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CatfishSoup 11-23-2008 10:46 PM

Lake Huron and The Marvelous North Channel
 
It's so sad that nobody has anything to say about Lake Huron! I'm Here to stick up for her. If you are in the Great Lakes, there is no better place to cruise than the North Channel, located in the northernmost corner of Lake Huron, starting essentially from the mouth of the St Marys river and eastward.

The North Channel is the stretch of water between Manitoulin Island (the largest freshwater island in the world) and Ontario, Canada. Apart from the Manitoulin, there are literally thousands of smaller to moderately sized island in the region, most of which offer a wealth of natural beauty.

Places of Interest

Tobermory, Ontario. At the tip of the Bruce Peninsula lays the small town of Tobermory, the self-proclaimed "Dive Capitol of The World" It is build around a short channel and its harbor is big enough to house large cruisers. Awesome town. All around it are very shallow wrecks of large wooden schooners and other various craft from long ago. Rent some snorkel equipment and take a look- highly recommended first stop.

http://i.pbase.com/o3/09/43509/1/353...3_P7154221.jpg
http://www.hickerphoto.com/data/medi...bour_18988.jpg

Baie Fine. Further west and north is Baie Fine, an 8 mile long natural bay lined with fiords with a small cove called "the pool" at the end that cruisers can pull into. Drop the stern anchor and tie off to a tree. Within a beautiful one mile hike you are arrive a topez lake, possibly one of the clearest and most beautiful places i have ever been. It exudes "clean". The dead lake is hundreds of feet deep, a few hundred yards across, freezing cold, and one of the most refreshing swims i have ever had. Uninhabited

http://www.willisville.ca/Baie%20Fin...2705%20(6).JPG

Kagawong. Kagawong is a small town on Manitoulin Island. Besides being a fun small town to visit, it has Bridal Veil Falls, a wonderful waterfall that lives up to its name as a veil.

http://www.manitoulinliving.com/phot...Veil-Falls.jpg

The Benjamin Islands are about halfway through the channel. They are a popular spot for cruisers and offer awesome places to tie up to trees and have a campfire on the rocky shoreline of these small islands. Uninhabited.
http://calvert.vg/northchannel/s-ben_wd.jpg
http://www.frisinger.net/island/day_...nds_harbor.jpg

Little Current. I believe it is the largest town on Manitoulin. at a point where a drawbridge connects Manitoulin to mainland Ontario, you must pass through. Its a fun little town that caters to cruisers and is a good place to stock up on provisions and go to the bar.

http://www.manitoulin-island.com/lit...mages/town.jpg

There are many, many more places to visit in the area. Remember that all throughout there is amazing hiking to be had. If you start in the east and head west you can have a welcomed return to civilization at the end of your trip by going to Mackinac island. These are some of the most awesome places i have ever been on a boat, or in my life even. When i went through the channel (both times) i was on a 65 foot steel schooner, and was therefore draft-limited in where i could go. With a small cruiser, the peace of mind would be much greater and the places you could go would expand greatly.

http://www.yachtsentinel.co.uk/North...rthchannel.gif

If anyone has any questions, has been to or plans on going to the North Channel, or just has any comments, feel free to post!

~Garett

geraldartman 11-23-2008 11:04 PM

I join you in the lack of stuff here. Five years ago I bought 2 acres on the channel in Bruce Mines for a measly $35K USD. 150x700 with deep water access right on my shore and a city marina that costs only $1400 a season for dockage and winter storage combined.

We purchased our first sailboat last year to try the cruise thing. Just an inexpensive Catalina 22. We camped on it for 8 days. Sailed from Bruce Mines to St. Josephs Milvern Bay to Horseshoe Island to Detour and back. We had a great time on our real first sail excursion. We liked everything but the boat being a little small for camping with no separate head.
We solved that by selling it and replacing it with a US 25. That hasn't been in the water for us yet because of a move. But a good move the Michigan's UP. I am now only 2 hours away from Bruce Mines and one hour from Superior or Michigan. Soon spring will be here and I'll be getting her ready for cruising.

CatfishSoup 11-23-2008 11:31 PM

I've been to Horseshoe Island...I loved the place. We anchored off in that little recess that isn't the main bay, but I took the tender for a row into the horseshoe alone and just laid back and drifted as the purple sunset clouds went by and some deer romped through the woods. The American side doesn't have as much to offer in terms of geographical interest, but Horseshoe island is a gem.

Best of luck to you with your new boat. I hope you get to see all the awesome stuff there is to see up there. You are fortunate for being so close to the Islands, I have at the very least a 20 hour sail to even get to Tobermory, since I live in Port Huron.

PS, Have you ever been to Batchawana Bay? The provincial park (i cant recall the name) up there is awesome, along with Agawa rock hieroglyphs.

geraldartman 11-24-2008 07:44 PM

Haven't been that far yet. I was really excited about Fort St. Joseph. I was thinking like Mackinaw. What a let down. There isn't a building standing or reconstructed. Of course, it is our fault, we burned it down in the was of 1812 after the sly Brits took Mackinaw. But our revenge was sweet. We destroyed St. Joe where they came from, then after they moved to Drummond, they tricked the survey group into placing that into US hands, so the Brits out again with nowhere to go.

If you check property values on Manitoulin you'll be surprised, but getting there is a long ride. Little Current is where the bridge is and from the Soo is it is a 90 mile drive to the south of the island to turn and drive back north perhaps 50 miles of 2 lane back.

Port Huron is nice though. Lots of Artman's there compliments of my uncle and his 9 children. My grandfather worked for Detroit Edison at the Marysville plant until retirement. He sailed on the lakes when young.

xort 11-25-2008 08:35 PM

c'mon, tell the rest of the story...the real facts.
the mosquitos are as big as barn swallows and bite like the dickens. when they are not out in the evening ruining a pleasant sunset, the black flies are around and they are even worse. they sting like bees.
if you can soak in neet for a few days you might be able to minimize the terror of huge swarms of biting flies. But don't go to shore on any of those hiking trails. there's an unending carpet of poison ivy that will get through your pants right to your skin. Of course under all that poison ivy lurk thousands upon thousands of Missasauga rattlers the size of baseball bats with a particularly deadly venom. So stay on your boat where your chances with the flies are much better. of course the black bears are known to be good swimmers.
as for the boating, the north channel was charted in about 1650. the rocky pinnacles are quite unforgiving. you can be sailing along in 50' of water and then come upon a nice pinnacle just 2 or 3 feet below the surface. plan on having a life raft because there are no towing services within a hundred miles. also bring your own medical kit as there isn't any way to contact coast guard if you break or cut something. don't worry about heat stroke as the temps rarely get over 65 degrees, usually more like 45 degrees. if you are comfortable with 45 degree temps, you'll love the swimming. the lightning storms are sure to impress, don't worry you'll get plenty of oportunity to witness these forces of nature.

Enjoy that long treck up the barren shores of Lake Huron to get to this wonder of the north woods!!

canadianseamonkey 11-25-2008 08:55 PM

Xort - you may want to get your facts straight before going on your next rant.

I've never seen a Missassauga rattler yet, they are further south in the Georgian Bay area. Black flies are in May. Mosquitos are bad in certain areas in certain times of the summer and they are usually done by 10pm. Hasn't ruined one of my nights yet. Yes, we have bears, deers and moose...they don't tend to swim up to boats. My charts read 1991, not 1650. Funny, the marina that I'm at has a towing service as the does one of the other local marinas. The Coast Guard is available on channel 16 and is just as quick to respond as anywhere else....as is our police service. Your summers are no warmer than ours.

So if our sailing grounds are so terrible (rated in the top 10 in the world) why do so many Americans make the treck up each summer?

CatfishSoup 11-25-2008 10:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by xort (Post 407740)
c'mon, tell the rest of the story...the real facts.
the mosquitos are as big as barn swallows and bite like the dickens. when they are not out in the evening ruining a pleasant sunset, the black flies are around and they are even worse. they sting like bees.
if you can soak in neet for a few days you might be able to minimize the terror of huge swarms of biting flies. But don't go to shore on any of those hiking trails. there's an unending carpet of poison ivy that will get through your pants right to your skin. Of course under all that poison ivy lurk thousands upon thousands of Missasauga rattlers the size of baseball bats with a particularly deadly venom. So stay on your boat where your chances with the flies are much better. of course the black bears are known to be good swimmers.
as for the boating, the north channel was charted in about 1650. the rocky pinnacles are quite unforgiving. you can be sailing along in 50' of water and then come upon a nice pinnacle just 2 or 3 feet below the surface. plan on having a life raft because there are no towing services within a hundred miles. also bring your own medical kit as there isn't any way to contact coast guard if you break or cut something. don't worry about heat stroke as the temps rarely get over 65 degrees, usually more like 45 degrees. if you are comfortable with 45 degree temps, you'll love the swimming. the lightning storms are sure to impress, don't worry you'll get plenty of oportunity to witness these forces of nature.

Enjoy that long treck up the barren shores of Lake Huron to get to this wonder of the north woods!!

First of all, most of the things you list here are common thing for a hiker to run into. Bears, snakes, moose, and poison ivy are a fact of life in northern nature settings, and all can be dealt with with a little prudence and pre-caution. I also have never seen a snake in the north channel. Poison Ivy and snake bites can generally be avoided by keeping an eye out and wearing boots with long pants...this is basic knowledge for anybody that has spent more than a day in real wilderness. Bears and Moose are a slim chance of danger that one has to live with, and can also be very interesting and enjoyable to watch.

Yes there are bugs...again, get over it. They dont come in the apocalyptic swarms that you describe and are just as bas as anywhere else in the woods in michigan or ontario.

Yes, there are many navigational obstacles in the north channel, and yes, there are some mistakes on the charts...this is why you need to be a competent navigator and go slow or use a lead line in questionable areas.

The coast guard does not have a near-by station, and yes it would take a long time to get a response from them, but while in the channel, a boat called a mayday that had run aground (not because of bad charts, but because of incompetence. The fact that they didnt call a pon pon instead of a mayday when nobody's life was at risk is a testament to this). Within 20 minutes, 3 power cruisers were on the scene, and within 35 minutes, our 65 foot schooner was on the scene, and within 50 minutes, the boat was off the rocks and on it merry way to get a diver to inspect the hull (which, by the way, was a service found on Manitoulin island in Kagawong).

Yes, the lightening storms are very impressive in the channel, and i had the honor of experiencing three of them, all of which had wind gusts over 30 knots and driving rain. If you call yourself a sailor and find these conditions exceptional or extreme, then i suggest you sell your boat and buy an RV; you are going to find yourself very surprised if real weather rolls in.

Furthermore, I have sailed from Port Huron to Tobermory multiple times and each time took less than 25 hours...thats one day sailing. If you really cant handle a one day transit to get to a wonderful cruising ground, then just stick with the featureless, power boat-ridden seaweed puddle they call lake st Claire and get a flatscreen TV installed in your boat. Or perhaps you should head down to south bass island and embrace the tourism. That isn't what cruising is about.

PS The swimming is very refreshing once you get past the shock.

flyingwelshman 11-27-2008 10:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by xort (Post 407740)
c'mon, tell the rest of the story...the real facts.
the mosquitos are as big as barn swallows and bite like the dickens. when they are not out in the evening ruining a pleasant sunset, the black flies are around and they are even worse. they sting like bees.
if you can soak in neet for a few days you might be able to minimize the terror of huge swarms of biting flies. But don't go to shore on any of those hiking trails. there's an unending carpet of poison ivy that will get through your pants right to your skin. Of course under all that poison ivy lurk thousands upon thousands of Missasauga rattlers the size of baseball bats with a particularly deadly venom. So stay on your boat where your chances with the flies are much better. of course the black bears are known to be good swimmers.
as for the boating, the north channel was charted in about 1650. the rocky pinnacles are quite unforgiving. you can be sailing along in 50' of water and then come upon a nice pinnacle just 2 or 3 feet below the surface. plan on having a life raft because there are no towing services within a hundred miles. also bring your own medical kit as there isn't any way to contact coast guard if you break or cut something. don't worry about heat stroke as the temps rarely get over 65 degrees, usually more like 45 degrees. if you are comfortable with 45 degree temps, you'll love the swimming. the lightning storms are sure to impress, don't worry you'll get plenty of oportunity to witness these forces of nature.

Enjoy that long treck up the barren shores of Lake Huron to get to this wonder of the north woods!!

I'm usually not the 'glass half full' kind of guy, but, I'm thinking I'd like to see more of this kind of negative post about this area.

I hope to get up there - maybe as soon as next summer - so the more people that think that the North Channel is a crappy place to sail, the more anchorages I'll have to myself.

xort 11-27-2008 11:20 AM

WOW!!

It was a joke. Sheeesh, get a grip people; it was a joke.

Next time I'll use big smiley faces so even Mr. Obvious can figure it out :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D

"Your next rant" ... Loved that, monkey

geraldartman 12-17-2008 10:41 PM

Well if you want to get bit by a Missasauga, you have to run around naked. They never git like baseball bats unless you consider those "free" bats you got at the Blue Jays games real bats. Their fangs ain't large enough to penetrate clothing. Now if you are of the admiral gender and do this, please post where you will be ;-) I remember that carpet of ivy camping on South Manitou in Lake Michigan. I think it was the dominant species. But the views of Sleeping Bear at night were worth it.

modul8 12-20-2008 09:24 AM

There are a number of communities on the Canadian side of the lake. Sarnia, Grand Bend, Bayfield, Goderich, Kincardine all worth a visit on your way to Tobermory.
In my 36 years in Ontario I have yet to see a rattler outside the zoo.

LaPlayaGlass 12-30-2008 04:05 PM

Ports guide is a great resource for anyone heading up there. Some of those aerial photos are awesome for getting into some anchorages.
Al

xort 12-30-2008 07:29 PM

LaPlaya
Welcome to the asylum! Enjoy your stay. Winter is long, dark and cold. Hurry spring!

scottbr 12-30-2008 10:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by modul8 (Post 420477)
In my 36 years in Ontario I have yet to see a rattler outside the zoo.


Actually, my kids have seen several on Beauoliel Island, ( Honey Harbour /Midland area) at the YMCA camp they go to, and the snakes were not captive.



xort..... you've got it right, we went to the North Channel last summer and would not reccomend anyone else to go there..... stay away !!!! :p :p

CS271409 12-31-2008 03:56 PM

Scottbr and Xort,
Loved your posts. :cool: The North Channel is a miserable place and should be avoided by all. The friendliness is intrusive, the scenery is repetitious and the quiet is annoying. Fortunately, it is miles from anywhere and is hard to get to. ;)

Dave

xort 12-31-2008 05:04 PM

You 2 are such nattering nabobs of negativism! Stop the madness!

scottbr 01-01-2009 01:06 PM

Yep, typical afternoon on Georgian Bay


http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j1.../summer107.jpg

CS271409 01-01-2009 01:53 PM

Looks like a great day scottbr. Here is about as nice a day as you will get at one of my favourite anchorages in the North Channel. The little sprinkles of rain can sometime deter the timid. :D

[<a href="http://s278.photobucket.com/albums/kk97/CS271409/?action=view&current=TheStormJuly172006.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i278.photobucket.com/albums/kk97/CS271409/TheStormJuly172006.jpg" border="0" alt="Photobucket"></a>

xort 01-01-2009 04:57 PM

Were those pictures taken during the 2 weeks of summer up there?

canadianseamonkey 01-01-2009 06:08 PM

That's not rain....it's a swarm of mosquitoes.:D

scottbr 01-02-2009 09:52 AM

Mine was taken Aug. 1.... that's a winter snow squall rolling in.

CS271409 01-02-2009 05:43 PM

My picture was taken July 17 2006 just before sundown (which happens at about 4:00pm) You can see the freezing rain driving into into the slushy water that freezes every night. There is a great benefit here... choose your place wisely and the prudent cruiser is frozen into place overnight so there are no issues with anchor holding. And you can walk to shore to gather berries or perhaps snare a squirrel or two for supper. When the feeble sun peeks above the horizon at about 10:00 am, there is usually enough warmth to thaw the anchorage freeing us from the ice and allowing us a few hours to find another idyllic spot for the next night.:D

xort 01-02-2009 06:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by scottbr (Post 426172)
Mine was taken Aug. 1.... that's a winter snow squall rolling in.

What a pack of rubbish, August is summer. That's a summer snow squall. Very common year round up in the great white north.

xort 01-02-2009 06:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CS271409 (Post 426400)
My picture was taken July 17 2006 just before sundown (which happens at about 4:00pm) You can see the freezing rain driving into into the slushy water that freezes every night. There is a great benefit here... choose your place wisely and the prudent cruiser is frozen into place overnight so there are no issues with anchor holding. And you can walk to shore to gather berries or perhaps snare a squirrel or two for supper. When the feeble sun peeks above the horizon at about 10:00 am, there is usually enough warmth to thaw the anchorage freeing us from the ice and allowing us a few hours to find another idyllic spot for the next night.:D

the problem with that is the bears can easily walk out to visit you. especially if they see you are picking their berries.

Anchoring is almost impossible due to the huge slabs of granite that form the bottom. The only time your anchor will hold is if you get lucky by catching a fluke in a crevice. Then it becomes wedged and you can't get it out.

scottbr 01-03-2009 07:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by xort (Post 426415)
What a pack of rubbish, August is summer. That's a summer snow squall. Very common year round up in the great white north.


I knew that, just trying to relate to the southerly neighbours that don't understand snow eh.


I actually had ice on our boat last summer. We were cruising through Collins Inlet when that "little voice in my head" said drop the anchor after watching a t-storm build all afternoon, ( although not the clouds like the picture above) No sooner had we dropped the anchor than we were run over by horizontal rain, 52 knot gusts and hail that actually accumulated on the deck. Afterwords there were several trees downed just behind us. If we had continued on East, there is no way we would have made the turn to Beaverstone Bay and would have ended up grounding or worse at the East end of Collins Inlet. :eek:

scottbr 01-03-2009 07:16 PM

This was taken on the only day of summer in 2008.


http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j1.../summer176.jpg

CS271409 01-03-2009 11:22 PM

scottbr

Must have been the same day.

[IMG]<a href="http://s278.photobucket.com/albums/kk97/CS271409/?action=view&current=summer2008.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i278.photobucket.com/albums/kk97/CS271409/summer2008.jpg" border="0" alt="Photobucket"></a>[/IMG]

scottbr 01-13-2009 09:16 AM

The only sunrise last summer, the rest were covered with snow clouds.


http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j1.../summer168.jpg

scottbr 01-13-2009 09:18 AM

More boring scenery, rocks, trees, water.... it's all the same.



http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j1.../summer301.jpg

bljones 01-13-2009 10:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by scottbr (Post 424836)
Actually, my kids have seen several on Beauoliel Island, ( Honey Harbour /Midland area) at the YMCA camp they go to, and the snakes were not captive.



Wow, does that bring back memories. I spent three summers at Camp Queen E in the mid 70s. That was a fun camp, but a rough, tough location- a scattering of plywood cabins on one big rock. I don't know if they still do it today, but back then, the MNR rangers would snag a few of the braver or less imaginative campers to help survey rattlers. It was kinda cool.

scottbr 01-14-2009 02:25 PM

My kids have been at Kitchi for 6-8 yrs. Past summer my son was counsellor and is returning and my daughter will be doing L1. Good friend of mine went to Kitchi for years in the 70's, (one with the cottage by Mermaid Isl) and his kids have been there since there were 8, that's how my kids ended up there.

Usually the kids will spot the rattlers somewhere in the camp and they'll get the Rangers up to capture them. Don't know if they go on rattler searches anymore.

orient 02-16-2009 05:57 PM

Great thread! Planning on cruising for the month of July in the North Channel. Can't wait.

xort 02-16-2009 06:00 PM

Wish I could get a whole month to get up there to do that!!

orient 02-16-2009 06:32 PM

Its easy to have plenty of time to cruise when you're retired. Wife still working but has summers off. She also loves to sail. Life can't get any better.

modul8 02-16-2009 07:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by xort (Post 449142)
Wish I could get a whole month to get up there to do that!!

I second that.
We must work for the same boss...:D

patrickrea 02-17-2009 02:19 AM

Well, here is the real Southern Georgian Bay.
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3195/...2a81d223a4.jpg
This is what I eat when I am up there. 5 people, 5 different levels of doneness, 1 perfect meal.
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3051/...de0c652971.jpg
And one of the critters that goes with it. Massassuga Rattler that came off of Beausoleil Island. Roughly 3' long. A rattler this big hit my brother on the toe up near Parry Sound. Took almost 2 weeks for the swelling of his ENTIRE leg to come down.
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3306/...4caa153706.jpg
Some of our traffic. Anyone recognize their boat?
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3586/...1baa79f1a5.jpg
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3336/...6103ae66_b.jpg
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3607/...fbb3826f_b.jpg

scottbr 02-18-2009 02:06 PM

That area looks very familiar.

Next time I'm in the area I'm coming to your place for steaks. :D

patrickrea 02-18-2009 02:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by scottbr (Post 450473)
That area looks very familiar.

Next time I'm in the area I'm coming to your place for steaks. :D

Drop in! Just let me know when before you head in. I think I sent you the gps coordiates a while back. 6' minimum water at my dock, mud and weed bottom.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3437/...e57c2f86_o.jpg

scottbr 02-18-2009 02:56 PM

Yes you did. One of favorite evening sunset cruises while staying at our friends cottage, was just past Thompsons I. and then a slow loop thru FryingPan and then back to Mermaid.

What program is the chart from.

patrickrea 02-18-2009 03:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by scottbr (Post 450521)
Yes you did. One of favorite evening sunset cruises while staying at our friends cottage, was just past Thompsons I. and then a slow loop thru FryingPan and then back to Mermaid.

What program is the chart from.

Garmin's MapSource. BlueChart 9.5 charts. Something to note is the profusion of dashed lines on that chart. Submarine cables. They are everywhere in Honey Harbour. In our little bay, there is no signage. Our dock is 40' and was designed for smaller (20-25') powerboats so it's best to also drop a hook SW to take some load off the dock. For overnighting, transom to the end of the dock and drop a bow hook off to the SW. Sorry, no shore power! :( It's almost a 300' run to get power from the cottage. Too damn expensive these days as it would have to be 8ga wiring for the distance.

patrickrea 02-18-2009 03:19 PM

Sorry, I meant to add this image to give you an idea on the docking. That's one of our 14' runabouts at the dock. Usually the Bertram is tied up directly aft of it leaving the other side wide open.
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3530/...d77a4e0d_b.jpg

CS271409 02-18-2009 10:32 PM

Great pictures Patrick. I was surpirsed to see the picture of the big Beneteau "Beau Geste I" posted. We rafted with them last summer in Marianne Cove for a couple of days along with some other friends.

scottbr 02-18-2009 11:38 PM

Dave, when were you in Marianne's Cove. We were anchored a couple of nights across from Mariannes first week of August.

The island in Marianne's Cove is on the left side of the picture.


http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j1.../summer176.jpg

patrickrea 02-19-2009 02:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CS271409 (Post 450872)
Great pictures Patrick. I was surpirsed to see the picture of the big Beneteau "Beau Geste I" posted. We rafted with them last summer in Marianne Cove for a couple of days along with some other friends.

That's just some of our weekend traffic. The biggest I have seen go by, other than the CCGS SAMUEL RISLEY out of Parry Sound and the Miss Midland, was about 90'-100'. Gets a little crazy going past the Ardilaun Island beacon heading both north and south. I remember one Friday night about 15 years ago, my sister counted a boat every 10 seconds headed north bound into Cognashene and on up to Go Home Bay. And that's just the cottagers. It doesn't include the SeaRay and Carvers "cruising" from South Bay Marina up to Longuissa to drop the hook for 2 days of fishing and beer drinking. Nor does it include the 5 wide rafts inside Frying Pan bay.

CS271409 02-20-2009 11:17 PM

scottbr,
We were at Marianne Cove about July 20 (I'm away on business now and don't have my logbook with me with the exact date) I liked the looks of the anchorage on the other side of Baie Fine but the winds would have made it an uncomfortable night. I did some dinghy touring along the bay and found a few other nice hideaways that I would like to try. A dinghy depth sounding exercise in mandatory before going into any of the coves though.
By the first week of August, we were having a very pleasant few days anchored in Cove Island before we started our long trek back to Bayfield.

Patrick
There sure can be a lot of traffic in that area. My daughter was the sailing instructor at Delawana Inn several years ago. I can't imagine taking a CL14 out with a non-sailor into the channels around Delawana! The combination of tight channels, wonky winds with the islands so close and the boat traffic would scare a novice off sailing forever.

xort 02-20-2009 11:44 PM

Dave
You talking about the Cove island NW of Tobermory?

If so, can you share where? Good for a 42' boat with 5'6" draft?

patrickrea 02-21-2009 09:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CS271409 (Post 452424)
Patrick
There sure can be a lot of traffic in that area. My daughter was the sailing instructor at Delawana Inn several years ago. I can't imagine taking a CL14 out with a non-sailor into the channels around Delawana! The combination of tight channels, wonky winds with the islands so close and the boat traffic would scare a novice off sailing forever.

I can't believe they let people take out the kayaks and such into the channel between Royal Island and the Del. Same goes for the PicNic Island rental boats. The traffic is unbelievable through there on a Saturday. I'll have to get a picture of it for the other people around here. At least they moved the kayaks around the corner by the Boat Club.

Ahhh the Do You Wanna Inn. I (barely) remember some great parties there when I was 15-16. Having just turned 40, I can't believe the things we did. At the time, I learned most of my night navigation skills after 1/2 case of beer. Never did hit anything under the influence (except a sandbar in the Little Dog channel).

Gary M 02-21-2009 11:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by xort (Post 452439)
Dave
You talking about the Cove island NW of Tobermory?

If so, can you share where? Good for a 42' boat with 5'6" draft?

There is a big harbour in Cove Island however you need a little local knowledge to get in. I was in there on a dive boat out of Toby not my own boat but is is quite doable. It is on the south shore.

Gary

xort 02-21-2009 12:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gary M (Post 452605)
There is a big harbour in Cove Island however you need a little local knowledge to get in. I was in there on a dive boat out of Toby not my own boat but is is quite doable. It is on the south shore.

Gary

Looks like there are several, but I have the small scale US charts only so not enough detail to know.

CS271409 02-21-2009 08:48 PM

Xort,
Cove Island is a couple of miles north of Tobermory. Don't even think about going anywhere near Cove Island without Cdn Chart 2274 which shows the area including the numerous reefs in excellent detail. There are two anchorages but realistically only one for boats of any size. Don't go into "Boat Passage" which is the northernmost inlet. You can easily get into Cove Island Harbour which is at the south west side of the island. Approach from the south and watch your charts and GPS carefully. The water is very clear and the bottom (rocks!!) are easily seen on the bottom even in 25+ ft of water. After crossing a shoal area carrying at least 10ft if I recall correctly, you will find yourself in a pool 40+ feet deep partially protected from the west by Harbour Island. Line yourself up with the harbour entrance There is a narrow passage but it is easily navigable by favouring the north (port) side of the passage. This is clearly shown on chart 2274 and the shoal on the stbd side is visible in the clear water. We had good holding in about 8 - 10 ft and there is room for at least 6 boats although I have heard of far more in there. It gets shallow near "The Cut" at the SE end which is a narrow passage that has a bit of a reversing falls as the currents ebb and flows out to the big lake.
It is well protected but you can find yourself trapped if a long blow comes up from the west I wouldn't anchor there on a tight schedule.
Although Tobermory is relatively close, I wouldn't recommend dinghying in unless you have a large and robust dinghy or you could fiind yourself trapped in Tobermory or in trouble on the water. (My dinghy is only 8 ft with 3.5hp so judge for yourself!)
After anchoring in a quiet idyllic spot, you will be surprised to see a huge glass bottomed boat full of friendly tourists (Blue Heron V) come charging up the channel and circle the anchorage. That would be a good time to either be ultra cool :cool: and ignore them or wave and smile as they take pictures of your beautiful boat anchored in this great spot:D . If you see Blue Heron V anywhere in the area, feel free to hail the captain on ch 16 and he can give you a report on how many boats are anchored there before you head in.
Have a look at Google Maps and you will have a sense of the comments above. There is a single boat anchored in the middle of the harbour in the Satellite View of Google Maps (or Google Earth at approx 45deg 17' N, 81deg 43' W)
Enjoy!

xort 02-22-2009 09:36 AM

cs

excellent report, thanks

scottbr 02-22-2009 09:44 AM

Xort, Marianne Cove is in Baie Fine, NW of killarney.

Dave, we were there Aug. 2 -3. We're actually anchored in about 30 ft. of water. Dropped the anchor and backed into shore and tied off to a tree. We went right down into The Pool, being our first trip up there in our boat. We canoed Killarney years ago including one 2 week trip that took us over the portage past Topaz Lake that ends in The Pool. To us, The Pool was disappointing with all the weeds just below the surface. I had been scoping the coves as we headed in and returned to this one. I had checked the wind direction and the north side of the bay was protected.


http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j1...llarney559.jpg




The view from the south shore is much better, where you can see the rocky ridge, but it was too exposed to the NW wind. This year we'll check the south shore. This was our afternoon cocktail view, we headed over in the dinghy and let the dog run on the rocks while we enjoyed a beverage and snacks.


http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j1.../summer232.jpg

scottbr 02-22-2009 09:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by patrickrea (Post 452553)
I can't believe they let people take out the kayaks and such into the channel between Royal Island and the Del. Same goes for the PicNic Island rental boats. The traffic is unbelievable through there on a Saturday. I'll have to get a picture of it for the other people around here. At least they moved the kayaks around the corner by the Boat Club.

Ahhh the Do You Wanna Inn. I (barely) remember some great parties there when I was 15-16. Having just turned 40, I can't believe the things we did. At the time, I learned most of my night navigation skills after 1/2 case of beer. Never did hit anything under the influence (except a sandbar in the Little Dog channel).


I wouldn't want to take anything small in the channel in front of the Del. or even the beach area over by the Boat Club. The channel in front of the Del. is the busiest in Canada?

It's always amusing when a few kayaks would pull up to our friends cottage on the inside of Mermaid, looking for directions back to the Del.

namlak 06-02-2009 09:29 AM

North Channel route
 
We are planning a trip to the North Channel from the Midland area and wonder how people select routes to get there? Fast preferably.
Any hints?

scottbr 06-04-2009 09:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by namlak (Post 491615)
We are planning a trip to the North Channel from the Midland area and wonder how people select routes to get there? Fast preferably.
Any hints?

Where are you in Midland..... we're at Baymoorings

Fastest route is to go out past Giants Tomb and turn right...... only 90 nM from Giants to Killarney..... only 15 hours at 6 knots.


All depends on how fast your boat is and how long you want to sail / motor in a day. We left Penetang on a Thurs. am, motored ( no wind) to Killcoursie Bay ( Killbear Park) left at 7:00 am and motored in the channel up to Point Au Baril and headed across to Killarney, arriving in downtown Killarney at 9:00 pm after being chased around the bay by a late afternoon thunderstorm ( see my pic farther back in this thread). Wind was from the W NW at 10 - 15 knots so we made good speed ( 6.5 knots) and could head directly at Killarney.

http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j1...llarney478.jpg



Many others choose to stay closer to shore and take 2-3 days up the inside channel or sail out in the Bay and head in to the islands to anchor.

We spent 3 nights in Baie Fine and took more time coming back, stopping in Collins Inlet, Bustard Islands, Shawanagan, then home. Total trip was 9 nights out.

Other options would be to head across to the Bruce Peninsula and up from there.

Best advise is to get the Ports book and study it well, sure saved us a ton of time and guesswork. Also get the strip charts and larger charts to find the routes in and out of the islands and check for updates. They've added a couple of routes into the channel from the Bay.

Fanny 03-26-2015 07:00 PM

Re: Lake Huron and The Marvelous North Channel
 
Yes, the islands in the North Channel are awesome! But small with little campfile wood. What little there is needs to go into the ground for the next generation of trees and plants. If you want to have a fire, please bring your own clean firewood, not carrying asian longhorn beetle. Better still, skip the fire and enjoy the sunset and moonrise.

snokid 06-15-2018 10:42 PM

Re: Lake Huron and The Marvelous North Channel
 
first I know this is an old thread but it's the best one to ask my question in, unless I start a new thread...

We are going to be up to the north channel in a couple of weeks, for the life of me I can't find this simple information...

Coming from the Cheboygan area going through detour where do you check in to Canada?

I'm sure I can find the answer at my marina but I won't be there for a few days...

So coming from the west where do I check in?
thanks
Bob

Arcb 06-15-2018 11:30 PM

Re: Lake Huron and The Marvelous North Channel
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by snokid (Post 2051526554)
first I know this is an old thread but it's the best one to ask my question in, unless I start a new thread...

We are going to be up to the north channel in a couple of weeks, for the life of me I can't find this simple information...

Coming from the Cheboygan area going through detour where do you check in to Canada?

I'm sure I can find the answer at my marina but I won't be there for a few days...

So coming from the west where do I check in?
thanks
Bob

Thessalon could be a good option.

Here is an interactive map with checkin points.

https://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/do-rb/se...-sdtm-eng.html

snokid 06-16-2018 12:40 AM

Re: Lake Huron and The Marvelous North Channel
 
thank you Arcb!!

funny when you google checking into Canada in the north channel I didn't see that... Guess the kids have that on us older guy's!!!

thanks again
Bob


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