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So you want to buy a Hurricane damaged boat

Remember all those pictures of boats piled up after the Hurricane Irma? Ever wonder what happens if you were to buy one and fix it up? Came across this Vlog. Chief engineer for a super yacht quits and buys a Hurricane damaged Catamaran. Got to admire his skill set and positive attitude in what he is dealing with.
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Re: So you want to buy a Hurricane damaged boat

I bought a hurricane damaged Island packet 35 in January, in Pensacola Florida. Took me four months of full time work in Florida and two in North Carolina to complete the repairs and upgrades. Quite a bit longer than I expected. It also cost me about 60% more than I estimated. Am I happy with that decision? Not exactly. I would have been better off buying a reasonably complete boat. But it is what it is and I am happy to finally have it behind me.
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Re: So you want to buy a Hurricane damaged boat

Oh man.

We spent a few weeks in Antigua last Nov/Dec purchasing our boat there. The marina it was in bought all of the salvaged hurricane damaged Leopard catamarans from the BVI's and brought them to Antigua to sell them off. The yard had 100's of these completely wrecked boats, and seemed to be selling them like hotcakes. There were lots of people in the yard trying to buy them.

These were not lightly damaged, and the best of them had been sold off before they were brought to Antigua.

We met and had dinner with one of the guys who bought one, and talked with several others who had bought them. None of them looked like they had two nickels to rub together, and all of them had the same starry-eyed dream: they bought these boats ranging in $30-40,000, and were utterly convinced that by putting in another $30-40,000, they would have a $500-600,000 boat.

Now, let's ignore the extensive hull damage for a moment and focus only on what actual physical parts were needed for these boats. None of them had any rigging whatsoever. Not even pieces. None had crossbeams between the hulls. None of them had working engines, or engines that could be rebuilt - they all needed new engines AND saildrives. Of course, none of them had any sails. All of them were sunk to the deck, and none had any working electrical systems or electronics. None of the electrical systems could be rehabbed - they all needed complete rewiring and repaneling.

All of the interior woodwork was salt waterlogged and black mold was inches thick throughout.

The hull damage was eye-popping. All of these were balsa cored boats, and all of them were soaked. These guys (they were all guys) had been there months before us, and were at various stages of hull repair, with various levels of quality. Since I was there surveying a boat, I had my moisture meter. Didn't really need it because simple percussion told the story - all of these hulls were significantly wet well beyond the areas that had been repaired. I took these readings privately, and didn't have the heart to tell anyone.

I think there are going to be 100's of broken dreams. Probably already happened by now.

I have done a lot of glasswork and boat repair, and have no qualms about doing large extensive glass/core projects - but there is no way I would ever take one of these boats for free.

Mark
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Re: So you want to buy a Hurricane damaged boat

How were all these boats brought to antigua...barges, craned freighters...
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Re: So you want to buy a Hurricane damaged boat

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How were all these boats brought to antigua...barges, craned freighters...
Yes, craned onto barges and brought over.

Mark

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Re: So you want to buy a Hurricane damaged boat

Must have been one heck of a circus.
Great for the businesses on island.
The gov probably accepted potential problems with lingering and failed projects
Interesting
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Re: So you want to buy a Hurricane damaged boat

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Originally Posted by colemj View Post
Oh man.

We spent a few weeks in Antigua last Nov/Dec purchasing our boat there. The marina it was in bought all of the salvaged hurricane damaged Leopard catamarans from the BVI's and brought them to Antigua to sell them off. The yard had 100's of these completely wrecked boats, and seemed to be selling them like hotcakes. There were lots of people in the yard trying to buy them.

These were not lightly damaged, and the best of them had been sold off before they were brought to Antigua.

We met and had dinner with one of the guys who bought one, and talked with several others who had bought them. None of them looked like they had two nickels to rub together, and all of them had the same starry-eyed dream: they bought these boats ranging in $30-40,000, and were utterly convinced that by putting in another $30-40,000, they would have a $500-600,000 boat.

Now, let's ignore the extensive hull damage for a moment and focus only on what actual physical parts were needed for these boats. None of them had any rigging whatsoever. Not even pieces. None had crossbeams between the hulls. None of them had working engines, or engines that could be rebuilt - they all needed new engines AND saildrives. Of course, none of them had any sails. All of them were sunk to the deck, and none had any working electrical systems or electronics. None of the electrical systems could be rehabbed - they all needed complete rewiring and repaneling.

All of the interior woodwork was salt waterlogged and black mold was inches thick throughout.

The hull damage was eye-popping. All of these were balsa cored boats, and all of them were soaked. These guys (they were all guys) had been there months before us, and were at various stages of hull repair, with various levels of quality. Since I was there surveying a boat, I had my moisture meter. Didn't really need it because simple percussion told the story - all of these hulls were significantly wet well beyond the areas that had been repaired. I took these readings privately, and didn't have the heart to tell anyone.

I think there are going to be 100's of broken dreams. Probably already happened by now.

I have done a lot of glasswork and boat repair, and have no qualms about doing large extensive glass/core projects - but there is no way I would ever take one of these boats for free.

Mark
Yeag some will soon find the dream gets run over by reality. These fellows spent $150,000 for the boat as is. Asking price was 220 thousand. Because it was one of the few boats that still had it's rigging standing. They already poured $20 thousand into it and the meter is still running.

Mike
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Re: So you want to buy a Hurricane damaged boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by colemj View Post
Oh man.

We spent a few weeks in Antigua last Nov/Dec purchasing our boat there. The marina it was in bought all of the salvaged hurricane damaged Leopard catamarans from the BVI's and brought them to Antigua to sell them off. The yard had 100's of these completely wrecked boats, and seemed to be selling them like hotcakes. There were lots of people in the yard trying to buy them.

These were not lightly damaged, and the best of them had been sold off before they were brought to Antigua.

We met and had dinner with one of the guys who bought one, and talked with several others who had bought them. None of them looked like they had two nickels to rub together, and all of them had the same starry-eyed dream: they bought these boats ranging in $30-40,000, and were utterly convinced that by putting in another $30-40,000, they would have a $500-600,000 boat.

Now, let's ignore the extensive hull damage for a moment and focus only on what actual physical parts were needed for these boats. None of them had any rigging whatsoever. Not even pieces. None had crossbeams between the hulls. None of them had working engines, or engines that could be rebuilt - they all needed new engines AND saildrives. Of course, none of them had any sails. All of them were sunk to the deck, and none had any working electrical systems or electronics. None of the electrical systems could be rehabbed - they all needed complete rewiring and repaneling.

All of the interior woodwork was salt waterlogged and black mold was inches thick throughout.

The hull damage was eye-popping. All of these were balsa cored boats, and all of them were soaked. These guys (they were all guys) had been there months before us, and were at various stages of hull repair, with various levels of quality. Since I was there surveying a boat, I had my moisture meter. Didn't really need it because simple percussion told the story - all of these hulls were significantly wet well beyond the areas that had been repaired. I took these readings privately, and didn't have the heart to tell anyone.

I think there are going to be 100's of broken dreams. Probably already happened by now.

I have done a lot of glasswork and boat repair, and have no qualms about doing large extensive glass/core projects - but there is no way I would ever take one of these boats for free.

Mark
Yeah some will soon find the dream gets run over by reality. These fellows spent $150,000 for the boat as is. Asking price was 220 thousand. Because it was one of the few boats that still had it's rigging standing. They already poured $20 thousand into it and the meter is still running.

Mike
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Re: So you want to buy a Hurricane damaged boat

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Yeah some will soon find the dream gets run over by reality. These fellows spent $150,000 for the boat as is. Asking price was 220 thousand. Because it was one of the few boats that still had it's rigging standing. They already poured $20 thousand into it and the meter is still running.
I watched the hull repair vids. Maybe I could have pulled that off 20 years ago, but I was thinking how impossible it would be now. It seemed they had several friends working for what they said was 5 weeks on replacing damaged hull core and glassing it in. Imagine the cost of labor and they havenít even started to replace gel oat or paint. 3 guys, 5 weeks, tens of thousands.

Seems they sailed her out of BVI, so they stand a chance. I didnít watch enough of their vids to understand the plan. Seemed like two partners wanting to sail the world on a fixed up boat. The hurricane damage may be the easiest of challenges they face.
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Re: So you want to buy a Hurricane damaged boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by colemj View Post
Oh man.
The marina it was in (in Antigua) bought all of the salvaged hurricane damaged Leopard catamarans from the BVI's and brought them to Antigua to sell them off. The yard had 100's of these completely wrecked boats, and seemed to be selling them like hotcakes. There were lots of people in the yard trying to buy them.

These were not lightly damaged, and the best of them had been sold off before they were brought to Antigua.

We met and had dinner with one of the guys who bought one, and talked with several others who had bought them. None of them looked like they had two nickels to rub together, and all of them had the same starry-eyed dream: they bought these boats ranging in $30-40,000, and were utterly convinced that by putting in another $30-40,000, they would have a $500-600,000 boat.

Now, let's ignore the extensive hull damage for a moment and focus only on what actual physical parts were needed for these boats. None of them had any rigging whatsoever. Not even pieces. None had crossbeams between the hulls. None of them had working engines, or engines that could be rebuilt - they all needed new engines AND saildrives. Of course, none of them had any sails. All of them were sunk to the deck, and none had any working electrical systems or electronics. None of the electrical systems could be rehabbed - they all needed complete rewiring and repaneling.

All of the interior woodwork was salt waterlogged and black mold was inches thick throughout.

The hull damage was eye-popping. All of these were balsa cored boats, and all of them were soaked. These guys (they were all guys) had been there months before us, and were at various stages of hull repair, with various levels of quality. Since I was there surveying a boat, I had my moisture meter. Didn't really need it because simple percussion told the story - all of these hulls were significantly wet well beyond the areas that had been repaired. I took these readings privately, and didn't have the heart to tell anyone.

I think there are going to be 100's of broken dreams. Probably already happened by now.


Mark

Wow, $30,000 to $40,000 for a trashed catamaran with no rigging and a broken hull! What a racket. They made a killing from the fantasies of dreamers. I would expect the wrecks you described, to go for one quarter of what they went for. It's a shame that there are people willing to pay those prices for junk. It just encourages the people who sell them.
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