In Praise of Crealocks - SailNet Community
 19Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 16 Old 02-26-2016 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Cleveland, OH
Posts: 387
Thanks: 40
Thanked 24 Times in 24 Posts
Rep Power: 5
 
In Praise of Crealocks

I'm not really sure of the point of this thread or whether it will go anywhere, but I really want to share my admiration for Crealocks. I feel fortunate that on my very first boat purchase, that I have what seems to be one helluva vessel. I didn't really know PSCs before I luckily saw two of them up on Lake Superior. At the time I first saw the two boats (one 34 and a 37), I distinctly remember that it felt like a 'real' boat, in comparison to everything else I had seen. And I had looked at a lot of boats.

What really brings this up is that up on the Great Lakes, everyone is hauled out. As I go over to work on my boat, I walk past many others, and notice that their underbodies clearly explain why the Crealock rides out even the very highest and short waves that Lake Erie can dish out with aplomb, while others stay tied up to the pier. Afraid, and rightly so, that they'll be pounded to death.

All the racer/cruisers have very little in the water near the bow, and they are quite flat. No wonder they can't take even mildly rough water. I really wonder if that gains them that much in the way of speed or maneuverability. The Crealock can turn quite smartly. And if you cut through rather than bounce over waves, don't you move more quickly, and it's less hard on the crew?

I also notice the poor condition of most of the gelcoat (on all but the newest boats). Even though mine is 22 years old, and needs some compounding to bring her back to a nice luster, it's clear the the quality of the molds from which most boats are built doesn't even come close to the PS molds. Very smooth and even. Plus, it's amazing how many boats have print-through of the roving (or possibly cloth). Not even a glimmer of that on my Crealock.

As the yard painted my mast, they had another boat's spar in the paint area as well. Our masts were of similar cross-sections, but I think the other mast was not nearly as heavy a gauge of metal. The other boat's mast also had a good bit of taper and was 15 feet or so longer. In addition, he had a very worrisome 'crinkle' in the aluminum near the lower spreader. In other words, the Crealock mast is built to very heavy scantlings.

Just very happy to be part of the Crealock family.

-- Bill
elliowb is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 16 Old 02-26-2016
Senior Member
 
Lake Superior Sailor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Eagle River Wi.
Posts: 1,105
Thanks: 2
Thanked 16 Times in 16 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
Re: In Praise of Crealocks

Definitely a solid built boat with the feel of a ship through out! AAA. A craft to be proud of.....Dale
elliowb likes this.

Reluctant Lady
Cal 28, 1967
Lake Superior
Where God got it done!
Lake Superior Sailor is offline  
post #3 of 16 Old 02-27-2016
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Virginia
Posts: 179
Thanks: 146
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 5
 
Re: In Praise of Crealocks

I quite agree. The Crealock designs resulted in solidly-built, high quality boats. No boat can be all things to all people, but this one is the closest I have come across! My first boat was a Catalina 27, which was a great little boat - easy to sail, extremely maneuverable under power, simple. When I decided that I needed a boat capable of crossing oceans safely single-handed, my exhaustive research led me to my current boat - the Pacific Seacraft 34 Voyagemaker. Since then, I have taken a course in naval architecture, and it only confirmed that I made the right choice! I'm currently "trapped" in Lake Michigan, but look forward to being back in saltwater soon.
elliowb likes this.
kbbarton is offline  
 
post #4 of 16 Old 02-27-2016
Member
 
valis's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 52
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 16
 
Re: In Praise of Crealocks

The Crealock hulls don't get up and surf like the faster / flatter designs, which can make a huge difference in downwind sailing speed. The Crealocks don't pound nearly as much either. I love my PSC Crealock.

Paul Elliott
S/V VALIS - PSC 44 #16 - Friday Harbor, Washington

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
valis is offline  
post #5 of 16 Old 02-27-2016
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 33
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 0
 
Re: In Praise of Crealocks

I agree. These boats are superb. They are in a different class. But let's be clear: the magic is in the combination of great design, for which W.B. Crealock gets the credit, and great build quality, for which Pacific Seacraft gets the credit. It's that combination that makes these boats so special.

Periwinkle
--
Boat for sale ad removed per forum rules- Jeff_H SailNet moderator

Last edited by Jeff_H; 03-03-2016 at 10:48 AM.
S/VPeriwinkle is offline  
post #6 of 16 Old 02-27-2016 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Cleveland, OH
Posts: 387
Thanks: 40
Thanked 24 Times in 24 Posts
Rep Power: 5
 
Re: In Praise of Crealocks

Quote:
Originally Posted by valis View Post
The Crealock hulls don't get up and surf like the faster / flatter designs, which can make a huge difference in downwind sailing speed. The Crealocks don't pound nearly as much either. I love my PSC Crealock.
In the course of learning about my new PSC34, I powered out into Lake Erie from Cleveland harbor during a very strong northern blow. Small craft warnings were posted, but I wanted to get a feel for how she handled in fairly inclement water conditions. I was alone (I need more friends that are as crazy as me) and new to the boat, so I didn't raise any sail, but she handled the very steep short frequency waves with ease under power. No pounding at all. I didn't even take much water over the bow. I was happily amazed that she did so well. I suspect that she would have handled even better with the added stability of some sail.

I suspect that under the correct conditions, even a Crealock will surf. I sailed trans-Atlantic on a 100 foot schooner and I was at the helm when we surfed down some massive mid-Atlantic swells. It can be done on a full displacement hull.
elliowb is online now  
post #7 of 16 Old 02-27-2016 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Cleveland, OH
Posts: 387
Thanks: 40
Thanked 24 Times in 24 Posts
Rep Power: 5
 
Re: In Praise of Crealocks

Quote:
Originally Posted by S/VPeriwinkle View Post
I agree. These boats are superb. They are in a different class. But let's be clear: the magic is in the combination of great design, for which W.B. Crealock gets the credit, and great build quality, for which Pacific Seacraft gets the credit. It's that combination that makes these boats so special.

Periwinkle
--
pacificseacraft37.com
Absolutely!! I completely agree.

Having only recently moved to a place close enough to a substantial body of water and about to leave my fifth decade of life, I didn't really want to wait around too long to get a boat. So my boat shopping occurred while most of the vessels were in the water. This made it difficult to get a real feel for their underbody. Lines drawings are hard to come by and the profile drawings just don't do justice to the major differences between underbodies. WIB Crealock really seems to have done a nice job of balancing the trade-offs. Further, having been an engineer, in a former career, for a production powerboat company, I know something about FRP boatbuilding. Pacific Seacraft doesn't appear to have cut any corners during production. A great combination.

Last edited by elliowb; 02-28-2016 at 12:24 AM.
elliowb is online now  
post #8 of 16 Old 02-28-2016
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 33
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 0
 
Re: In Praise of Crealocks

Quote:
Originally Posted by elliowb View Post
Absolutely!! I completely agree.

Having only recently moved to a place close enough to a substantial body of water and about to leave my fifth decade of life, I didn't really want to wait around to long to get a boat. So my boat shopping occurred while most of the vessels were in the water. This made it difficult to get a real feel for their underbody. Lines drawings are hard to come by and the profile drawings just don't do justice to the major differences between underbodies. WIB Crealock really seems to have done a nice job of balancing the trade-offs. Further, having been an engineer, in a former career, for a production powerboat company, I know something about FRP boatbuilding. Pacific Seacraft doesn't appear to have cut any corners during production. A great combination.
For anyone looking for a serious cruising boat -- one that will sail well AND keep you safe -- I recommend doing all you can to find out what owners of that type of boat say. Do that with the popular brands of boats and you'll find limitless complaints. Try that with a Pacific Seacraft and you won't find that -- it's mostly praise for how well they are built and how well they sail. That's one reason we went with this brand of boat. That and, as implied in one of the other replies, they just feel safe. That's because they are.

Periwinkle
--
pacificseacraft37.com
elliowb likes this.
S/VPeriwinkle is offline  
post #9 of 16 Old 02-28-2016
Member
 
valis's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 52
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 16
 
Re: In Praise of Crealocks

Quote:
Originally Posted by elliowb View Post
I suspect that under the correct conditions, even a Crealock will surf. I sailed trans-Atlantic on a 100 foot schooner and I was at the helm when we surfed down some massive mid-Atlantic swells. It can be done on a full displacement hull.
Well there's surfing and then there's surfing. I've had my PSC44 up beyond 13 kts when we had a spinnaker up with good wind and big swells. That's way beyond what would be considered hull-speed, and we were pushing aside a whole lot of water.

But, we were on the hairy edge of control. The force required to get us up to that speed was incredible, and we were far from stable. With the slightest mistake in steering we would have rounded up or down and ended up on our side. Which has happened a few times and I've got the splintered spinnaker poles to show for it. This is why I actually prefer cruising to racing.

A boat that *wants* to surf will remain under easy control and the loads remain manageable as the speed goes up. My boat is not one of these. But my boat feels great in tough conditions, nothing creaks and the doors still open easily when we are hard-pressed.

This reminds me of another reason I love my boat. The bridge-deck is as high as the cockpit coaming. While this means we have to climb up and down to get below, it also means that the cabin stays dry. We've been pinned down after a round-down, with water over the coaming and the cockpit awash (cushions floating away, etc.), the portlights showing green water and fish, and even with the washboards stowed and the hatch open the cabin remained dry. On some other boats there would have been serious downflooding.

In 2014 we were sailing south from Washington to San Francisco, getting ready for the 2014 Pacific Cup. Around Cape Blanco (near the OR/CA border) we found ourselves in 45 kt winds with over 60 Kt gusts, and probably 15-20ft waves. True, it took some effort on the helm, but the boat took care of us in some pretty awful conditions. My crew, who have mostly sailed on more lightly-built and "racier" boats were quite impressed with how the PSC was handling things. Here's a link with some pictures: The Friday Harbor to San Francisco Delivery in Pictures VALIS
brokesailor and elliowb like this.

Paul Elliott
S/V VALIS - PSC 44 #16 - Friday Harbor, Washington

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Last edited by valis; 02-28-2016 at 02:36 AM.
valis is offline  
post #10 of 16 Old 02-28-2016 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Cleveland, OH
Posts: 387
Thanks: 40
Thanked 24 Times in 24 Posts
Rep Power: 5
 
Re: In Praise of Crealocks

Quote:
Originally Posted by valis View Post
True, it took some effort on the helm, but the boat took care of us in some pretty awful conditions. My crew, who have mostly sailed on more lightly-built and "racier" boats were quite impressed with how the PSC was handling things. Here's a link with some pictures: The Friday Harbor to San Francisco Delivery in Pictures VALIS
The words 'roaring good sail' come to mind after reading about that trip! While the photos of the sea-state are very good, I'm sure that they only convey a fraction of what it looked/felt like in person.
elliowb is online now  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Anyone know of any Crealocks lost at sea? cshrimpt Pacific Seacraft 8 12-13-2015 10:46 PM
Microwaves vs. Crealocks'... svjobeth Pacific Seacraft 9 02-13-2014 07:29 AM
Praise for Myerchin Somawas Gear & Maintenance 0 06-05-2007 10:26 PM
MacGregor 26: to praise or bash JebButler Boat Review and Purchase Forum 9 04-18-2006 08:38 AM
In Praise of the RDF Tom Wood Seamanship Articles 0 08-10-2004 08:00 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome