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post #11 of 50 Old 01-01-2017
Learning the HARD way...
 
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Re: Alright, I hope I don't get clobbered here

In your location I would check with this group; Halifax Sailing Association - Join


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post #12 of 50 Old 01-01-2017
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Re: Alright, I hope I don't get clobbered here

By all means, take some courses and/or do some crewing so you can start to learn what's entailed with using a boat. Most of all though, put in the time and effort to learn if it's what you really want to do, before you get too deep money-wise.

Then, the first thing you need to do is decide just what you want to do on a boat. Cross oceans, see foreign lands? Island hop the Caribbean? Snowbird up and down the East Coast? Those are just some of the possible choices. Before you can prepare, you have to have some idea of what you're preparing for, and what you'll need once you're ready. In thinking on this though, it has to be, what will I do, not what will I want to do. Once you have a good idea of what you'll actually do, then you can think about the best boat to use for it.

John
Ontario 32 - Aria

Free, is the heart, that lives not, in fear.
Full, is the spirit, that thinks not, of falling.
True, is the soul, that hesitates not, to give.
Alive, is the one, that believes, in love.
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post #13 of 50 Old 01-01-2017
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Re: Alright, I hope I don't get clobbered here

OK, well it looks like its up to me to give you the clobbering.

You are not young and agile anymore and boats at sea can batter the untrained body. I have never made a passage without ooozing blood. In the first few years it ooozing every day out.

The smaller the boat the more frisky it is. From running flat to on a 45 degree angle takes about 3 seconds and being tossed about and landing on something hard enough to break bones is easy.

The people who have responded thus far have all been sailing since much younger and probably have no idea what its like for someone new that's older. (I don't know either as I've been sailing since a kid).

However, the above doesn't mean you can't do it. You can get some training and see how you go. If you enjoy it it's probably because you can handle it. It will take more than a week or two it get comfortable so give it time.

So, my recommendation would be some basic sailing lessons on as bigger boat as you can. Then go hunt up someone to whisk you off on their boat.

If you'd really prefer a gentleman with boat to have a romantic connection and sail off into the sunset then be BOLD and get your name on every singles sailing site as you can. There's plenty of men who would delight in someone that wants to share their passion.


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People can say they want freedom, but offer them the keys to what chains them, a map to where they want to go,
And they'll turn it down for the cell they know

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post #14 of 50 Old 01-01-2017
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Re: Alright, I hope I don't get clobbered here

Sailing is frequently uncomfortable and somewhat physically challenging. If you think a two hours of bicycling at a moderate pace in a light rain is fun you'll likely enjoy sailing. If you'd prefer to socialize in the shade while eating potato chips you probably won't.
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post #15 of 50 Old 01-01-2017
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Re: Alright, I hope I don't get clobbered here

Never too old!! Bummer you don't live in Marin anymore or I'd take you out. I'm @ OCSC Sailing Club & just bought a boat. What I like about a sailing club is that they offer lessons if you want them, or you can just have access to a "crew list" that emails people when they want crew & usually put what level they'd prefer. When I charter, I usually put out a crew list saying any level - but I'd like one person to be @ least Basic Cruising (BC) so I can relax a little. You split the cost of a charter (usually $60-$100 per person, depending on the boat).

The only thing about the Keelboat (BK) lessons & going that route is you're starting out on J-24's, which are super fun but a lot of work! I was totally battered & bruised after my weeklong certification. You don't get to the bigger boats until Bareboat Cruising (BBC). Once I got my BBC, I haven't gone back to a J-24.

I've also raced, it made me a better sailor but I'm liking a more leisurely sail now. Like anything, it's practice. Otherwise, it's finding the wind & raising two sails. The hardest part of my day yesterday was docking @ night, & it was fine. If you can hop on & off a boat, you can crew!

Happy New Year & I love your goal!! I sailed as a kid, and then stopped for 25 years raising my kids. I got back into it when I turned 50.
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post #16 of 50 Old 01-01-2017
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Re: Alright, I hope I don't get clobbered here

Sorry to hear you have lost both your partner and your child. Life does go on. Though it may take a while.
Learning to sail is certainly very possible at 67. I would recommend a sailing course. to get started.
Moving to live aboard, not so sure. I would recommend the idea. Before you consider it, Get out on the water and do some sailing. Via course's and Charters. Charter a boat of a kind which interests you just to get a feel if its right for you. A smaller boat at a club may work out a better option and provide an opportunity to meet people with similar interests.

Learn to sail get familiar with some different boats and think about what you want to do when you know for yourself what is involved.
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post #17 of 50 Old 01-02-2017
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Re: Alright, I hope I don't get clobbered here

Do you have the resources to invest in a week long liveaboard cruising class? If so, I suggest giving that a shot. You learn how to fair weather sail and get some experience living aboard to see if it's for you. Your aptitude and physical condition are the only limiters. You just have to see.

I doubt you're going to cross oceans, but I don't hear you saying that's the goal. Living aboard, coastal cruising, making 20 miles hops in good weather windows is completely doable.

Also, excellent advice above that living aboard is 20% sailing and 80% fixing and maintaining. Are you handy? Comfortable figuring out how things work? If so, you'll get there. If you are the type that has trouble figuring out how to set up a TV and cable box, then forget it.

Lastly, unless you die unexpectedly, you will move back ashore eventually. Be sure you have a financial plan to be able to do so. As we all get older and older, more stuff hurts, it's hard to bend and pull and lift and climb and crouch. Sailing is physical. You're going to want a comfortable boat to liveaboard.... higher overheads, creature comforts, larger bunks and showers, etc.

Go take that week long course and see what you think.


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post #18 of 50 Old 01-02-2017
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Re: Alright, I hope I don't get clobbered here

It's never too late. You can sleep when you're dead.
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post #19 of 50 Old 01-02-2017 Thread Starter
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Re: Alright, I hope I don't get clobbered here

From all the comments here it sounds like the sailing clubs are going to be the most resourceful along with taking some courses. I am also checking into meet-up groups in my area. At present I am not looking to own my own boat but to be part of a crew on a boat. I am not a mechanic and would definitely need a man around for all those things, so it is best I become part of a crew or a captains wife. I have thought about all the body bashing one would take in rough seas and this could be uncomfortable but as one person said, Yoga is a good prep and I do Yoga. I so appreciate everyone's comments here. It has given me a very good start on this plan.
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post #20 of 50 Old 01-02-2017
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Re: Alright, I hope I don't get clobbered here

you can do that to which you set your mind to do.
if you can do stuff, then do it. if you are a 67 yr old quadriplegic, i would say--may be a lil far fetched, but with the right home health care it is still possible.
get a lil boat and sail it all over the place--as well as your home base. the more you sail your lil play boat the more confidence you will gain as you seek your home base boat.
have fun.
i am currently 68 and keep a formosa as home. if i can do it, anyone can.
life is to be enjoyed .


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