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post #21 of 62 Old 08-29-2016 Thread Starter
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Re: It Doesn't Get Any Noob-er Than This

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Originally Posted by jwing View Post
IF you rent or buy a sailboat with an outboard motor, the easiest way to dock the the boat is to pull her in stern-first with the motor in reverse. Do everything very slowly. Account for wind and current. Coast the last few boatlengths using the motor just for steering. If you need braking force, reverse the motor aggressively.

If you are worried about what other sailors think of that maneuver:

1) Get over it or don't get into sailing;
2) Understand that other sailors will appreciate that you are coming in a controlled manner that is not threatening their boats.
Trust me, what other sailors think of either the elegance or hardcore-ness of anything I do is not going to register on the worry-o-meter. As far as I'm concerned, as long as I don't wreck anything or anybody, and don't ruin anybody else's day out on the water, how suave I look doing it is not something that I'm going to care about. Safety + Good Time + Learning = Only Thing That Matters.

Thanks for the docking suggestion! If the situation allows for it, I'll definitely keep that approach in mind. I've only ever seen people pull in bow-first, so I wouldn't have considered the backing-in approach.

Current Boat: TBD
Currently Crewing: 22' Pearson Ensign (Wednesday Night Fall Racing)
Sailing Area: Casco Bay, Maine, USA
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post #22 of 62 Old 08-29-2016
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Re: It Doesn't Get Any Noob-er Than This

Also: YOU might want to spend more than 6 hours sailing around on a boat, maybe even your wife does, too. However, I haven't met anybody who doesn't sail that enjoys sitting in a small boat for that long. For most people, there has to be a few other things to do than sit on a bench. At least swimming, laying down, eating, drinking. But even then, 6 hours is a long time. If you bring friends, stay close to the boat's home base and be mindful of their moods. Be ready to return them to their car in short notice. Then you can take the boat back out yourselves for the rest of the day and really practice what you learned in class. What lots of non-sailors prefer is a sundowner cruise, or a sail to some destination, get off the boat for activities at the destination, then return to the starting place on the boat.
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Re: It Doesn't Get Any Noob-er Than This

If you aren't calling the yacht clubs you are missing out on one of the best resources out there for new sailers. Sure there are some that are very expensive, exclusive, and elitist, but they never let me in so I don't know much about them. The other 95% of yacht clubs are welcoming, generally cheap, and prone to force you to drink bear while trying to convince you to take their boats out sailing.

I don't know any clubs in your area, but my club costs about $500/year, and with that membership I can use any of the club owned boats as much as I want, seven days a week, including takeing them out for weekends... Out current boat list...

3 sunfish
2 420's
5 Flying Scotts
S2 6.x
Easterly 30
18' Boston Whaler

And we are not unique. Many yacht clubs own boats specifically for their members to use. With rental rates either being free, or just enough to cover the cost of operation.

Greg
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post #24 of 62 Old 08-29-2016 Thread Starter
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Re: It Doesn't Get Any Noob-er Than This

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Originally Posted by jwing View Post
Also: YOU might want to spend more than 6 hours sailing around on a boat, maybe even your wife does, too. However, I haven't met anybody who doesn't sail that enjoys sitting in a small boat for that long. For most people, there has to be a few other things to do than sit on a bench. At least swimming, laying down, eating, drinking. But even then, 6 hours is a long time. If you bring friends, stay close to the boat's home base and be mindful of their moods. Be ready to return them to their car in short notice. Then you can take the boat back out yourselves for the rest of the day and really practice what you learned in class. What lots of non-sailors prefer is a sundowner cruise, or a sail to some destination, get off the boat for activities at the destination, then return to the starting place on the boat.
Yeah, I've already talked to them about what they think their tolerance is ("4-6 hours"), and am mentally multiplying that by about 67%. If we can arrange the rental at all, which is no guarantee, I think my wife and I will try to get out early in the morning to sail by ourselves, and then swing back by the docks to pick up our friends early in the afternoon before heading out for the rest of the day. I'll certainly keep "Pick a destination they want to go to to keep them entertained" on the list, as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stumble
If you aren't calling the yacht clubs you are missing out on one of the best resources out there for new sailers. Sure there are some that are very expensive, exclusive, and elitist, but they never let me in so I don't know much about them. The other 95% of yacht clubs are welcoming, generally cheap, and prone to force you to drink bear while trying to convince you to take their boats out sailing.

I don't know any clubs in your area, but my club costs about $500/year, and with that membership I can use any of the club owned boats as much as I want, seven days a week, including takeing them out for weekends... Out current boat list...

3 sunfish
2 420's
5 Flying Scotts
S2 6.x
Easterly 30
18' Boston Whaler

And we are not unique. Many yacht clubs own boats specifically for their members to use. With rental rates either being free, or just enough to cover the cost of operation.
I haven't called any yet, but there aren't many in our area (really only three* within anything close to reasonable distance), and looking over their websites it doesn't look like they had club boats, either. (One looked like it might, but only J/24s.) I assume that, if they had a club fleet, they'd mention it (the way that Southern Yacht Club does), and they don't. Wouldn't hurt to call 'em and make sure, of course, so depending on how a couple of things that just came up play out I may do that later this week.

Tangent: Medical problems suck. /Tangent

Even southern Maine just doesn't have the population (or year-round weather, I suppose) to support robust yachting clubs, it seems. But we'll see how the weekend goes and perhaps see what the slim pickings of yacht clubs have to say (even though they seem to have multi-year waiting lists).

* Portland Yacht Club, Centerboard Yacht Club, and Harraseeket Yacht Club

Current Boat: TBD
Currently Crewing: 22' Pearson Ensign (Wednesday Night Fall Racing)
Sailing Area: Casco Bay, Maine, USA
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post #25 of 62 Old 08-29-2016
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Re: It Doesn't Get Any Noob-er Than This

If the racing group you put your name in for crew leaves from one place, I'd think about showing up an hour or so before they leave the docks. Introduce your self and ask if anyone needs crew (or rail meat). If nothing else you can introduce yourself to some folks and let them know your available in the future.

My boat (a cs36t) is in Portland at the moment, I'll be there on the 5th or 6th of September but only for o few days (heading south). This is my first boat that I bought last year. Be happy to show you it and what I looked for (and what I missed) if the timing works out.

Jeff
Cruising on my CS36T
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post #26 of 62 Old 08-29-2016
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Re: It Doesn't Get Any Noob-er Than This

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Originally Posted by jwing View Post
IF you rent or buy a sailboat with an outboard motor, the easiest way to dock the the boat is to pull her in stern-first with the motor in reverse. Do everything very slowly. Account for wind and current. Coast the last few boatlengths using the motor just for steering. If you need braking force, reverse the motor aggressively.
I dunno about that. I'm sorry but my boat backs like garbage under outboard, so did my last 3 boats... that would be an S2 7.9, a Capri 25, a Capri 22, and a Capri 14.2. So I'd wager MOST outboard boats don't backup well or at least not better than they go forward. That's 3 boats with transom hung rudders and one with a rudder post.

An outboard boat DOES have one great advantage, the outboard usually SPINS! So hard turns including turning IN PLACE are possible (tiller hard over and outboard hard over too, and gun it). if you happen to also have an outboard with Fwd Neutral AND Reverse, you have pretty much the easiest boat to control on the water (lock the tilt in place).

Sorry didn't want to hijack, but I thought it was an important thing to observe.

Welcome noob.. and frankly we're all noobs in various stages of experience at it.
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post #27 of 62 Old 08-29-2016 Thread Starter
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Re: It Doesn't Get Any Noob-er Than This

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Originally Posted by reduc View Post
If the racing group you put your name in for crew leaves from one place, I'd think about showing up an hour or so before they leave the docks. Introduce your self and ask if anyone needs crew (or rail meat). If nothing else you can introduce yourself to some folks and let them know your available in the future.

My boat (a cs36t) is in Portland at the moment, I'll be there on the 5th or 6th of September but only for o few days (heading south). This is my first boat that I bought last year. Be happy to show you it and what I looked for (and what I missed) if the timing works out.
That would be awesome, Jeff. We'll definitely be around then (no Labor Day weekend trips away for us), so if you're willing to entertain a couple of super-ignorant newbies for a short while, we'd be thrilled. And if you decide you'd rather not put up with us, I'd completely understand that, too, so there's certainly no pressure.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SHNOOL View Post
Welcome noob.. and frankly we're all noobs in various stages of experience at it.
That's similar to what I told my wife years back when I was trying to get her to learn golf. She was frustrated by being so bad at it (and for those who haven't tried, golf is tough to learn). I told her, "Look, there isn't anybody in the world who's good at golf, there are just people who are professionally less bad at it than other people."

Current Boat: TBD
Currently Crewing: 22' Pearson Ensign (Wednesday Night Fall Racing)
Sailing Area: Casco Bay, Maine, USA
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post #28 of 62 Old 08-29-2016
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Re: It Doesn't Get Any Noob-er Than This

Just a little comment about what SHNOOL about outboards and backing into a slip.

I have only had the one boat with an outboard, the Macgregor M26 and I have to say it backed up fine. It was turning or steering the thing in reverse that was a problem. Swung that bow around like a sledge hammer! That particular boat, at least the one I had, was smooth as golden bow in,,,, a bloody hazard in reverse! lol

Not to say the many other models out there are not just fine.

My suggestion about docking is to take a little time out on the water, away from all obstructions, and do some backing and tight radius maneuvering in whatever you rent and every time you go out. See what the different boats handle like with short bursts in both reverse and forward. How far does the stern kick over on a flush of throttle etc. Try to do some steerage just using the motor at center, not using rudder or turning the motor at all. A couple fenders, a bit of cheap rope and a few milk jugs full of water and you can build yourself a quick obstacle course to practice in. And it is a lot of fun! A lot less stress nailing a fender out in the open than the bow of buddy's boat in the marina, or the dock, or the,,,,,,

Not to mention doing a few good old fashioned MOB drills!! They can be harder than you might think and lets face it, the real thing never happens when your ready for it!

Practice reefing in light winds is good too. Time yourself and see the improvement every time you do it. When the day comes that you need to reef fast (and it will) it will be just another natural part of sailing.

And yes, we are all noobs as you say SHNOOL and, the day I stop learning new things every time I go near a boat, is the day,,,, well you know.
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post #29 of 62 Old 08-30-2016
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Re: It Doesn't Get Any Noob-er Than This

I will say that the school that I teach for in Rhode Island spends a LOT of time in ASA 103 on bow-in docking; along a dock, along a short finger, in a slip, port side to, starboard side to. Students also learn how to back and do a standing turn in the bay, then in the harbor, and finally in a narrow fairway. When I teach 103, I have the students run aground in mud, and then learn how to get off.


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post #30 of 62 Old 08-30-2016
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Re: It Doesn't Get Any Noob-er Than This

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Originally Posted by Landwalker View Post
I've read John Vigor's Twenty Small Sailboats to Take You Anywhere
Welcome!

If you liked Vigor's book, I can't recommend The Seaworthy Offshore Sailboat written by him enough. That way you can look out for features that will allow you to venture further if you ever feel so inclined. And if you are looking to buy...look at TONS of boats, even if you're not sure they are a good fit. A lot can be learned by looking at a boat you don't think will work for you. Many a folk have bought a boat they thought they would never own (ask a cat owner....)

As for us, we went head-first noob and bought our first sailboat never even having sailed before and just taught ourselves as we went; no classes either. Year and a half later we're living aboard in the Sea of Cortez Mexico with our two kids. (99% of the people on this forum will recommend NOT taking this route)

So do whatever feels right, safe, and comfortable. And ask questions if you have them. Lots of knowledgeable people on here...even noobs know stuff

~Chris

All sailors are cruisers, but not all cruisers are sailors. A smooth sea never made a skilled sailor.

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