat the way you want. Albin Vega 27 seems like a stout boat as well. I personally have an Alberg 30 and I am speaking from the research I did when looking for the same type of boat. These were the boats recommended to me. Check out sailfar.net as well
I did alot of looking and reasearching about my Alberg for under 5k and sailed it home 200nm, yes she needs work but I think the deals are out there.

mikel1 04-13-2011 04:16 PM

Ericson 27 (one used to hold the record from San Fransisco to Japan)...I have mine for sale east coast (Rhode Island) ....

bljones 04-13-2011 04:31 PM

The 10K budget is the tough part, but two come to mind- Halman Horizon and
Westerly Centaur.

johnnyandjebus 04-13-2011 06:54 PM

As already mentioned check out James Baldwin's site. I would add the contessa 26 to the list, but it is small, even for a 26' footer so it may not fit your needs
The Contessa Corner - A site for Contessa owners, sailors and dreamers.

I would argue that most if not all Carl Alberg designed boats 30 ft and smaller are candidates.
Carl Alberg's Yacht Designs

John

thehardaground 04-13-2011 06:56 PM

Vancouver 27, but good luck finding one for under $10k

sidney777 04-13-2011 08:52 PM

Vancouver 25 : One person's offshore sailboat is another's NOT an offshore boat. Take a look at Mahina website, Atom voyages site, Westerly sailboats, and the book "Upgrading the offshore sailboat" and and other books about offshore, bluewater sailboats. And this unexpected entry; Hunter 27 offshore sailing??? - SailboatOwners.com
Re: Hunter 27 offshore sailing???

If any 27-footer could be safe in heavy seas then a Cherubini 27(Hunter of certain yrs)of a would be that boat. I doubt any 27 was built heavier. Still it was not ever meant as an offshore boat. There is the deck-stepped mast, the plastic windows, and a less than stout steering system.

CBSanford 04-13-2011 08:53 PM

I know of Coronado 25's that have transited to Hawaii and further. There are many Catalina 27's that have done serious "blue water" work. If you are in the military and have limited time, I assume that you really mean to do coastal cruising. These boats can be had from $2500 to $10,000. BTW I have been offshore in storms in my Coronado 25 when we were viewing greento clear water out of the windows (we were essentially underwater)... but never blue. Above deck, I really did not notice the colors at the time... Greys.. Greygreen, Whites, foam... no blue.

landmineop 04-13-2011 11:15 PM

There is a Westerly Centaur in St. Pete with a deisel in your price range. Listed on sailboatlistings dot com. Not sure where you are but it may be worth a look.

Memopad 04-14-2011 12:48 PM

I'm trying to sell my International Folkboat ;) It's 26ft, a few have gone around the globe. My boat was an inboard but the engine has been removed. Now has an electric start outboard on the back. The boat is in good condition, the sails could use some work. I used them last summer and they work fine but new ones would be great. Also comes with a trailer. Asking $3500, I don't need two boats!

I'd use a lift or crane for getting the boat on the trailer. If you can weld, and afternoons work on the trailer would let you float it off easily. The rear supports are currently too high and aft to do that. A friend and myself raised to mast with a ginpole easy enough, could probably do without the pole i don't think it was helping. When we took the mast down he used the spin halyard, turned around the bowcleat, and lowered the mast while i walked it back. Took 5 minutes.

Barquito 04-14-2011 02:52 PM

Alberg designed most of his boats in a fashion after the Folkboat (Bristol 27, Pearson Triton). Long keel with attached rudder, narrow beam.

Momopad - Is your Folkboat more tender without the weight of the motor down low?

JimPendoley 04-14-2011 05:02 PM

Pearson Vanguard aws Inexpensive Bluewater Cruiser
 
I only have coastal sailing experieince, but I know of many Vanguards (32 feet)that have made much longer voyages. Three young college grads circumnavigated in one a few years back. Phil Rhodes was the designer and he was one of the best. It is a stoughtly built but easy on the eyes CCA design. I know for a fact you could buy one close to ready to go for 10K. Frequently appear on ebay and there are always some on yachtworld. There is also an extremely active users group on Yahoogroups.

Watch for wet core under the decks, will prolly come with a gas atomic 4 engine, but its a good and quite safe design. Ice box needs upgrading, tankage is only 40 gallons but thats doable.
Sails well off the wind, slower into it and you beat at 55 degrees to the wind

I have the dinette layout and opinions vary widely on whether it is more comfortable than the standard aft galley layout, but I can tell you I have lived aboard (winter too, I insulated) in New England for seven years and it has been quite comfortable.

jdham137 04-14-2011 05:35 PM

Wow, thanks for all the replies! My plans are to to some very serious sailing in about 8 or nine years when the kids are out of college. I've only done coastal cruising in the gulf of Mexico about 45 miles off shore but want to someday sail across the Atlantic to the med for a couple years then maybe circumnavigate spending time in china, Thailand, Korea, and Japan. My timeline will give me plenty of time to find the boat I want at a price I can afford and get it ready and get myself ready to do some serious sailing. I'm a fan of the rugged individualist sailing style of Lynn and Larry pardey and will emulate them much as I can. I plan to keep everything as simple as possible to make a small boat feasible. Thanks for the advice and if anyone has anything else to add please do so.

John David

Memopad 04-15-2011 06:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Barquito (Post 720495)
Alberg designed most of his boats in a fashion after the Folkboat (Bristol 27, Pearson Triton). Long keel with attached rudder, narrow beam.

Momopad - Is your Folkboat more tender without the weight of the motor down low?

I don't have anything to compare it to, but i don't think so. I think the majority of the folkboats weren't built as inboards anyway. The boat likes to heel a bit but once it hits 20-30 degrees it just stops and becomes steady as a rock. I've never sailed a boat that tracks anything like the folkboat. Hands off the tiller 30 minutes at a time with no change in course, i love it.

Indevolatile 04-16-2011 04:29 AM

I'd keep an eye out for an old Columbia 24 or 29, both of which have circumnavigated. They tend to be a bit lesser known than the Albergs or Pearsons, but just as solid. In fact, the dimensions of the S&S designed 29 are almost identical to that of the Alberg 30 and Triton.

I'm currently on the lookout for a C-29 myself, preferably a raised-deck model.

omaho5 04-16-2011 09:15 AM

I'm partial to CD 27. That said, you will be paying somewhat more than 10K.
CD also makes a 22 and a 25D, both excellent boats. I own a CD22 and love it.

tomperanteau 04-16-2011 08:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Indevolatile (Post 720951)
I'd keep an eye out for an old Columbia 24 or 29, both of which have circumnavigated. They tend to be a bit lesser known than the Albergs or Pearsons, but just as solid. In fact, the dimensions of the S&S designed 29 are almost identical to that of the Alberg 30 and Triton.

I'm currently on the lookout for a C-29 myself, preferably a raised-deck model.

The old Columbias were well-built unless you get into the mid 1970's. Although some will tell you that those are built, too.

I have a 1969 C36 that is a Crealock design and is very sturdy and fast. She's been back and forth to Hawaii a number of time, but not on my watch. I had to install a new holding tank vent, and I when drilling I noted that the hull was around 3/8" and that was way above the waterline. They used woven fiberglass mat, which I think also added to the strength.

LakeSuperiorGeezer 04-19-2011 04:36 PM

It's rare to find a sailboat with trailer in the 27 foot range. So, what you need to do is buy the trailer first, something to haul it home with. Be careful to get one made for salt water with aluminum or galvanized frame, and galvanized brakes and fittings. If you want to launch without a crane, get the bunk type. Most sailboat trailers are adjustable and are not custom made to a particular boat. For 27 to 28 footer you will need a trailer good for about 7500 pounds of sailboat, maybe a little more. The trailer and some boating items will be about 1700 pounds, so the truck should be up to towing 9200 pounds or maybe more. This requires at least a 3/4 ton with a larger engine. Check online to make sure what you have is up to the job. The owner’s manual will also tell you what the tow limits are. Get something with a trailer package. The trailer used is going to take about a third of your budget.

Mark F 04-20-2011 01:59 AM

Hi John David,

There is a Nor'Sea for sale in the Monterey Bay area. It's got an unusual rig but the price is right. Home Page

tomperanteau 04-20-2011 10:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mark F (Post 722047)
Hi John David,

There is a Nor'Sea for sale in the Monterey Bay area. It's got an unusual rig but the price is right. Home Page

Wow, and what appears to be an honest seller.

SpcAlan1 04-20-2011 01:33 PM

What about an Islander 30ft ?

solarwindsailor 09-19-2014 02:20 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
So I found the list of 20 small boats. Here

Small boat specifications


What does safety at sea numbers mean? Is higher more safe and lower less safe?

Delezynski 09-19-2014 03:25 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
Other Nor'Sea 27 owners are in the military now.

Keep looking for what you want and don't settle for something to just get by with.

But then, Jill and I own and cruise a Nor'Sea 27

Greg

http://www.svguenevere.com/photos/a04.jpg

miatapaul 09-19-2014 03:38 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by solarwindsailor (Post 2205577)
So I found the list of 20 small boats. Here

Small boat specifications


What does safety at sea numbers mean? Is higher more safe and lower less safe?

Safety at sea is simply a ranking in order of these specific boats. So he feels the Bristol Cutter is the safest boat on his list and the Catalina 27 is the least. But you just woke a long slumbering thread out of a 3 plus year sleep.

If you are remotely interested in a small seaworthy boat, it is a good read. John Vigor is a good writer and this dry text is a good read because of it. though I don't understand why the Hunter 260 was added to this list, as it was not in the book.

solarwindsailor 09-19-2014 04:38 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
LOL Hunter boats are a good way to remake "ALL is lost" at sea in the middle of no where. When it sinks one quickly can get on the life raft and then burn that down too lol.

I agree Hunter should not be on that list.

Quote:

Originally Posted by miatapaul (Post 2205825)
Safety at sea is simply a ranking in order of these specific boats. So he feels the Bristol Cutter is the safest boat on his list and the Catalina 27 is the least. But you just woke a long slumbering thread out of a 3 plus year sleep.

If you are remotely interested in a small seaworthy boat, it is a good read. John Vigor is a good writer and this dry text is a good read because of it. though I don't understand why the Hunter 260 was added to this list, as it was not in the book.


krisscross 09-19-2014 05:28 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by solarwindsailor (Post 2205577)
What does safety at sea numbers mean? Is higher more safe and lower less safe?

The other way. Of that list, #1 is the safest boat on the list, at least based on design and craftsmanship.

Group9 09-19-2014 05:29 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
Tons of Cape Dory 27's around. If someone told me I was going to have to cross the Atlantic in a 27 footer, that's the one I would get.

killarney_sailor 09-19-2014 05:32 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
To a large extent you buy boats by the pound rather than the foot. That list has such a wide divergence of displacements (not to mention other factors) that it seems pretty much useless. The safety at sea ranking is basically meaningless. It is one guy's opinion who admits he has not desire to actually sail anywhere.

miatapaul 09-19-2014 06:49 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by solarwindsailor (Post 2206001)
LOL Hunter boats are a good way to remake "ALL is lost" at sea in the middle of no where. When it sinks one quickly can get on the life raft and then burn that down too lol.

I agree Hunter should not be on that list.

Hunter's are not bad at all, just the 260 makes no pretension of being anything more than a coastal cruiser and trailer-able boat. Of course the Catalina 27 is not either, but in the book he goes into it's shortcomings.

Quote:

Originally Posted by killarney_sailor (Post 2206345)
To a large extent you buy boats by the pound rather than the foot. That list has such a wide divergence of displacements (not to mention other factors) that it seems pretty much useless. The safety at sea ranking is basically meaningless. It is one guy's opinion who admits he has not desire to actually sail anywhere.

Yea, without reading the book, the list is kind of useless. I think he was really trying to get a boat for many different budgets, even those on a quite limited ones. I think he does a really good job of that, and in the book he describes the limitations. And the ranking was only a ranking among the boats he listed, with no formula, so boat number 2 is not twice as good as 4, but just he feels it is more seaworthy. He does go into some of the things that make it so but you have to read the book. The listing out of context is totally useless I agree. I also think his "seaworthy test" is completely useless, but it is only for small trailer-able boats, and I think that point was lost in the other discussion.

Another good book about smaller boats, abet a bit larger than in the above. Twenty Affordable Sailboats To Take You Anywhere by Gregg Nestor/

solarwindsailor 09-20-2014 01:05 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
I really like the Cape Dory 27, but there are Cape Dory 30's around too and look solid and have wonderful reviews. Totally made for bluewater and easily in you price range. Also the refit would not cost you an arm or a leg plus if needed it is small enough that you can trailer it home. Goodluck and best wishes!




Quote:

Originally Posted by jdham137 (Post 719954)
Also, my budget is just under $10,000 so I'll of course be looking at used and older.


vega1860 09-20-2014 02:59 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
Vigor's book is a good guide to boats in this class. Of course I am partial to the Vega but it is certainly not the only boat that would fit the bill. It may, however, be the best boat that fits the budget.

This summer I helped a friend connect with a seller here in Petersburg, Alaska. The boat was a Vega 27, asking price $3500 negotiable.

Three of us took her to Prince Rupert, BC and the new owner and I (His first boat) took her on her own bottom all the way to Port Townsend, WA, covering over 700nm. No problems with the boat.

You won't be seeing her, or boats like her, on the cover of Cruising World or SAIL magazine, but with new sails and rigging and a few hours work she would be ready to sail to Hawaii and back.

The boats are out there.

More than you really need to know about the Albin Vega 27 but may be interested to learn can be found at:

The American Vega Association

solarwindsailor 09-20-2014 03:15 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
Alaska is amazing. I miss it. I use to live up there for about 2 years. I stayed in Anchorage, Kodiak and Juneau. Boy it never stops being cloudy. Juneau was the worst, but very beautiful.

I agree with you. I think the best boat deals are found by looking in person and not really any posting on the internet. Also the timing has to be right and how bad the seller wants to get rid of it. There are always great deals around just have to keep eyes open and be flexible.

I am glad to hear Vega sailed well.

Quote:

Originally Posted by vega1860 (Post 2208745)
Vigor's book is a good guide to boats in this class. Of course I am partial to the Vega but it is certainly not the only boat that would fit the bill. It may, however, be the best boat that fits the budget.

This summer I helped a friend connect with a seller here in Petersburg, Alaska. The boat was a Vega 27, asking price $3500 negotiable.

Three of us took her to Prince Rupert, BC and the new owner and I (His first boat) took her on her own bottom all the way to Port Townsend, WA, covering over 700nm. No problems with the boat.

You won't be seeing her, or boats like her, on the cover of Cruising World or SAIL magazine, but with new sails and rigging and a few hours work she would be ready to sail to Hawaii and back.

The boats are out there.

More than you really need to know about the Albin Vega 27 but may be interested to learn can be found at:

The American Vega Association


newhaul 09-20-2014 06:56 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 

fireman456 11-20-2014 02:18 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
An Albin Vega 27' has a wonderful reputation and one just finished circumnavigation of the Americas out of Anapolis

outbound 11-20-2014 02:35 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
4 Attachment(s)
If you were willing to go one foot up my vote would be for a Bristol Channel Cutter or a Shannon 28. Both have made multiple notable voyages. Even old ones tend to be in very good condition as they are usually well loved by their owners.
I think the BCC is one of the most beautiful boats ever made but be aware of the massive amount of exterior wood for such a small boat.

smackdaddy 11-20-2014 02:39 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
78 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by jdham137 (Post 719954)
Also, my budget is just under $10,000 so I'll of course be looking at used and older.

I know this is a very old thread and post, but if that's really your budget you should NOT go offshore in a small boat of any brand - especially a very old one. Period.

But to Out's point, here's a B27 for $13K that looks to be in good condition by the photos:

http://www.sailboatlistings.com/sail...45411/main.jpg

http://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/45411

But it's 40 years old. So is it really ready for "bluewater" or are you going to be putting another few thousand into it?

christian.hess 11-20-2014 02:52 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
I love b27 they are quite nicely made...and I dont know if smack is joking but I have a few sub 30 boats in mind that I wouldnt doubt taking offshore...and safely too...

cheers

smackdaddy 11-20-2014 02:56 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
78 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by christian.hess (Post 2381193)
I love b27 they are quite nicely made...and I dont know if smack is joking but I have a few sub 30 boats in mind that I wouldnt doubt taking offshore...and safely too...

cheers

I'm not talking about brand, I'm talking about budget.

tomperanteau 11-20-2014 03:04 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
Don't tell vega1860. He and his wife have been sailing offshore in a small, old, boat for years now.

smackdaddy 11-20-2014 03:09 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
78 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by tomperanteau (Post 2381241)
Don't tell vega1860. He and his wife have been sailing offshore in a small, old, boat for years now.

Did he go offshore in it for less than $10K?

christian.hess 11-20-2014 03:10 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by smackdaddy (Post 2381225)
I'm not talking about brand, I'm talking about budget.

gotcha...really depends where your market is...I know of plenty sub 30 footers that go for much less than 10k and go out to cruise...

california is one of those places:):)

read latitude 38 updates btw...plenty of folks doing and buying boats with much less than 10k

just look at these guys recently(34ft)
http://www.latitude38.com/changes/Ch...l#.VG5LTfnF-Qs

you have to be diligent in your searches and never give up...

THATS IT

smackdaddy 11-20-2014 03:15 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
78 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by christian.hess (Post 2381265)
gotcha...really depends where your market is...I know of plenty sub 30 footers that go for much less than 10k and go out to cruise...

california is one of those places:):)

read latitude 38 updates btw...plenty of folks doing and buying boats with much less than 10k

you have to be diligent in your searches and never give up...

THATS IT

Again, buying a small boat for less than $10K is easy. Tons of them out there. Buying and preparing a boat for offshore cruising for less than $10K is another animal entirely.

With your project, I would assume you'd get that.

smackdaddy 11-20-2014 03:16 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
78 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by christian.hess (Post 2381265)
just look at these guys recently(34ft)
Latitude 38 Changes in Latitudes September 2013

you have to be diligent in your searches and never give up...

THATS IT

Did you read this part?

Quote:

The boat turned out to be a surprisingly spacious Columbia 34 Mk II, which we got for just $2,000. The small outboard wasn't going to cut it as an auxiliary in the South Pacific, so I bought and installed a rebuilt Atomic 4. I know a gas engine isn't ideal for cruising, but it was what we could afford. Ichiban also needed sails, so I bought a used main and a used jib for $100 each. Naturally the boat needed lots of other work, which took up most of my time for the last year.

Our original plan was to start by cruising Mexico, but we weren't ready to leave in time for the season. So when we didn't leave San Diego until May 11, our destination became the Marquesas in the South Pacific rather than Mexico. After all the repairs and provisioning, our cruising kitty was down to just $400. But it was time to walk the walk, so we left.
That engine alone could have been $4K-$5K:

http://www.moyermarine.com/exchange.htm

Granted, I have no idea what the size of their kitty was - but they certainly didn't sail off for that $2K.

christian.hess 11-20-2014 03:19 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by smackdaddy (Post 2381273)
Again, buying a small boat for less than $10K is easy. Tons of them out there. Buying and preparing a boat for offshore cruising for less than $10K is another animal entirely.

With your project, I would assume you'd get that.

I do and thats why im offering another point of view smack not trying to argue

look at that link

people outfit and do things differently all the time

you cant write in stone that a boat under 10k cant be bought and outfitted without going over budget

I have done in the past and know many who have...sewaorthy and safely

due dilligence and patience pays off

christian.hess 11-20-2014 03:20 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by smackdaddy (Post 2381289)
Did you read this part?

yes I did smack I read latitde 38 every day since I started cruising back 15 years ago...

I have linked them i the past especially on the 500 thread

they are not unique and alone

others have done it even with free boats

just saying

smackdaddy 11-20-2014 03:24 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
78 Attachment(s)
Okay.

christian.hess 11-20-2014 03:31 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
smack I gotta say you dont treat others comments and thoughts with respect like yours command...

I was simply offering another point of view...you should learn more and be more accepting of others and how others do things...

cruising, outfitting and buying boats isnt black and white...

I can only assume you think your way is better...

and I mean this way in the nicest way possible...I actually agree with you on many things

as usual we are ALL entitled to your opinions and thoughts...

peace

smackdaddy 11-20-2014 03:45 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
78 Attachment(s)
I don't command respect for my comments. Anyone is welcome to agree or disagree with them. It's just a forum discussion.

And, absolutely, everyone is fully entitled to their opinion. But, being a newb just a few years ago talking about buying a boat to go cruising in and thinking about budgets, etc. - and having just been through the actual purchase and upgrade/outfit process myself...THERE IS NO WAY I would EVER recommend to a guy like myself a few years ago that doing all of this for "bluewater" for a sub-$10K budget - even for a sub-30' boat - is at all a good idea.

Is it possible? Sure. Anything is.

Is it practical for most people? Hell no.

That's all I'm saying. Take it or leave it.

Barquito 11-20-2014 05:36 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
My B27 only cost about $5k. I have probably put $2k more into it. I think a couple more k's and I would be willing to take it down the East coast. Jump over to the Bahamas, and take a leisurely thorny route to the islands. I don't think I would want to go via Burmuda in what is a just a tough coastal boat.

christian.hess 11-20-2014 05:52 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by smackdaddy (Post 2381465)
I don't command respect for my comments. Anyone is welcome to agree or disagree with them. It's just a forum discussion.

And, absolutely, everyone is fully entitled to their opinion. But, being a newb just a few years ago talking about buying a boat to go cruising in and thinking about budgets, etc. - and having just been through the actual purchase and upgrade/outfit process myself...THERE IS NO WAY I would EVER recommend to a guy like myself a few years ago that doing all of this for "bluewater" for a sub-$10K budget - even for a sub-30' boat - is at all a good idea.

Is it possible? Sure. Anything is.

Is it practical for most people? Hell no.


That's all I'm saying. Take it or leave it.

wise words...as its is partially true

however there are others that have done it, easily and happily, all it takes is a bit of elbow grease, effort and patience...

just as barquito has quite effortlessly expressed as opposed to me:)

like you say take it or leave it:)

Tenoch 11-20-2014 06:19 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
Webb Chiles claimed to have never spent more than $10,000 on a boat (can't remember where I read that)...but I'm sure that does not include fitting out and provisioning. Also Webb Chiles is a bad-ass.

christian.hess 11-20-2014 06:53 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
tenoch Im no chiles...

thats damn obvious...

but this was my budget for my h28:
2k for boat
4k refit(including autopilot and gear for trip), refinished masts, garboard strake.
my dad gave me $500 in cash and said go!!! I was 18

my crew took care of the stops, diesel and the occasional meal

that was the deal for that trip...

Marieholm folkboat was $5500 for boat...I had a spare rudder I made a half ass windvane...it came with dodger, great sails, merc 5hp on a mount
refit 1k(mostly interior work)
added gusher pump for cockpit, anchor, paint

that boat was going to be my transpac solo boat like the JESTER FOLKBOAT(I went to chef school instead oh well)

other recent example

islander 34
fully equipped for cruising bought for $7k
aries windvane, rebuilt atomic 4, needed cutlass bearing replaced,semi hard dodger, mast steps, huge ground tackle, sails, st2000 wheel pilot, heater, full working stove oven and wood stove, pressure water and water heater, small outboard on poop deck, huge water tanks.

added small solar panel

refit 1.5k including gps, new vhf and antenna, bottom job, cutlass bearing, engine spares.

all of those were ready to go except for maybe ais or a cheap ssb install which is of course optional all would be seaworthy, all WERE, and would be awesome cruisers now and were before give or take owners wants or needs

needs being the big if...

these are just 3 example of the boats I have had, now multiply my experience by the hundreds of other california sailors who do just this and then go state by state, then go to the carribean, then central america, then go to the south pacific then asia(thailand) and then tell me:

that you cant do it under 10k and sail

well you are blind...cause it happens

ALL THE TIME

dream people!!!! dream big and things will happen

argue and say no nothing happens...

peace

Waterrat 11-21-2014 06:07 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
Determine budget.
Know your risk tolerance
Know your comfort tolerance

It can be cheap if you sail a Wayfarer, or drascombe lugger and can tolerate the risk and discomfort. It is all relative. Many wouldn't cross an ocean in anything under 50' and some do it in open boats. There is always a way. I find the discomfort of spending the money hurts more then making due with what is at hand. Humans need very little to be more then content such as a little food, basic protection from elements, and most importantly water. Most of the rest of my discomfort is best over come by changing my frame of mind.

sailpower 11-21-2014 11:12 PM

Re: Possible 27' Bluewater Boats
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by smackdaddy (Post 2381273)
Again, buying a small boat for less than $10K is easy. Tons of them out there. Buying and preparing a boat for offshore cruising for less than $10K is another animal entirely.

With your project, I would assume you'd get that.

@SD

Hijack alert!

I was channel surfing last night and watched Falling Down which I hadn't seen in years.

Made me think of your Avatar.

Cheers.


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