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post #11 of 33 Old 10-14-2015
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Re: MOB Best Practices

I may differ a bit on the advice here, but we're of similar age. The Puget Sound sailing your planning on doing will hopefully be timed for reasonable weather conditions and seas. The San Juan's are beautiful. When we were there, it wasn't very windy, visibility sometimes was low due to fog, and there's lots of current in spots.

Under these circumstances, I'd train my partner to lower the sails, and power back to me. Then, I'd figure out a way to get back on board when I'm still not numb, and then with assistance if disabled. In fact, I think that's you're number one issue. Try it on a warm day, take a swim at anchor and see what it's like.

Yea, if you fall overboard in big seas offshore, you're probably dead at our age. I agree with that. I'd be more worried about falling overboard under benign conditions, or even at anchor, and not being able to get back on. That's something you can do something about. I know of a case where someone in my neighborhood simply fell of a dock in the winter, and came darn close to loosing it. Your probably not going to be harnessed on board during cocktail hour.

I do agree, if going off shore, or inshore in challenging conditions, just stay on board.
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post #12 of 33 Old 10-14-2015
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Re: MOB Best Practices

Good point about being able to get back aboard. Lots of freeboard. Rig your swim ladder (or any boat ladder) so that it will unfold into the water with the simple tug on a lashing. The most memorable story I recall was from the lead instructor at my Instructor Qualification Clinic for ASA candidates. His friend drowned at a marina trying to get back aboard his own boat, tied up in her slip. He fell into the water. He could not unhook the swim ladder. The lead instructor recommended the simple step above. It would have saved his friend's life. Just a slip knot will do. Make the bitter end long enough to hang over the side close to the water. One tug and the ladder steps unfold into the water. Do this at the dock, at anchor, or at a mooring.

Last edited by tellemark32; 10-14-2015 at 04:53 PM.
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post #13 of 33 Old 10-14-2015
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Re: MOB Best Practices

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Originally Posted by eherlihy View Post
DavePM started a thread on MOB recovery elsewhere in sailnet. Here it is; https://www.sailnet.com/forums/seaman...procedure.html
The article linked to in Dave's first post is excellent and well worth reading.
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post #14 of 33 Old 10-15-2015
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Re: MOB Best Practices

Get a MOM. Man Overboard Module.


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post #15 of 33 Old 10-15-2015
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Re: MOB Best Practices

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Originally Posted by celenoglu View Post
The best advice I have heard is:

Do not fall overboard..
As an answer to the question:

So what should I do about dying?: Don't die.
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post #16 of 33 Old 10-15-2015
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Re: MOB Best Practices

IMO,

at age 66 myself, while the lifesling is a nice product, it won't do the job by itself on most small sailboats, which have limited crew, also made up of older people like me.

In my 19 foot sailboat, things have to be ready to go, and the person needs to come out very very quickly.

To get them out quickly in 55 degree water(where I sail in Northern Maine), I need two things that lifesling does not provide:

1. The ability to get to the person very very quickly

2. The ability to get them out of the water easily.

For number 1, you need very quick motor power(because they will not fall overboard in a gentle calm sea), and for that there is only one thing that will work: an already mounted Torqeedo Electric OB. You roller furl the jib, and let out the main, and reach back and put the Torqeedo into the water, turn it to WOT, and head back. You can do this in maybe 40 seconds max. This part of the option will cost you $1900US. Starting your OB, takes too long---you need to simply turn a switch and move right away.

For the second option, you need three parts:

a. You need to be trailing a knotted floating poly prop line on the side of the boat that does not have the Torqeedo mounted. It has to be poly prop because it has to be floating. If you are not trailing it, then you should have it in the cockpit to toss out. A loop at the end allowing the POB to put it over themselves if possible would help.

b. Everyone on board should have a harness over their PFD(needless to say, no one who sails with me does not have a PFD on at all times). This will cost about $75 per person on board.

c. When you get to them, you need to get them on board immediately. They will weigh in at over 250 lb with wet water. Up here, many people die while attached to the boat, but the people who are in it simply cannot lift them on-board. Small sailboats don't have winches and available lines. So this means that you have to attach a winch come along in a permanent attachment to the mast, so that you can drag the person up the side of the boat to the gunwale. This item will probably cost you about $200US to set up. You hook the winch come-along hook to their harness.

Then you will need a sleeping bag, or a DC operated electric blanket with a space blanket to get them warm while you head to the closest dock, which where I sail could be 3 or four miles away. (http://michaelaaronsonmd.com:8080/ac...ow-voltage.htm) You will of course need a big battery on board, hopefully you have at least a 75 GEL Cell.

To deal with this takes more planning than most people are willing to do. And it takes training for everyone, and it takes tethers for everyone. 99.44% of boaters won't do this. Heck more than 50% won't even wear a PFD. You should hear the grumbling I do when I tell them they have to put one on to ride in my boat.

Do I have all this? Most of it, except for the tethers and the electric blanket, I have. But none of it is set up. Maybe next year.

Last edited by Zarathu; 10-15-2015 at 09:05 PM.
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post #17 of 33 Old 10-16-2015
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Re: MOB Best Practices

We have practiced many times with our Lifesling and lifting tackle--I am not as strong as my husband but with our tackle setup, it's completely doable. I'm more concerned with keeping the MOB in sight--our club had a fatality last year. He went overboard in a snotty storm during a race and was not found for 24 hours and he wasn't wearing his PFD.

To get back to the OP's question, safety depends on many choices, the first of which is choosing the conditions carefully.

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post #18 of 33 Old 10-16-2015
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Re: MOB Best Practices

No matter how good you are at the MOB procedures, if you're the only one left aboard, you will lose sight of the MOB. You must have a way of finding them, or nothing else matters.


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post #19 of 33 Old 10-16-2015
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Re: MOB Best Practices

Quote:
Originally Posted by joyinPNW View Post
We have practiced many times with our Lifesling and lifting tackle--I am not as strong as my husband but with our tackle setup, it's completely doable. I'm more concerned with keeping the MOB in sight--our club had a fatality last year. He went overboard in a snotty storm during a race and was not found for 24 hours and he wasn't wearing his PFD.

To get back to the OP's question, safety depends on many choices, the first of which is choosing the conditions carefully.
You have a 35 foot boat. What you can do with the life sling in a boat that big is way different than trying to use a life sling in a smaller one, even as small as the 24 footer that you had before the 35 footer.

Last edited by Zarathu; 10-16-2015 at 08:27 AM.
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post #20 of 33 Old 10-16-2015
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Re: MOB Best Practices

I agree with most of the points here and would add a couple of things. A GPS or chart plotter with a MOB button is essential when only two are on board and one of those goes over the side. The person left on board is too busy getting the boat stopped and turned around to keep an eye on the person in the water. Practice this with one person doing everything. I don't agree with the idea that people only go over when conditions are nasty. When it is bad we tend to be extra careful and do crawl and make sure we have good holds. On nice days all it makes is an usual wave like a motorboat wake to throw off our (perhaps overconfident) balance. Getting back onboard is a challenge and you need to work out how this will be done. It will be different for every boat depending on height of freeboard, stability of the boat, and the kind of equipment that you have or can afford.

I only have personal knowledge of two people who have gone overboard. One was off a 25' Shark during an overnight race. He had his tether in his hand and was coming on deck to attach it when the boat was partially knocked down. He drowned. A good lesson is to disconnect (and connect) the tether from the harness inside the cabin rather than at the boat end. The second person went over on the lee side of a 34' between NYC and Bermuda wearing a harness in 30+ knot conditions. The next big wave threw him back onboard no worse for wear than a lot of bruising. It would have been much worse if he went over on the windward side, although there were three others on this boat so they probably could have hauled him back onboard.

After the refit we have decided to sell Ainia. We want something smaller that would be could for the light summer winds of Lake Ontario, although we plan to spend at least a couple of winters in the Caribbean before heading north.
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