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post #1 of 10 Old 02-04-2019 Thread Starter
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Young Sun 35

Hello All

I own a Young Sun 35. It was built with teak laid decks on the coach roof and the side decks. The teak was worn out so I have removed it. The boat was built in 1981.

All the screw holes were drilled out, countersunk and filled flush with marine epoxy.
Intentions were to paint with non-slip deck paint as I could not afford to replace with real or artificial teak.

I suspected that there was some delamination so had the decks surveyed. Result was moisture readings off the scale and 99% delamination.

So moisture was entering the substrate possibly for many years prior to having the teak decks removed.

Two previous surveys failed to identify this and percussion tests did not reveal anything wrong.

Coach roof has 3-4mm GRP laminate with 40mm thickness of plywood substrate. Side decks also 3-4mm GRP laminate with 20mm plywood substrate.

Core samples indicate only one outer GRP laminate, then only plywood through to the interior.
I thought this odd as I was expecting two GRP laminates with plywood core sandwiched in between.

Removal of test pieces of deck GRP reveal plywood very wet and rotten in places. Also the plywood is in small pieces like a patchwork quilt.

Attempts to dry it out so that resin can be injected failed as this only achieved drying out the internal teak joinery so I stopped this before the joinery was damaged.

Does anyone know how the Young Sun 35 was constructed ?

How is the coach roof attached to the side decks and how are the side decks attached to the hull ?

I notice on the Tayana 37 that this is achieved by a longitudinal box section onto which the hull and decks are bonded.

The marine surveyor recommends replacing all the plywood substrate and relaminating the decks. Then painting with non-slip paint and then some treadmaster also.

The cost well in excess of the present value of the boat. Estimate around £45,000 to do this work.

The boat cost me £50,000. I have already spent in excess of £60,000 in repairs to date due to a catalogue of problems. Including £17,000 to restore the teak decks 3 years ago, which was not successful as the boatyard failed to realize that the teak was now too thin to be serviceable and should have been removed. The substrate moisture content would subsequently have also become apparent at that time. A missed opportunity.

If I can find out how the boat was constructed I would consider the complete replacement of the decks.

Can anyone offer any suggestions ?

Dave West Wales
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post #2 of 10 Old 02-04-2019
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Re: Young Sun 35

Ouch. Teak decks on boats of that vintage are almost sure to be a big problem. Can't believe a yard would have charged that much to restore the teak decks only 3 years ago when they would have clearly been compromised. Basically you are looking a complete recoring of the deck at this point. Not sure how the deck is attached to the hull has any significant impact on the recoring job.

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post #3 of 10 Old 02-04-2019 Thread Starter
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Re: Young Sun 35

Many thanks JimsCAL. It is a steep learning curve. I have found out that boats like mine, similar to the Bob Perry design and built in the 1980,s are now coming to the end of their lives. Not a comforting thought.
I have heard of owners of Hans Christian yachts not messing around with restoring teak decks and just removing them.
I thought that the structural integrity to allow for longitudinal and transverse stresses relied on a strong deck/hull bond. It looks like this is not the case.

I am in contact with a classic yacht repair specialist in the south of England who specializes in the restoration of wooden yachts who may be able to apply some techniques to my GRP one.

My gut feeling is to walk away from this project but it is a nice yacht and I think if I persevere I will win.

Many thanks for your reply. I was not expecting a response from NY !

Dave West Wales
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post #4 of 10 Old 02-04-2019
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Re: Young Sun 35

Sad story here. This may be water over the damn.... but any boat that has any signs of serious wear on decks or around chain plates or stanchion bases should have a very thorough survey of the moisture levels of the laminates... deck, coach roof and hull as applicable. If levels are high you need to consider a major rebuild and that may be too costly.

You might contact the boat's designer for suggestions about how to fix this mess.

pay attention... someone's life depends on it
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post #5 of 10 Old 02-04-2019
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Re: Young Sun 35

The YouTube channel Sail Life has a walk through of recoring a wet deck. It took him (self taught, DIY, perfectionist, etc) months of weekends.
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post #6 of 10 Old 02-04-2019 Thread Starter
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Re: Young Sun 35

Thanks SanderO
It is indeed water over the dam, or locking the stable door after the horse has bolted, and many other relevant cliché's I can think of.

My biggest concern before the deck issue was the condition of the chain plates. They are glassed into the hull and through bolted. The GRP has to be dug away to expose the nuts and then to add insult to injury, one of the bolts is hidden behind the external teak bulwark so you have to determine where it is by using a divider.

It cost £500 to pull out and examine each chain plate due to the labour charge. That's £3000 total, just to find out that they were ok. The bolts were suffering from metal fatigue though so these were replaced.

There is a story of a Young Sun 35 lost at sea because the chain plate for the bob stay pulled through the hull and let in water, then it sank.

The chain plates for the rigging should be external, so they can be easily checked !

The chain plate for the bob stay should not be below the waterline. How bizarre to put it there !

So, if anybody is reading this post considering purchasing an elderly Young Sun 35, don't go near it. No wonder Bob Perry wanted nothing to do with it.

If I go ahead and replace the decks, then I will also fit doubler chain plates for the rigging. Dig out the bolts for the bob stay and renew them, then glass them in again.

The only good thing I can say about the Young Sun 35 is that it is beautifully fitted out inside.

Dave West Wales
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post #7 of 10 Old 07-14-2019
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Re: Young Sun 35

Hi Dave,

What did you end up deciding? Is Mizar your boat which is up for sale on Yachtworld?
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post #8 of 10 Old 07-15-2019 Thread Starter
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Re: Young Sun 35

Hello sailorshinde.

The boat named "Mizar" in the Yachtworld website is not mine. My Young Sun 35 is named "Taku".


After having removed all the teak from the side decks and the coach roof I asked for a quotation from a company on the south coast of England which specialises in the restoration of classic wooden motor boats and yachts.


They also repair GRP yachts so they were able to give me a favourable quote. This is for complete removal and renewal of the side decks and partial renewal of the coach roof in the affected areas.


It will be the same method of construction as original, ie plywood substrate sandwiched between 2 GRP layers. Maybe some extra deck beams used for extra strength.

I will make sure that any deck fastenings such as cleats and stanchion bases are bolted through from underneath with no wood screws involved. This will reduce the chances of moisture penetrating into the substrate again.


No more teak decking ! The finish will be GRP with non-slip deck paint.

Regards





The boat is scheduled to be loaded onto a trailer and hauled by road down to the south coast in August.
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post #9 of 10 Old 07-15-2019
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Re: Young Sun 35

That is fantastic. I am looking at purchasing a Young Sun 35. I wanted views on how the bluewater capabilities of the boat are. The boat I am looking at has a teak coachroof and grp side decks.
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post #10 of 10 Old 07-15-2019 Thread Starter
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Re: Young Sun 35

Well, if you have read my whole thread and still want to purchase a Young Sun 35 then I suggest very strongly that you get a full survey first.
You are lucky that the teak decking was only applied to the coach roof and not the side decks.

The coach roof on mine was built very strongly, with plywood substrate 40mm thick sandwiched between GRP layers 3mm thick. It was the moisture ingress which was its downfall.

The side decks had a plywood substrate of 20mm thickness. It was the moisture ingress and the delamination which was their downfall.


All this nastiness was going on, quietly, un-noticed, under the teak decking.


The teak decking is only cosmetic anyway, it does not contribute structurally.


Check for delamination of the side decks. The surveyor should do a moisture reading and a percussion test.
Also get the chain plates inspected for crevice corrosion if they are hidden and laminated into the hull.


As part of the repairs I will be fitting the chain plates externally. I can keep an eye on them then, and more importantly, easier to access if a surveyor wants to inspect them.


Personally, I would never purchase another Young Sun 35. If I decided I wanted nothing else than a Bob Perry design ( which the Young Sun 35 isn't) then I would save up a bit more and go for the Hans Christian.


Having said that, the Young Sun is no doubt a true blue water cruising yacht. Very heavy and solid. A bit slow but comfortable. If I didn't like this type of yacht I would not have spent the time and money that I have over the last 4 years.

I like to think there is a light at the end of the tunnel.

Regards
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