LiveAboard Pitfalls? - Page 3 - SailNet Community
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post #21 of 44 Old 05-14-2008 Thread Starter
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Deryk, where in NJ are you located? I grew up in Union and still own a family house in Forked River. I still love Barnegat Bay and Old Barney, my fav spot in NJ.
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post #22 of 44 Old 05-14-2008
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We have just moved aboard again after being off the boat for the winter. I remounted the interior windows on our cal 29 with lexan and my girlfriend used a headliner/fleecey type material over the bare glass, that's helped loads with the horrible condensation on the rainy old west coast here.

i got some great advice from this forum last month about do-it-yourself bimini and dodger kits from sailrite (not really well known up here on the left coast in canada) and i have to say their sewing machine and kits are absoulutely awesome! i haven't made the dodger yet but the machine paid for itself just on the bimini.

we even got a great rescue dog on board, a 3/4's size golden retriever for about a week and are learning to live with her.

i have to warmly thank and give a lot of respect to everyone on the forum for helping us! the advice and goodwill has been solid and unmistakable! thanks everyone!

the cockpit enclosure is pretty key at the moment for hanging wet weather gear, keeping boots, dog bowls. i guess that's not such a big deal in fla, though.

anyway, thanks everyone. i'll get a picture up here when i finish the dodger, but we gotta get out and go sailling soon, the forecast looks like a beaut...

tom
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post #23 of 44 Old 05-17-2008
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I as well will be moving aboard in the next 3 months . Shouldn't be much of a change logistically . I've lived the last 3.5 years in an eleven & a half foot camper in remote locations . Closing on 60 I'm being driven towards boat living . I have almost no possessions nor do I want more , I've come to regard my citizenship as a membership in a club I have no recollection of joining with high dues & almost no benefits , the only company I seem to be able to tolorate is that of a dog , a child , or a naked woman ( if she's smart that is ) . I am enamoured with the notion I could go almost any where I want & with no real attachments & never having held my life all that precious , if my boat ends up being my casket , so be it . What I crave now at all costs is peace & tranquillity . Not much of that to be had ashore . Good luck on your live aboard plans . To me there are no negative aspects . It may be as close as you can get to resigning from a " polite society " that for the most part is polite in name only . Once again good luck to you .
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post #24 of 44 Old 05-17-2008
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Turf,

The best way to keep condensation from forming is to keep the air moving. Buy a decent-sized electric fan and keep it running all the time. BTY, I've found condensation to be more of a problem up north, where temperatures can change so dramatically. Even when my boat was all closed up and in storage, mold and mildew problems were minimal in FL and the Bahamas.

I survived several years living aboard in South Florida and the Bahamas with just a fan and no ac. As long as the air is moving, you can tolerate the heat. A blowing fan also keeps the bugs at bay, especially at night when you're trying to sleep.

During the cold months in FL, a small electric heater with a fan will keep your boat toasty on even the coldest nights.

I applaud your goal to live aboard in FL. Other than an occasional hurricane, the west coast is a great place to live. Your next step will be to find a marina you like that allows liveaboards. These places are becoming more and more difficult to find. Finding such a place may be the most time-consuming part of the entire exercise.

Good luck and don't forget to invest in a good bimini to keep the sun out of the cockpit. The FL sun is a killer!
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post #25 of 44 Old 05-20-2008 Thread Starter
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Thanks again all for the many great ideas and thoughts. You have given me confidence in what I had thought and planned.
I have been doing hours of research online for many months looking for marina's and areas to possibly dock the boat. I think I have found a few that look very interesting and allow liveaboards. I was very concerned that it might be impossible to find a place, but I think it will be possible to find. Just a matter of the cost mainly. You do seem to get what you pay for in the amenities. If anyone has any "secret" spots please let me know! hehe
But seriously thanks so much for all the great info.
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post #26 of 44 Old 05-23-2008
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Turfguy, My wife and I have lived aboard our various sailboats in Florida continuously since 1972. I agree with all the postings above, but would emphasize a couple of points. Most important, keep functional and ready to sail. We always made a point of not grwing to the dock. Without land storage, dock boxes or other attachments to shore you are always redy for a day sail or distant cruise. In addition, it's been our experience that the worst place to be in a hurricane is at the dock. I know that there are many valid reasons to stay at the dock, ..family, business, other property, but we have secured up some inland creek or hurricane hole several times and come back undamaged to a marina full of wrecks! As for the mildew and molds, most of those problems occur when you close the boat and leave it for a week or two. Living aboard keeps things fresh. We always hang mildew bags when we close the boat when taking a trip away from home. Small is good if you can adapt. We moved on a 30' boat in our early twenties, 'had a 33' when our children were 7 and 9; moved to a 41' through their teens. 'thought about going back smaller, as we are in our sixties now and our children are in houses, but not yet. 'take care and joy, Aythya crew
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post #27 of 44 Old 05-23-2008 Thread Starter
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I want to thank everyone that has chimed in on this topic. It has been very informative for me (and I hope others also) and it has reinforced my desire to go ahead and "just do it". The advice on the Hurricane tactics was really helpful and gave me things to think about. I would always keep my vessel ready to sail as that is the main reason I want to live on a boat, the ability to take it sailing. Now if I could only sell the dang house!!!
Thanks again,
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post #28 of 44 Old 05-26-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjango View Post
I as well will be moving aboard in the next 3 months . Shouldn't be much of a change logistically . I've lived the last 3.5 years in an eleven & a half foot camper in remote locations . Closing on 60 I'm being driven towards boat living . I have almost no possessions nor do I want more , I've come to regard my citizenship as a membership in a club I have no recollection of joining with high dues & almost no benefits , the only company I seem to be able to tolorate is that of a dog , a child , or a naked woman ( if she's smart that is ) . I am enamoured with the notion I could go almost any where I want & with no real attachments & never having held my life all that precious , if my boat ends up being my casket , so be it . What I crave now at all costs is peace & tranquillity . Not much of that to be had ashore . Good luck on your live aboard plans . To me there are no negative aspects . It may be as close as you can get to resigning from a " polite society " that for the most part is polite in name only . Once again good luck to you .
I feel the same way much of the time now.
I wonder how I will break away.
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post #29 of 44 Old 05-28-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainForce View Post
Most important, keep functional and ready to sail. We always made a point of not grwing to the dock. Without land storage, dock boxes or other attachments to shore you are always redy for a day sail or distant cruise.
Excellent point! You've articulated something nagging the back of my mind that I couldn't quite quantify. One big help is getting rid of the landline and doing all communications thru cellphone. Now if we could just ditch the land-based jobs that in turn require the traps of non-boat-friendly clothing, and cars!
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post #30 of 44 Old 06-07-2008
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Eryka, We have now ditched the jobs and not working is working for us! As of 2002 we own nothing that is not afloat with us. We've found that we are able to rent a car for an occasional trip tovisit family for a holiday, etc. It has been economical for us to keep "non-owners" liability insurance which is far less costly than the rates of the rental company. 'take care and joy, Aythya crew
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