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Old 03-31-2016 Thread Starter
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I wasn't born a blow boater

Hi everyone my name is Aiden and I'd like to start off by saying I'm very excited to become a part of this forum and begin this next chapter of my life. I am a powerboater born and raised, up until I was 2 my parents had a 37 sea ray we spent every summer weekend on. They shortly realized how small a boat gets with 2 babies, so they sold it and I spent the next 8 years in a boatless family of boaters. Many many hours were spent with my dad, showing me pictures of this boat, and that, watching old VHS recordings of them. Teaching me this brand and that, the difference in motors, and drives. So of course the inevitable happened when we took a vacation up to lake erie and my god father who is a center console dealer through the keys to a new 24 regulat or to my dad. We went out, and I think he fell back in love with it, and I finally got to experience what he was talking about, so at 10 they bought a house and a 28 sea ray which I spent hundreds of hours on learning to operate. At 13 with the help of my dad of course, I bought my first boat, a small center console, which I eventually upgraded from unto a 21 pro line. Along the way, for reasons unknown to me, at one point I decided boldly that I needed to go buy a 1973 AMF Sunfish, so I did. Long story short, hands down, most fun boat I've ever had the pleasure of operating in my life, I took it out as much as I could, often leaving the center console at the dock. One day, my little sunfish met it's maker sadly when I took it out in 6 footers, I flipped it over when I was tacting back in toward the beach trying to make my way along the shoreline, and it was far shallower than I had anticipated because when I righted it, I looked up for a split second to see that mast bent at a 30 degree angle before the boat came crashing down the other direction. After many failed attempts at righting it, I ended up untying the mast so I could get it right side up to tow it back in, I nevery saw that mast again, it disappeared into the lake almost instantly. After getting towed, we idled around for about an hour in the cwnter consolse unsuccessfully searching for it. I decided it was time to sell her after that so that was the end of my sailing experience... anyway, a few weeks back I watched a movie I stumbled across online, an Anarchist Yacht Club production, Hold Fast. Truly an amazing movie, about a guy and 3 friends, who set out on a mission to sail the carribean, living on the boat, fishing it, all the good stuff, and to do it on a budget one that's questionablly less than the average person's in fact! I think it has since sparked something inside me. I have a whole new burning desire to try sailing, real sailing, and actually live on the boat. I'm 18 and preparing to graduate this year, I use to think I had some idea of what I wanted to do when I grow up but here I am (legally speaking) grown up and more clueless than ever, so id like to try to use their journey as a bit of a mold for my own, take a few momths, maybe a year or 2 and just put my life on hold, br young, and explore the world. of course I'm not so arrogant as to believe I can buy a boat and just go sail, I'm looking to take some classes, and get some experience in thw familiar waters of lake erie before I'd ever go out on the open ocean. I also think I may have a good place to get a project, see I'd like to look at my godfathers marina, he has a small boat yard with many old abandon sailboats that have simply sat on trailers forgotten about for years, I feel like he'd practically give one away to me. So for the next few months I'm going to be scouring this forum, asking more stupid questions than I can even fathom. And hopefully I can make it out onto the lake by mid June and start my sailing, I want to take atleast this whole summer for practice, and maybe start my journew next summer sometime. If there is anyone with any links to more threads of people doing something like this, or people who have done it I'd love to get in touch. I am very anxious to see where this all takes me, it's like a new body of water I've never been down before, and i get to make the chart as I go. Sorry that got long, but I just wanted to make my goal on this forum apparent and thorough to those who care enough to read. Thank you for reading, im very excited to learn from everyone here!
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Old 03-31-2016
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Re: I wasn't born a blow boater

First welcome to Sailnet...Secondly I still don't know what I want to be when I grow up...I have decided that growing up is overrated...follow your dreams and at the end you won't have a bucket list...
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Re: I wasn't born a blow boater

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First welcome to Sailnet...Secondly I still don't know what I want to be when I grow up...I have decided that growing up is overrated...follow your dreams and at the end you won't have a bucket list...
Best advice i heard in a long time.
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Old 03-31-2016
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Re: I wasn't born a blow boater

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..Secondly I still don't know what I want to be when I grow up....
I want to be rich and retired. I'm going accomplish one of those

Don't blow air up my rear, be useful and blow it at the sails!
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Old 04-01-2016
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That movie was a fun story and made me think of adventures I took as a young man hitchiking all over the US. I wish I had done it on a sailboat. The guy who produced that film has a website for people who salvage and rebuild derelict boats. It is:

Blueanarchy.org

That movie was filmed a number of years ago and things have gotten even a little harder for anarchist sailors. If you remember from the film, they couldn't find a boatyard that would install a mast for them because the boatyards all require that a boat have insurance and they didn't. So they had to break some guys davit on his motor yacht lifting their mast in place.

It's questionable whether their boat would have passed an insurance survey to be granted insurance. There are some marinas and boat yards that won't let boats in without insurance. That guy was a phenomenal sailor and sailed into small bays under sail with no motor.

Those young folks got their boat and outfitted it in Palm Beach Florida. They were lucky to have the previous owner willing to let them camp out in their backyard and work from his dock.

I read on one of these forums that there are upscale neighborhoods in that area where they have enacted derelict boat ordinances where they have limits on how long somebody can anchor in that area. Those young people in their boat are just the type of people they are trying to keep out with such policies. They want wealthy yachting folks not hippies in derelict boats.

One of the things he doesn't mention in that film is how many places they couldn't go because of their lack of a motor and insurance.

I would guess that it has gotten harder to go sailing in the minimalist fashion as they did. But I have not tried it and have not sailed to the places they went. I would say that you probably can't do it exactly the way they did and would need to be a little better funded and have a boat that is insurable.

I am working on my plan to do much the thing same only in the old retired guy fashion: meaning that I am better funded and will have insurance and a fully documented boat. They did not.

The story he tells and that film was definitely a fun adventure but I think they also got lucky a lot. That old Pearson he had has a bolted on keel and they mentioned problems with it leaking a lot and having to pump a lot. They also tell the story about how the chain plate for their forestay broke in a storm. They we're lucky their boat wasn't dismasted.

They also had minimal electronics. I believe they only had a VHF radio and compass but no AIS, GPS, radar or navigational plotter. He admits that they were off on their reckoning a number of times and realized later that they came close to rocks and shallows. They easily could have snapped their keel off and sank.

My old man/retiree version will include quite a bit more navigational and communication equipment. But then I am better funded at this point in my life than I was when I was in my twenties. He also doesn't mention in his film anything about encounters with customs officials in the countries they visited. I think they may have entered some of those places illegally. He did mention, at one point, that he walked illegally across the border into the Dominican Republic. But he doesn't talk about the places they probably sailed into illegally.

So it probably isn't feasible these days to do it quite as cheaply as those three young people did. But if you adjust your expectations and work to have better funding and save more money, you should be able to do a modified version.

I hope you keep us posted on your plan and how the execution goes. I've been reading the blogs of several cruising sailors who have blogged about everything from the search for the perfect boat, the purchase, refitting and repairs, and then finally setting out to sea. I find them to be some pretty interesting stories. That would be interesting to follow your story.
Good luck
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Re: I wasn't born a blow boater

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Originally Posted by midwesterner View Post
That movie was a fun story and made me think of adventures I took as a young man hitchiking all over the US. I wish I had done it on a sailboat. The guy who produced that film has a website for people who salvage and rebuild derelict boats. It is:

Blueanarchy.org

That movie was filmed a number of years ago and things have gotten even a little harder for anarchist sailors. If you remember from the film, they couldn't find a boatyard that would install a mast for them because the boatyards all require that a boat have insurance and they didn't. So they had to break some guys davit on his motor yacht lifting their mast in place.

It's questionable whether their boat would have passed an insurance survey to be granted insurance. There are some marinas and boat yards that won't let boats in without insurance. That guy was a phenomenal sailor and sailed into small bays under sail with no motor.

Those young folks got their boat and outfitted it in Palm Beach Florida. They were lucky to have the previous owner willing to let them camp out in their backyard and work from his dock.

I read on one of these forums that there are upscale neighborhoods in that area where they have enacted derelict boat ordinances where they have limits on how long somebody can anchor in that area. Those young people in their boat are just the type of people they are trying to keep out with such policies. They want wealthy yachting folks not hippies in derelict boats.

One of the things he doesn't mention in that film is how many places they couldn't go because of their lack of a motor and insurance.

I would guess that it has gotten harder to go sailing in the minimalist fashion as they did. But I have not tried it and have not sailed to the places they went. I would say that you probably can't do it exactly the way they did and would need to be a little better funded and have a boat that is insurable.

I am working on my plan to do much the thing same only in the old retired guy fashion: meaning that I am better funded and will have insurance and a fully documented boat. They did not.

The story he tells and that film was definitely a fun adventure but I think they also got lucky a lot. That old Pearson he had has a bolted on keel and they mentioned problems with it leaking a lot and having to pump a lot. They also tell the story about how the chain plate for their forestay broke in a storm. They we're lucky their boat wasn't dismasted.

They also had minimal electronics. I believe they only had a VHF radio and compass but no AIS, GPS, radar or navigational plotter. He admits that they were off on their reckoning a number of times and realized later that they came close to rocks and shallows. They easily could have snapped their keel off and sank.

My old man/retiree version will include quite a bit more navigational and communication equipment. But then I am better funded at this point in my life than I was when I was in my twenties. He also doesn't mention in his film anything about encounters with customs officials in the countries they visited. I think they may have entered some of those places illegally. He did mention, at one point, that he walked illegally across the border into the Dominican Republic. But he doesn't talk about the places they probably sailed into illegally.

So it probably isn't feasible these days to do it quite as cheaply as those three young people did. But if you adjust your expectations and work to have better funding and save more money, you should be able to do a modified version.

I hope you keep us posted on your plan and how the execution goes. I've been reading the blogs of several cruising sailors who have blogged about everything from the search for the perfect boat, the purchase, refitting and repairs, and then finally setting out to sea. I find them to be some pretty interesting stories. That would be interesting to follow your story.
Good luck
Thank you for the insight! The part that really gets me was their lack of ability to get into certain places without insurance, I hadn't even thought of that! Also I really don't think I could do it without gps! Radar would be ideal, but it'd be more like icing on the cake to me, I could go with or without. Also, I'm really banking on my godfather helping out with something like a mast raising! He has a full service marina, debatably the best one in the harbor. He's let me store my passed boats free, and he gives me a lot of latitude that's probably not too warranted but I do appreciate it very much. I'm going to go next weekend and take a look at his selection see what he has that's been long forgotten, they are all up on trailers or on stands, so id have a solid place to work as well because there are other boats people actually use stored 100 yards away. Also many of them still have rigging, not saying much if anything would be salvageable, but there are some things still there. What I'm wondering was in that movie their boat was a 30, is that enough boat for something like that? Or do you need a bit more? I know sail boats can take a hell of a lot more water than anything of comparable size with a motor. But I just remember when he said 30 it jolted me a bit, made me cringe almost.
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Old 04-01-2016
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Re: I wasn't born a blow boater

One thing worth learning is that the term "blow boat" is meant to be insulting, derived from "blow job", if I'm not mistaken. The sailors' equivalent for motor-boaters is comparatively benign: "stink boat(er)" or "stink pot(ter)", even though, unlike motor-boats, few if any sailboats are capable of actually swamping or breaking equipment on motor-boats they pass near to. You'd think sailors would come up with a more damning term, but even if they did, the motor-boaters are out of earshot by the time it could be put to use, and they don't look back to observe gestures.
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Last edited by willyd; 04-01-2016 at 10:17 AM.
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Re: I wasn't born a blow boater

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One thing worth learning is that the term "blow boat" is meant to be insulting, derived from "blow job", if I'm not mistaken. The sailors' equivalent for motor-boaters is comparatively benign: "stink boat(er)" or "stink pot(ter)".
That's funny, I was wondering what sailors called motor boaters, hey no offense was meant to anyone, that was kinda my point in saying it because it's the different environment I grew up with. I was aware sailors don't proudly call themselves a blow boater lol
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Re: I wasn't born a blow boater

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Originally Posted by willyd View Post
One thing worth learning is that the term "blow boat" is meant to be insulting, derived from "blow job", if I'm not mistaken. The sailors' equivalent for motor-boaters is comparatively benign: "stink boat(er)" or "stink pot(ter)", even though, unlike motor-boats, few if any sailboats are capable of actually swamping or breaking equipment on motor-boats they pass near to. You'd think sailors would come up with a more damning term, but even if they did, the motor-boaters are out of earshot by the time it could be put to use, and they don't look back to observe gestures.
Just as a point of getting even, I take every chance I can get to buzz past stink-potters who "drift," our lake. You see I call it drift because they don't bother to anchor (that would take effort, and would also keep them out of the way). They motor out into the middle of the lake... shut the engines off, and drift with the wind (you know if they even knew why they were drifting). This makes them a moveable hazard to navigation... of course MOSTLY if they drift too close to land, they fire up the stinker and motor back to the center of the lake again to get in everyones way again.

This is usually when I sneak up on them, while they are bathing in the sun, or drunk and passed out on a bench... you see sailboats don't make much noise under sail... and you know with 10 knots of wind or better I can bear down on them at 5+ knots, as silent as a wave. Can't tell you the number of spilled beers I created with a 10 foot away sail-by... OK, so a beer isn't much damage... but the ego destruction, is PRICELESS.

Nearly split a drifter pontoon in half (this time by accident) while racing. Tacked the big genoa and little beknownst to me, a drifter slid behind the big jenny, and I was coming down on them pretty fast (upwind leg of our race, and wind was tooling 15-18 knots)... so I wasn't just overpowered, I was SEVERELY overpowered... I swear there were new wet spots on the astro-turf that day! Love it when they fire up the motor and get MORE in the way when you are obviously at LEAST 10 feet in the clear Man I'm racing here.. you're a moving obstruction... don't make yourself MORE of a problem!

Anyway, we're glad to have a new sailor, especially if it means stealing them from the dark side. Young new sailor is a bonus, we need more of them. Welcome to the insanity.

Welcome here Aiden.

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Re: I wasn't born a blow boater

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Originally Posted by willyd View Post
One thing worth learning is that the term "blow boat" is meant to be insulting, derived from "blow job", if I'm not mistaken. The sailors' equivalent for motor-boaters is comparatively benign: "stink boat(er)" or "stink pot(ter)", even though, unlike motor-boats, few if any sailboats are capable of actually swamping or breaking equipment on motor-boats they pass near to. You'd think sailors would come up with a more damning term, but even if they did, the motor-boaters are out of earshot by the time it could be put to use, and they don't look back to observe gestures.
I do have to say, too many power boaters have a lack of respect for sailors, I always make a big arch around anyone sailing, to give as much room as possible , ive always had a level of respect for those who were willing to apply that much extra effort on the water.
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