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-   -   beating in light winds (https://www.sailnet.com/forums/learning-sail/46699-beating-light-winds.html)

AllThumbs 09-02-2008 10:58 PM

beating in light winds
 
I am learning to sail on my own. I know that for beating, running the sails close hauled seem to allow for better pointing in general. A few days ago I was sailing in very light winds, and noticed I seemed to do a little better upwind when the main was sheeted out just a little (as in actually making a little headway, whereas making none when close hauled). The winds were 2 or 3 knots.

Is this right?

Eric

Stillraining 09-02-2008 11:17 PM

Relaxed sails (to a point ) power up more then tight ones

Faster 09-02-2008 11:42 PM

You do want to avoid over-sheeting in light air - it's easy to stall the sail. Raise the traveller and ease the mainsheet, allowing a bit more twist and a more open leech while keeping the boom near center. The mainsail leech telltales are key here. They should be streaming aft.

Ease the jib lead forward some to give a rounder, more powerful shape to the headsail and generally trim it a bit less than you might normally. While you may lose some pointing ability, at least, as you observed, you'll be moving better.

tenuki 09-03-2008 02:45 AM

depends on the boat, what are you sailing?

AllThumbs 09-03-2008 10:07 AM

15 footer. There is no traveler and fixed jib sheet blocks. I have control over the main sheet, outhaul, and jib sheets. Oh and I guess boom vang too.

Eric

farmboy 09-03-2008 12:55 PM

Don't forget halyard tension. In light wind, you want a little less than in stronger winds. Increasing halyard tension will help to flatten the sail in stronger winds. Tension the halyard with the sail luffing.

sailingdog 09-03-2008 03:01 PM

also easing the outhaul a bit helps.




merlin2375 09-03-2008 03:05 PM

Do you have a backstay as well that you can play with?

AllThumbs 09-04-2008 08:40 AM

No backstay. The mast has a forestay and two sidestays facing rearward slightly. I do have a boom topping lift (which, on another topic, interferes with the mainsail shape as the sail leach and battens "catch" on it with each tack. Sometimes passing past it, sometimes not).

Eric

sailingdog 09-04-2008 06:30 PM

If the topping lift is interfering with mainsail shape and catching the battens, you need to ease it more.
Quote:

Originally Posted by AllThumbs (Post 363050)
No backstay. The mast has a forestay and two sidestays facing rearward slightly. I do have a boom topping lift (which, on another topic, interferes with the mainsail shape as the sail leach and battens "catch" on it with each tack. Sometimes passing past it, sometimes not).

Eric





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