For Crew: How to Handle Docklines - Page 3 - SailNet Community
 39Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #21 of 55 Old 12-21-2016
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 165
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 4
 
Re: For Crew: How to Handle Docklines

Quote:
Originally Posted by capta View Post
You might want to try using spring lines, especially if there's someone on the dock who will secure it. But if you can get her alongside, even for only a few seconds, and get a spring secured even without outside help, you won't ever have a problem docking against the wind or current. Your crew can even remain on the dock while you bring the boat alongside more permanently.
Once you have your aft running spring line on the dock (no other lines needed at this point), using the engine in forward with the helm turned slightly away from the dock, the boat will just suck up to the dock and sit there indefinitely while someone (even single handing) gets the rest of the lines ashore. The harder it blows (or the current is running) the more throttle it will take, but don't over throttle or try to rush things. It takes time.
You really need to be able to dock your boat without shoreside help under any conditions, not just ideal ones. That's part of becoming a confident and capable skipper.
We do use springs quite a bit to get the boat on and off the dock but when the breeze is up the bow will blow down once we back off the speed a bit. Roller furling is great but there is a lot of windage with it. We can put the boat on the dock ourselves, even in a big breeze but it's nice to have a hand on dock to secure a line.
gonecrusin is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #22 of 55 Old 12-21-2016
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 165
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 4
 
Re: For Crew: How to Handle Docklines

Quote:
Originally Posted by SVAuspicious View Post
I just have a picture in my head of a 6' tall guy 200# stepping from the boat to the dock in his size 12 4" heels. *grin* Admittedly I have a warped sense of humor but that picture is worth 10,000 words. Finding the heels and a guy who can maneuver in them is the trick. You'll have to find an old Rocky Horror fan.



Blown on can be tricky also. My very first delivery we ran into Manasaquan NJ with big weather on our heels. The wind was blowing 20-25 onto the fuel dock and across all the slips. I ended up doing a Med moor to the fuel dock (on an express cruiser!) which pretty well blew the dockhands minds. It worked and held us until the storm blew through and we could move to a slip.

At that point the owner's wife managed to shove a 30A shore power cord into a 50A outlet. *sigh* That was messy.
First time we came into our "new to us" dock the wind was in the mid 30's and pushing us against it. When we laid on the uprights we snapped every single one of them in two. They upgraded to 6"*6" uprights.
gonecrusin is offline  
post #23 of 55 Old 12-21-2016
Master Mariner
 
capta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: somewhere south of civilization
Posts: 7,237
Thanks: 138
Thanked 392 Times in 380 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
Re: For Crew: How to Handle Docklines

Quote:
Originally Posted by gonecrusin View Post
it's nice to have a hand on dock to secure a line.
Over the years I've found that help from strangers on a dock can be more of a problem than help.
Bowlines tied to a mid-dock cleat while entering a slip, knots that don't hold, lines dropped into the water, etc. We do it ourselves, and just say, "Thanks, but we've got it".
SVAuspicious likes this.

"Any idiot can make a boat go; it takes a sailor to stop one." Spike Africa aboard the schooner Wanderer in Sausalito, Ca. 1964.
ďBelieve me, my young friend, there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats.Ē ― Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

facebook.com/svskippingstone
capta is offline  
 
post #24 of 55 Old 12-21-2016
Senior Member
 
Arcb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 3,561
Thanks: 207
Thanked 187 Times in 183 Posts
Rep Power: 4
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonecrusin View Post
We do use springs quite a bit to get the boat on and off the dock but when the breeze is up the bow will blow down once we back off the speed a bit. Roller furling is great but there is a lot of windage with it. We can put the boat on the dock ourselves, even in a big breeze but it's nice to have a hand on dock to secure a line.
What do you have for fendering at your normal slip? Do you have a long bow sprit? I don't know how big of a boat we're talking about here but a truck or skidder tire with carpeting on it might make your life easier so you can drive right to the dock and pin her there while you get a line out.

I had the same issue with an 86' triple decker imitation stern paddle wheeler I drove for a couple of years. Technically she was twin screw, but the screws were so close together splits and walking were totally ineffective even in light winds, so you had to drive her just like a single screw. She was desperately under powered too (top speed about 5.5) and one engine was prone to stalling.

My strategy there was to keep all way on, come in really hot, I'd only cut the power, literally a few feet from the dock, hit the tractor tire pretty hard, which would absorb the impact, get a line on. The impact with the tractor tire on the port bow was enough to set up a powerful enough rotation that the stern needed a truck tire as well so it didn't slam too hard.

I totally get you though, having somebody on dock makes life a lot easier.

Last edited by Arcb; 12-21-2016 at 12:54 PM.
Arcb is offline  
post #25 of 55 Old 12-21-2016
美國佬
 
willyd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Maryland
Posts: 621
Thanks: 36
Thanked 16 Times in 15 Posts
Rep Power: 12
 
Re: For Crew: How to Handle Docklines

For a reasonable fee I'll let you film me docking my boat, which should provide enough material for several "DON'T DO THIS" videos. Shrouds caught on nails and crew members in the water will cost you extra, as will a demonstration of "The Joust", a move I've perfected that uses a boat pole to stop the boat quickly.
eherlihy and Minnesail like this.

1964 Whitby 25
Severna Park, Maryland
willyd is offline  
post #26 of 55 Old 12-21-2016
Catalina 400 MKII
 
Scotty C-M's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Santa Cruz, California
Posts: 806
Thanks: 8
Thanked 72 Times in 68 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
Re: For Crew: How to Handle Docklines

Willy, I'd pay to watch that movie!! Popcorn, please...
Scotty C-M is offline  
post #27 of 55 Old 12-21-2016
Master Mariner
 
capta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: somewhere south of civilization
Posts: 7,237
Thanks: 138
Thanked 392 Times in 380 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
Re: For Crew: How to Handle Docklines

Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcb View Post
a truck or skidder tire with carpeting on it might make your life easier so you can drive right to the dock and pin her there while you get a line out.
I had a similar solution to docking a 36' single screw charter fishing vessel in it's 30 foot slip in Alaska.
With an average of around 35 knots of wind every day, there was absolutely no way to single hand the boat into the slip several times a day. She was just too light and unmanageable in those winds at slow speeds.
The solution was to mount a truck tire for the bow and just drive her into it. I'd leave her in gear, hop out and take my permanent dock lines to their cleats.
Not very graceful, but effective.
Arcb likes this.

"Any idiot can make a boat go; it takes a sailor to stop one." Spike Africa aboard the schooner Wanderer in Sausalito, Ca. 1964.
ďBelieve me, my young friend, there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats.Ē ― Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

facebook.com/svskippingstone
capta is offline  
post #28 of 55 Old 12-21-2016
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 165
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 4
 
Re: For Crew: How to Handle Docklines

Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcb View Post
What do you have for fendering at your normal slip? Do you have a long bow sprit? I don't know how big of a boat we're talking about here but a truck or skidder tire with carpeting on it might make your life easier so you can drive right to the dock and pin her there while you get a line out.

I had the same issue with an 86' triple decker imitation stern paddle wheeler I drove for a couple of years. Technically she was twin screw, but the screws were so close together splits and walking were totally ineffective even in light winds, so you had to drive her just like a single screw. She was desperately under powered too (top speed about 5.5) and one engine was prone to stalling.

My strategy there was to keep all way on, come in really hot, I'd only cut the power, literally a few feet from the dock, hit the tractor tire pretty hard, which would absorb the impact, get a line on. The impact with the tractor tire on the port bow was enough to set up a powerful enough rotation that the stern needed a truck tire as well so it didn't slam too hard.

I totally get you though, having somebody on dock makes life a lot easier.
When we enter the marina we are perpendicular to the pier we tie to, it's a T end. On one side is a fairway we can run down, and we do this when the breeze will push us against the pier (we back into the breeze, rotate and let the breeze push us onto the pier). When the breeze is parallel to the pier I can get the butt upwind so it is easy to push the bow into the dock (bow thruster). When it's blowing us off the pier I can't do anything but get the back of the boat up to it and then winch it in. It's been our dock for 15 years and I've yet to figure a good way to come at the damn thing when the breeze is up and it's blowing us off. We crank it in with the anchor windlass after securing the stern, it's my "don't you look like a loser" move when the breeze is 30 knots out of the west. We don't have a "dock" to drive into and the boat is over 30 tons.
Scotty C-M and Arcb like this.

Last edited by gonecrusin; 12-21-2016 at 04:32 PM.
gonecrusin is offline  
post #29 of 55 Old 12-21-2016
Catalina 400 MKII
 
Scotty C-M's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Santa Cruz, California
Posts: 806
Thanks: 8
Thanked 72 Times in 68 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
Re: For Crew: How to Handle Docklines

Goncruisin. Sounds like a good plan. No loser there.
Scotty C-M is offline  
post #30 of 55 Old 12-22-2016
Senior Member
 
Arcb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 3,561
Thanks: 207
Thanked 187 Times in 183 Posts
Rep Power: 4
 
Re: For Crew: How to Handle Docklines

Quote:
Originally Posted by gonecrusin View Post
When we enter the marina we are perpendicular to the pier we tie to, it's a T end. On one side is a fairway we can run down, and we do this when the breeze will push us against the pier (we back into the breeze, rotate and let the breeze push us onto the pier). When the breeze is parallel to the pier I can get the butt upwind so it is easy to push the bow into the dock (bow thruster). When it's blowing us off the pier I can't do anything but get the back of the boat up to it and then winch it in. It's been our dock for 15 years and I've yet to figure a good way to come at the damn thing when the breeze is up and it's blowing us off. We crank it in with the anchor windlass after securing the stern, it's my "don't you look like a loser" move when the breeze is 30 knots out of the west. We don't have a "dock" to drive into and the boat is over 30 tons.
Your strategy backing in makes sense to me. It sounds safe, controlled and effective, it's worked for 15 years, I can't think of any reason you would change it, I was only offering since you asked how other people were docking with an offshore wind. I picked the triple decker example because she has lots of windage and illustrates the point well

The boat in my example was about 200 tons and didn't have a single power winch on board, not even a windlass. If I had used the anchors, I would have needed to call a tug to recover them. With no winches on board and no thruster, it was all classic text book boat and line handling we relied on.

Although both Captas example and my example both used tires and aggressive boat handling techniques, they were slightly different. He drove on to the dock in a perpendicular fashion and pinned her there. In my example, I docked normally, coming in at about 60*, landed on my port bow, right where the spring bollard was, the deck hand or the cruise manager (who coincidentally is now my wife) dropped the eye on and while the stern swung in and the bow bounced off, I drove ahead on the spring to lay her along side. This wasn't easy by any stretch of the imagination, but you know how tourists are, when they pay $40 for a 3 hour dinner dance, they really don't care what the wind is doing.

When you said big sailboat, I wasn't sure exactly what that meant. For a 30 ton sailboat, tires might be over kill. If you get one or two of those big orange or white ball fenders, they might allow you to come in a little more aggressively with confidence that you won't do any damage to anything

Last edited by Arcb; 12-22-2016 at 07:12 AM.
Arcb is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Squeaking and Creaking of Docklines and Fenders... MedSailor Gear & Maintenance 13 09-02-2011 10:32 AM
What do you do with docklines? Honda800 Seamanship & Navigation 18 07-15-2011 06:38 PM
Attach docklines to Pilings arknoah Learning to Sail 11 05-20-2011 09:56 PM
Casting off the docklines PBzeer General Discussion (sailing related) 17 11-16-2006 04:58 PM
what can she handle inmotion Cruising & Liveaboard Forum 6 11-30-2002 08:47 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome