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tomperanteau 06-12-2015 12:28 PM

Canning Your Food
 
The wife and I have learned over the past few years, to can our own food. Lately while making our plans, she decided that there were a few things she did not want to be without while sailing out. Butter, bacon, and a few other things.

This video is of how we canned bacon.

Canning - Bacon - Sailing Vessel Footprints

miatapaul 06-12-2015 03:22 PM

Re: Canning Your Food
 
I have read that the canned butter out of New Zealand/Australia is supposed to be really good. I have always wanted to try canning but have never done it.

tomperanteau 06-12-2015 04:48 PM

Re: Canning Your Food
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by miatapaul (Post 2845961)
I have read that the canned butter out of New Zealand/Australia is supposed to be really good. I have always wanted to try canning but have never done it.

We canned butter, too. Need to do a view about that. The butter came out really good, and should last for months to years. Great way to store things. The bacon came out crumbly, but tasted like bacon. Will probably use it in salads and mixing with eggs.

We've done beans, chili, carrots, tomatoes, chicken, pea soup, and probably some other things I've forgotten.

miatapaul 06-12-2015 05:22 PM

Re: Canning Your Food
 
I have friends that can. The New Zealand butter is supposed to be better than fresh US butter. I have not found any locally though.

Sent from my XT1080 using Tapatalk

aloof 06-12-2015 05:35 PM

Re: Canning Your Food
 
There's plenty bacon from San Pedro all the way until just before Indonesia. No need to can it really. But it will be nice to have the canned 'out there '.

Cannot bacon be cured and stored unrefrigerated for months? Maybe some smoked or cured ham cuts could be taken instead...prosciutto?

travlin-easy 06-14-2015 10:00 PM

Re: Canning Your Food
 
Yes, bacon is usually cured, both sugar and salt cured, then smoked and will last for many, many months. Salt pork was a staple of life for the Union and Confederate armies of the United States during the US Civil War. It was usually carried in a pouch and not refrigerated. It did, however, go rancid after a few months of being transported in a canvas pouch, but this was mainly from contamination as the troops waded through swamps and forded rivers, thereby washing off the salt and allowing various forms of bacteria to infiltrate the meat. So, they just cooked it longer to kill the bugs, then soaked their hardtack biscuits in the grease to make them more palatable.

Many years ago, when I was a young kid in the US Navy, I frequently hitchhiked home along US Route 17 and 301 from Norfolk to Baltimore. Along the way I often saw signs for sugar cured hams and bacon, and those hams and bacon slabs were displayed by hanging them on twine and suspending them from a wooden beam in the stores. One day I decided to buy a slab of bacon and a large ham. The taste was incredible.

All the best,

Gary :cool:

miatapaul 06-14-2015 10:11 PM

Re: Canning Your Food
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by travlineasy (Post 2850138)
Yes, bacon is usually cured, both sugar and salt cured, then smoked and will last for many, many months. Salt pork was a staple of life for the Union and Confederate armies of the United States during the US Civil War. It was usually carried in a pouch and not refrigerated. It did, however, go rancid after a few months of being transported in a canvas pouch, but this was mainly from contamination as the troops waded through swamps and forded rivers, thereby washing off the salt and allowing various forms of bacteria to infiltrate the meat. So, they just cooked it longer to kill the bugs, then soaked their hardtack biscuits in the grease to make them more palatable.

Many years ago, when I was a young kid in the US Navy, I frequently hitchhiked home along US Route 17 and 301 from Norfolk to Baltimore. Along the way I often saw signs for sugar cured hams and bacon, and those hams and bacon slabs were displayed by hanging them on twine and suspending them from a wooden beam in the stores. One day I decided to buy a slab of bacon and a large ham. The taste was incredible.

All the best,

Gary :cool:


Yes, I have had dry cured, and hung hams and they are really good, but I have not seen dry cured bacon in 30 years or so. Not sure if you can buy it anymore. Hams yes, but I imagine they would not do much for your blood pressure.

Welcome to the 21st century.

Yofy 06-15-2015 05:24 AM

Re: Canning Your Food
 
In the 90's on a small boat without a refrigerator, we canned a variety of foods before setting off for a year of cruising. At that time we chose to can because we didn't like commercial canned goods. Also being a vegetarian, I was concerned about food additives. In the end we found some of our canned foods to be really useful and others not so.

So much is readily available everywhere these days and we rarely use canned foods anyhow. We tend to stock more dry provisions like rice, other grains and lentils.

With so many boats relying on refrigeration today, the art of canning tends to get lost. And there also is the issue of storing the canning jars. If I was to can again another time, I would can local foods that wouldn't be available down the line... like fruit jams, salsas or chutneys. I also think home canned meats would be a thousand times tastier than commercial products.

Robyn

MikeOReilly 06-15-2015 08:08 AM

Re: Canning Your Food
 
I've never canned, but I do dehydrate all manner of foods for our journeys. I dry all manner of fruits and veggies, plus various types of meat. I built a solar dehydrator now that we're transitioning to full-time cruising.

I'm interested in learning about canning as well. Another thing to add to the education list :eek.

Tbone 06-15-2015 10:07 AM

Re: Canning Your Food
 
I grew up canning with my dad. I'm growing a garden right now specifically to can enough food to last me until next summer. I've got enough tomatoes going to make spaghetti sauce, salsa, whole and crushed canned tomatoes (great for soups), canned green beans, peas, potatoes (if kept in a cool, ventilated place, red potatoes will keep six months without doing anything to them. Yukon Golds last a little less time). I've got squash to can, cucumbers for pickles, tons of peppers to dry, to grind into paprika, chili powder, jalepeno powder (by the way, the best chorizo I've ever had was something I made, using homemade jalepeno powder in place of crushed red pepper. The taste was ten times better!) Also have onions and garlic. I might even get a few more chickens to cut them if I can come up with a decent way to can them. I know you can buy canned chicken in stores just like canned tuna and other fish. I think I'll make some basic soups from chicken and veggie stock and can those too.

On his first voyage, Captain Cook took ten pounds of onions for every man on board, and twice that amount of potatoes I think. Onions are a super food and carry a lot of antioxidants and build the immune system. I'll try to do the same since I eat a lot of onions. I also plan on doing a little gunkholing and devoting several days periodically entirely to gathering food like oysters, mussels, clams, crabs, fish, etc. I think I could steam crabs, oysters, and mussels, put them in a light salt brine, and can them aboard, so long as I bring a pressure cooker with me. I also want to transition my home brew to brewing aboard. Being able to brew a beer that is craft brew quality for $2.50 a six pack is hard to beat. And it's fun and gives you something to do.


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