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post #11 of 85 Old 07-23-2019
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Re: Heave To

I heave to a lot when short handed cruising as a way of eating lunch or using the head. I do essentially what eherlihy suggests. I have done it in everything from around 5 knots of wind up to around 25 knots of wind and in flat water or a short chop. My boat has comparatively short fin keel and spade rudder (see drawing below) and the only time that is hard to hove to is in vary light air. I will note that my boat typically makes more than a knot of leeway if there is much of a wind blowing.
Farr 38 Brochure_Page_12 by jeff_halp, on Flickr

I will also say that the hardest boats to hove to was my 1939 Stadel Cutter:
Indian out of water Big by jeff_halp, on Flickr

And my family's Pearson Vanguard:
Windrift 1963-64_001 by jeff_halp, on Flickr

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Last edited by Jeff_H; 07-23-2019 at 06:24 PM. Reason: Syntax Heave vs Hove
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post #12 of 85 Old 07-23-2019
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Re: Heave To

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Originally Posted by Jeff_H View Post

I will also say that the hardest boats to hove to was my 1939 Stadel Cutter:
...
And my family's Pearson Vanguard:
Windrift 1963-64_001 by jeff_halp, on Flickr
I'll bet that it would have been easier if you partially furled that big Jenny.

On my masthead rig I find that my Genoa can overpower the rudder (depending on the wind strength) and the boat may gybe. Reducing the foresail to ~100% makes the maneuver easier and more predictable. This was never an issue with the fractional rig on the Hunters or Colgates.


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post #13 of 85 Old 07-23-2019
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Re: Heave To

Ed curious if when you were teaching did you teach hoving to as a storm tactic?

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post #14 of 85 Old 07-23-2019
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Re: Heave To

That's heaving-to? Looks kind of like a poorly trimmed/luffing main. I always thought a backed jib was essential to heaving-to.
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post #15 of 85 Old 07-23-2019
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Re: Heave To

On my prior boat, an Oday 23, it was fairly easy to heave to, especially when I used a 100% jib. when I switched to a 135 a couple of years later, it became necessary to furl down the genny when there is any kind of breeze up in order to heave to.

On my "new" Catalina 28, I've yet to try to heave to, but this thread reminds me I have to get that down with this boat.
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post #16 of 85 Old 07-23-2019 Thread Starter
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Re: Heave To

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Originally Posted by caberg View Post
That's heaving-to? Looks kind of like a poorly trimmed/luffing main. I always thought a backed jib was essential to heaving-to.
Thanks for bringing up the misconception that you need a jib/sloop rig to heave to.

As far as I know, the idea is to create an equlibrium between driving forces (sails) and control surfaces (rudders, skegs, boards etc.), resulting in a boat that is a) self steering/self tending and b) presents something other than the most vulnerable part of the boat to breaking seas.

In my video the boat is self steering, self tending, presenting the starboard bow to the breaking waves, not making headway, not making stern way, just gently sliding to leeward. How is that not hove to?

My other boat is also cat rigged (Bay Hen) and heaves to in much the same way. Position of boards is critical in establishing equilibrium on some boats (both of mine).

People were heaving to long before sloop rigged keel boats came along by creating equilibrium by whatever means were at their disposal.
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post #17 of 85 Old 07-23-2019
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Re: Heave To

Arch is correct and this points to why some boats are hard to hove to and why itís a bad storm tactic. Hoving to is dependent upon the balance of the forces above the waterline against those below. When a boat heaves (goes up and down as it rides a wave) the forces below the waterline change. As the boat falls there maybe a sudden decrease in lateral force. Similarly if wave height is sufficient wind forces may vary significantly. Lastly all wind oscillates. The oscillation may vary enough that if the boat lags sufficiently behind the oscillation the jib may no longer be back winded or in a single sail boat the sail may start to draw or be in irons.
This all has little to do with balanced spade rudders but much to do with the entire design of both hull, all appendages, mast position and what sails are up. Even the Pardys required a sea anchor to keep Seraphin hoved to and had to adjust that. I would suggest in appropriate conditions itís difficult to keep any boat truly hoved to.
I stated my boat hoves to poorly. Actually thatís not true. Thatís just a short hand that when hoved to it is easily thrown off that balance and requires active input to remain in the hove to state. We can hove to in a very quiet sea and light air and remain hoved to without active rudder input. However in stronger winds the foils start to work as as lift is developed some forward motion occurs. We do leave a slick but it marches aft. On prior boats have used oil. In order to be really effective a true hove to state is required and only lateral movement permitted. We no longer carry oil nor the releasing containers for that reason.
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post #18 of 85 Old 07-23-2019
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Re: Heave To

It's a little hard to see exactly what is happening in this video, and we can't see the rudder. What it looks like to me is that you are still making headway under a partially luffing main. I guess it's just not anything like I've understood and experienced heaving-to to be, and sort of an odd example of heaving-to to use as a discussion starter about heaving-to.
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post #19 of 85 Old 07-23-2019
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Re: Heave To

To address Lee's question; In ASA 101 Heaving-To is mentioned on Page 76 of the book;
Quote:
heaving-to is a great way to take a break. In ocean storms it's an effective way to have the boat more or less fend for itself...
In ASA 103 it is on page 78 under the heading Sailing in Special Situations, and it is described as a way "to ride out heavy weather at sea." It really isn't given much more than a mention (on page 77) in ASA 104. Colgate's Basic Sailing does not mention heaving-to at all!

In practice I address heaving-to as a way to take a break (enjoy the view), have lunch, or effect a repair. Given the choice to be anchored or at a marina or hove-to during heavy weather, especially with new sailors, the marina or anchor win.
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post #20 of 85 Old 07-23-2019
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Re: Heave To

FWIW, in variable wind conditions, J/24s heave-to really poorly. If the wind strength increases, you can get enough forward drive to overcome the jib and tack yourself. It's fine for putting a reef in, but I wouldn't want to go below or be more than a few seconds away from the tiller.
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