psc 34 jackline configuration - Page 3 - SailNet Community
 12Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #21 of 33 Old 07-08-2017
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Virginia
Posts: 187
Thanks: 149
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 5
 
Re: psc 34 jackline configuration

Mr. Murdoch,

Sorry - dumb question: what is "the forward bail on our genoa turning (or foot) block"?
kbbarton is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #22 of 33 Old 07-08-2017
Senior Member
 
pdqaltair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Deale, MD
Posts: 3,694
Thanks: 4
Thanked 130 Times in 128 Posts
Rep Power: 12
 
Re: psc 34 jackline configuration

Quote:
Originally Posted by elliowb View Post
That is a great idea Bill. I haven't used my jacklines yet, but after reading this thread I decided to get them out and see how things would work. Well, I'm not sure if the PO ever used them before either because it sure doesn't seem like they will work. I hooked one end to the pad eye a the forward end of the cockpit and stretched it out along the side of the cabin trunk. I'm left with at least 10 feet extra when I get up to the bow. Since it's flat nylon, it doesn't cleat-off well, even with three full figure eights it easily slipped.

Did you install the cleats on the bulwarks yourself? I've been in the anchor locker recently to reinstall the windlass, and it doesn't seem like it would be very easy to reach up to the spot where your cleats are secured. If you did install them yourself, did you also add a backing plate? Aluminum possibly? If so, I suspect that it isn't glassed in, but still should help spread the load. Any help would be appreciated.

IMG_5491 by Bill, on Flickr

IMG_5493 by Bill, on Flickr

IMG_5494 by Bill, on Flickr

-- Bill Elliott
PSC 34
Belle Voile
Just so you know, that stitching pattern in nylon webbing is probably less than 50% strength. I've done a lot of testing of sewn nylon, and anything other than a very compact bar tack is weak because of differential stretch. A knot is stronger, but still far less than World Sailing standards.
elliowb and toddoh72 like this.

Writing full-time since 2014
Author--Rigging Modern Anchors

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

"Keeping a Cruising Boat for Peanuts"
"Faster Cruising for the Coastal Sailor"
"Singlehanded Sailing for the Coastal Sailor"
pdqaltair is online now  
post #23 of 33 Old 07-08-2017
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: The house is in Kingsport, TN. Boats are on Watauga Lake and in New Bern, NC
Posts: 638
Thanks: 18
Thanked 91 Times in 80 Posts
Rep Power: 14
 
Re: psc 34 jackline configuration

Quote:
Originally Posted by kbbarton View Post
Mr. Murdoch,

Sorry - dumb question: what is "the forward bail on our genoa turning (or foot) block"?
It's not a dumb question at all. It is just words that I dreamed up on my own because I did not know what the real words were.

What I am calling a "forward bail" is the bit of curved round metal ahead of the sheave of the block. It is the forward continuance (lower left in the photo) of the metal that supports the upper end of the sheave axle. I thought it looked like the bail of a pail.
wsmurdoch is online now  
The Following User Says Thank You to wsmurdoch For This Useful Post:
kbbarton (07-09-2017)
 
post #24 of 33 Old 07-08-2017
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Cleveland, OH
Posts: 407
Thanks: 40
Thanked 24 Times in 24 Posts
Rep Power: 5
 
Re: psc 34 jackline configuration

Quote:
Originally Posted by pdqaltair View Post
Just so you know, that stitching pattern in nylon webbing is probably less than 50% strength. I've done a lot of testing of sewn nylon, and anything other than a very compact bar tack is weak because of differential stretch. A knot is stronger, but still far less than World Sailing standards.
Thanks for pointing that out. Once I've figure out exactly the length that I need for the jackline, I was planning on taking the line to the local sailmaker and have him re-stitch. However, I hadn't realized that the type of stitch is important too. Makes sense though. When I examine the stitch more closely, it really does look amateurish and poor workmanship. That's not something I like to see on anything that I trust my life to.

I also was wondering about the strength of the carabiner. I can't find any stamp on it indicating working load, so I'm suspect that it may be insufficient.
toddoh72 likes this.
elliowb is online now  
post #25 of 33 Old 07-16-2017 Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Key West, FL
Posts: 22
Thanks: 23
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Re: psc 34 jackline configuration

Just wanted to say Thank You again for posts. I ultimately purchased Wichard's Lyf'Safe Jackline system because it was the most convenient (but definitely not cheap!). For the aft attachment point, I'm installing a Wichard folding padeye (with backing plate) on the outer cockpit combing. This area is easily accessible for installing the backing plate from the aft quarter berth below and will ensure that the lines lay as flat as possible on the deck. I'm using the forward bow cleat for the forward attachment point. Besides this post, the most helpful information I found was the in the Practical Sailor E-Book called "MOB Prevention & Recovery." I highly recommend this read! I found the Wichard Lyf'Safe Jacklines on sale at Defender, but it's not currently available. Here's a link to where you can purchase them now: Wichard LyfíSafe Jackstays.
toddoh72 is offline  
post #26 of 33 Old 11-27-2017
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Fl
Posts: 9
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Re: psc 34 jackline configuration

Had the same thing happen to me. Started using clean line tucked in. I would also say on a calm day at anchor put on your harness clip onto the jack line and climb over the side. You wonít sleep for a while.
My other 2 cents auto inflatable pfd with harness , NIGHTMARE. I donít like the autos anyway . Once again jump over and youíll find you canít swim at all once they inflate. Now imagine dragging down the side with a balloon around you .
One hand for yourself and one hand for the boat is no joke. I usually go crawling or butt sliding if itís really bad, but Iím old now and try not to get in the sporty stuff too often.
Safe sailing
elliowb likes this.
Capnbh is offline  
post #27 of 33 Old 11-28-2017
Senior Member
 
pdqaltair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Deale, MD
Posts: 3,694
Thanks: 4
Thanked 130 Times in 128 Posts
Rep Power: 12
 
Re: psc 34 jackline configuration

Quote:
Originally Posted by elliowb View Post
Thanks for pointing that out. Once I've figure out exactly the length that I need for the jackline, I was planning on taking the line to the local sailmaker and have him re-stitch. However, I hadn't realized that the type of stitch is important too. Makes sense though. When I examine the stitch more closely, it really does look amateurish and poor workmanship. That's not something I like to see on anything that I trust my life to.

I also was wondering about the strength of the carabiner. I can't find any stamp on it indicating working load, so I'm suspect that it may be insufficient.
World Sailing jackline strength requirements are based on breaking strength, not working load limit. Very likely, the locking carabiner is strong enough. Unsurprisingly, jackline, tether, and climbing gear standards are closely related (although there are important differences). Do be certain to grease the carabiner several times each season or it will seize.
elliowb likes this.

Writing full-time since 2014
Author--Rigging Modern Anchors

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

"Keeping a Cruising Boat for Peanuts"
"Faster Cruising for the Coastal Sailor"
"Singlehanded Sailing for the Coastal Sailor"
pdqaltair is online now  
post #28 of 33 Old 11-28-2017
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Cleveland, OH
Posts: 407
Thanks: 40
Thanked 24 Times in 24 Posts
Rep Power: 5
 
Re: psc 34 jackline configuration

Quote:
Originally Posted by pdqaltair View Post
World Sailing jackline strength requirements are based on breaking strength, not working load limit. Very likely, the locking carabiner is strong enough. Unsurprisingly, jackline, tether, and climbing gear standards are closely related (although there are important differences). Do be certain to grease the carabiner several times each season or it will seize.
Thanks for the information. I just did a google search on World Sailing jackline strength and came across an article that appears to be a very thorough treatment on the subject.

https://www.morganscloud.com/2016/11...tion/#comments

-- Bill
Belle Voile
PSC 34
elliowb is online now  
post #29 of 33 Old 11-28-2017
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Fl
Posts: 9
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Re: psc 34 jackline configuration

iMHO using anything other than a jack line and bowline your asking for trouble. Stitching wears and breaks carabiners fail and rust. If you trust the webbing and your knot tying skills , why would you add something that could break? Probably doesnít look as cool and tidy but will keep your butt on the boat! I know the harness has that as well but it doesnít sit out in the sun , hopefully.
Hereís what strange In That article, his idea of separate jacklines at the mast when he has mast pulpits right there? I would hope they were strong enough to clip onto. Also Iím sure your using double line on your harness? It makes life a lot easier.
Safe sailing and hope none of us ever have to test these theories.
elliowb likes this.
Capnbh is offline  
post #30 of 33 Old 11-28-2017
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Cleveland, OH
Posts: 407
Thanks: 40
Thanked 24 Times in 24 Posts
Rep Power: 5
 
Re: psc 34 jackline configuration

Quote:
Originally Posted by Capnbh View Post
iMHO using anything other than a jack line and bowline your asking for trouble. Stitching wears and breaks carabiners fail and rust. If you trust the webbing and your knot tying skills , why would you add something that could break? Probably doesnít look as cool and tidy but will keep your butt on the boat! I know the harness has that as well but it doesnít sit out in the sun , hopefully.
Hereís what strange In That article, his idea of separate jacklines at the mast when he has mast pulpits right there? I would hope they were strong enough to clip onto. Also Iím sure your using double line on your harness? It makes life a lot easier.
Safe sailing and hope none of us ever have to test these theories.
My beam is only 10' 0" so I don't think that a centerline jackline is feasible. I'm going to stick with a jackline on each side. However, as to knots rather than stitching, I know that knots in typical running rigging line can easily reduce strength by 50% or more. I'm not sure that stitching has that same effect on strength. My initial guess would be that it doesn't, for the simple reason that a stitched loop is more like a splice, and a well done splice can maintain 90% of the lines strength. Then again, maybe I'm over thinking this whole thing.

-- Bill
Belle Voile
PSC 34
elliowb is online now  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 5 (0 members and 5 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Jackline attachments Barquito Gear & Maintenance 13 06-20-2013 07:01 PM
Jackline system Joel H. General Discussion (sailing related) 22 05-01-2013 10:50 PM
Name this light configuration sailboy21 Seamanship & Navigation 8 11-11-2010 05:29 PM
Jackline Breaking Strength sailak Gear & Maintenance 5 05-28-2009 12:14 AM
used PSC-34's x 2 in san diego, x 1 PSC-31 in dana point AlexHazzard Pacific Seacraft 0 08-18-2007 02:44 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome