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post #11 of 41 Old 02-16-2012
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Originally Posted by flyingwelshman View Post
Na na na na na na na na na na na na na na na na................................................ .............
hehehe.....I was going over some notes last night for my Evolution of Altruism lecture (vampire bats are, believe it or not, a classic example of this). So, bats were kinda on my mind.

The exam will be Tuesday. You won't need a Scantron, but please bring a pen and a large format blue book.
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post #12 of 41 Old 02-16-2012
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I thought the food consumption rate was something I saw on the Discover Channel, but us OLD guys are plagued with failing minds you know. Here's something, however, that I just dug up that puts the feeding rate in perspective.

We studied food intake of and estimated ingested energy in female and male Myotis daubentonii during the periods of pregnancy (period 1, 8 May–4 June) and of intense spermatogenetic activity (period 2, 24 July–22 August) over 8 years (1996–2003) in central Germany. We used radiotelemetry to determine the time spent foraging and marked animals with chemiluminescent light-sticks to determine prey attack rates. Body length, body mass, moisture content, and caloric content of chironomids, the main prey of Daubenton’s bats, were measured to estimate the nightly food intake and, in consequence, energy intake. Pregnant females spent significantly more time foraging than males during period 1 and females during the post-lactation period. In contrast, male foraged longer during the period of highest spermatogenetic activity than during late spring and also significantly longer than post-lactating females. Based on a mean number of 8.3 prey attacks per minute, the time spent foraging, and a capture success rate of either 50 or 92%, calculated intake values with a feeding rate of 7.6 insects per minute (=92% capture success) were more consistent with literature data for other insectivorous bats than that of values calculated on the basis of a capture success rate of 50%. In the high capture-success model, calculated insect intake of female bats was 8.0 g during pregnancy and 4.9 g per day during post-lactation, providing 5.0 and 3.0 kJ of ingested energy per gram body mass per day. Calculated intake of male bats was 3.6 g insects per day during late spring and 8.0 g during period of intensive spermatogenesis, providing 2.6 and 5.7 kJ of ingested energy per gram body mass.

Neat stuff!

Gary
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post #13 of 41 Old 02-16-2012
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periods of intense spermatogenetic activity
I think I had one of those from between the ages of 15 and 25.

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Visualize the vastness of the oceans; the infinity of the heavens; the fickleness of the wind; the artistry of the craft and the frailty of the sailor. The oneness that may be achieved through the harmony of these things may lead one to enlightenment. - Flying Welshman
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post #14 of 41 Old 02-16-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by travlineasy View Post
I thought the food consumption rate was something I saw on the Discover Channel, but us OLD guys are plagued with failing minds you know. Here's something, however, that I just dug up that puts the feeding rate in perspective.

We studied food intake of and estimated ingested energy in female and male Myotis daubentonii during the periods of pregnancy (period 1, 8 May–4 June) and of intense spermatogenetic activity (period 2, 24 July–22 August) over 8 years (1996–2003) in central Germany. We used radiotelemetry to determine the time spent foraging and marked animals with chemiluminescent light-sticks to determine prey attack rates. Body length, body mass, moisture content, and caloric content of chironomids, the main prey of Daubenton’s bats, were measured to estimate the nightly food intake and, in consequence, energy intake. Pregnant females spent significantly more time foraging than males during period 1 and females during the post-lactation period. In contrast, male foraged longer during the period of highest spermatogenetic activity than during late spring and also significantly longer than post-lactating females. Based on a mean number of 8.3 prey attacks per minute, the time spent foraging, and a capture success rate of either 50 or 92%, calculated intake values with a feeding rate of 7.6 insects per minute (=92% capture success) were more consistent with literature data for other insectivorous bats than that of values calculated on the basis of a capture success rate of 50%. In the high capture-success model, calculated insect intake of female bats was 8.0 g during pregnancy and 4.9 g per day during post-lactation, providing 5.0 and 3.0 kJ of ingested energy per gram body mass per day. Calculated intake of male bats was 3.6 g insects per day during late spring and 8.0 g during period of intensive spermatogenesis, providing 2.6 and 5.7 kJ of ingested energy per gram body mass.
Encarnação, J.A. and Dietz, M. 2006. Estimation of food intake and ingested energy in Daubenton’s bats (Myotis daubentonii) during pregnancy and spermatogenesis. Eur. J of Wildlife Res. 52(4): 221-227.

BTW: 5.7 kJ/gram/day works out to about 30% of body mass ingested per day (depending on the fat content of the insects).

Never forget them. Do something to prevent it from happening again.
Charlotte Bacon, Daniel Barden, Rachel Davino, Olivia Josephine Gay, Ana M. Marquez-Greene, Dylan Hockley, Dawn Hochsprung, Madeleine F. Hsu, Catherine V. Hubbard, Chase Kowalski, Jesse Lewis, James Mattioli , Grace McDonnell, Anne Marie Murphy, Emilie Parker, Jack Pinto, Noah Pozner, Caroline Previdi, Jessica Rekos, Avielle Richman, Lauren Rousseau, Mary Sherlach, Victoria Soto, Benjamin Wheeler, Allison N. Wyatt

Last edited by SlowButSteady; 02-16-2012 at 06:41 PM.
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post #15 of 41 Old 02-16-2012 Thread Starter
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Sorry not vampire bats here just the small brown ones,so Dracula stay home.

Oh Yeah ... welcome to the animal planet ... we are just visitors

cheers
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post #16 of 41 Old 02-16-2012
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You need to raise your main more often.
Goodonya for building a batbox. Many would simply use them for batting practice.

The downside of all this, is that you no longer have a full bat in mainsail.

Thanks folks, you've been great, I'll be here all week.
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post #17 of 41 Old 02-16-2012
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Careful with your cute little house guests. Between 1-2% of all bats are actively carrying rabies. Do NOT get bitten by one of these little guys, it'll mean that you have to get a rabies series of vaccinations which is >$10,000 and really (I mean really) painful.

Of course you could opt not to have the post-exposure vaccination but to date there has never been a single substantiated cased of survival from a rabies infection. It's one of the few 100% fatal diseases out there. So bite = around a 1% chance of death. Not odds I'd like.

Bats don't usually try and bite people and shouldn't be a cause for panic, but I guess what I'm trying to say is don't mess with them up close because if they get scared and bite you, it's not going to be good.

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post #18 of 41 Old 02-16-2012
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Quote:
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Bats don't usually try and bite people and shouldn't be a cause for panic, but I guess what I'm trying to say is don't mess with them up close because if they get scared and bite you, it's not going to be good. MedSailor
Good advice for pretty well ALL wildlife.

I, myself, personally intend to continue being outspoken and opinionated, intolerant of all fanatics, fools and ignoramuses, deeply suspicious of all those who have "found the answer" and on my bad days, downright rude.
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post #19 of 41 Old 02-16-2012
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Good advice for pretty well ALL wildlife.
Perhaps but the rabies prevalence in species other than bats is much MUCH lower. The CDC is so trigger happy about bats that they even recommend post-exposure vaccination for those who have been near a bat and can't be sure they bat didn't touch them. Apparently bats can bite and you don't even know it. See an excerpt below from a medical textbook I use daily at work.

Be safe,
MedSailor

Photo of how small a bat bite can be:


----------------Copyright 2012 UpToDate Online----------------
Bat exposures — The most common rabies virus variants identified in infected humans in the United States are bat-related; therefore, any bat exposure needs thorough evaluation. (See 'Animal rabies epidemiology' above.)

The risk for rabies resulting from an encounter with a bat is often difficult to assess because of the sometimes imperceptible bite inflicted by this mammal (picture 1). From 1990 to 2007, a total of 34 naturally acquired bat-associated human cases of rabies were reported. In 15 cases, physical contact was reported but no bite was documented, and in 11 cases no known bat encounter was reported at all [4]. However, it should be noted that by the time rabies is diagnosed, getting an accurate history is usually precluded.

The ACIP makes the following recommendations regarding bats:

Postexposure prophylaxis should be considered when direct contact between a human and a bat has occurred (see 'Animal rabies epidemiology' above).
Postexposure prophylaxis is not necessary if the person was aware of the bat at all times while in an enclosed space and is certain that there was no bite, scratch, or mucous membrane exposure.

If the bat is captured and can be tested for rabies, postexposure prophylaxis in persons without direct exposure can await the results of prompt testing. If uncertainty about the need for prophylaxis still exists, the local public health authority should be consulted.

The ACIP also recommends that postexposure prophylaxis should be considered for an individual who has been in a room with a bat and who may be unable to rule out any physical contact. Such individuals might include: 1) a sleeping person who awakens to find a bat in the room; 2) an unattended child; 3) a mentally disabled person; or 4) an intoxicated person.
------------------------------------------------

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post #20 of 41 Old 02-16-2012
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As promised, here's the photo to go with my earlier post/story:


Catalina 34

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