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post #11 of 21 Old 09-18-2018 Thread Starter
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Re: Best Anchor for Weeds

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Originally Posted by celenoglu View Post
Most of the trials are carried by the anchor manufacturers. In Turkey nearly all Gulettes use admiralty because they generally anchor on weed ground. I know a lot of cases where admiralty was holding while modern anchors were dragging in the same weed area.
Of course. Anchors hold better in sand and medium mud, and those materials are more uniform. They are also the bottoms you try to anchor over when it counts. I've done a lot of anchor testing, including rock and weeds, and you can't generate pretty data, graphs, or defensible comparisons for rock or weed because of the variability.

I've cruised in 3 boats. Two were light weight multihulls (less than 2000 pounds) and one was a cruising catamaran (9000 pounds). The first two used mostly rope and the latter mostly chain. Horses for courses. But the anchors were similar (much different size).

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post #12 of 21 Old 09-18-2018
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Re: Best Anchor for Weeds

Youíre asking for side by side comparisons? Itís nearly impossible for anchor manufacturers to scientifically provide for standard conditions to compare two anchors. I canít see any of our anecdotal experiences really have any scientific merit. Even when I know Iím in a grassy anchorage, I donít dive the anchor. For all I know, Iíve grabbed some random sand. Iíve also been in some anchorages with several positive holding reviews, only to attempt several drops that would not withstand backing down. Again, different standards for what is holding in the fist place.


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post #13 of 21 Old 09-18-2018
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Re: Best Anchor for Weeds

I donít know whatís best, but Iíve done fine with my slightly oversized rocna and all-chain rode. My weediest times were in the Bay of Quinte and the 1000 Islands.

I let me anchor settle in for a while before starting to dig it in. This seems to get it through the forest and down onto the bottom.

I think bigger, as in heavier, is best. This is where weight really does matter.

Why go fast, when you can go slow.
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post #14 of 21 Old 09-18-2018
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Re: Best Anchor for Weeds

A Bulwagga anchor is best in weeds. Unfortunately, it is no longer made.

The only failure we have ever had with our Rocna was in thick kelp - and even then it took an intense 50kt thunderstorm to unset it. It came up with ~100lbs of weed ball on it and no mud, so it never made it down past the weed, but did dig into the thick weed enough to hold for 3 days of 15-25kt steady winds before letting go in a blast.

I have had spectacular failures with Danforths in weed, but have never used a Fortress in weed.

Our old Delta actually didn't do too badly in weed. It would always drag, but slowly and consistently. It never suddenly pulled out and let the boat go unexpectedly like the Rocna did. It was more of a calm "well, looks like we are dragging again - let's watch and see what happens" thing.

We could never get our old CQR to set in weed.

We could never get our old Bruce to hold in weed, although it always seemed to set.

I haven't tried our Spade in weed, but suspect it would act like the Rocna, only maybe bury a bit further due to lack of roll bar resistance.

The only thing I think an admiralty anchor is good for is desperately hooking rock or coral as a last gasp effort to hold still. I threw ours away.

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Re: Best Anchor for Weeds

An anchor that will pierce.
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post #16 of 21 Old 09-18-2018 Thread Starter
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Re: Best Anchor for Weeds

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An anchor that will pierce.
Obviously?

Factors include:
* Fluke angle to shank and shackle attachment.
* Angle the toe is presented to the bottom. In other words, a fisherman's anchor, Northill, Claw/Bruce, and Mantus press the toe into the bottom. Others basically start on their sides.
* Sharpness. Of course, any anchor can be sharpened. Sure that takes off the galvanizing, but if you anchor much, it doesn't seem to matter much. I've done this to some knockoffs and it helped a great deal. How much will depend on the anchor and how you sharpen it.
* Clog resistance. This includes both mud and weeds, which are different.
* Other stuff I've forgotten, like balance, fluke shape, and on and on. The usual stuff.

Something to consider is that while the fluke may penetrate, the shank and chain will probably be held on top of the root mat. Will it be like pealing sod? Clearly this depends on the depth of the roots. It also makes it sound like you should not sharpen too much of the fluke, only the very tip.

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post #17 of 21 Old 09-18-2018
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Re: Best Anchor for Weeds

Back when I fished the West Coast from Mexico to Ak., all the commercial boats used the Northill anchor, most on cable. Other than the Danforth and old-fashioned anchors there wasn't much else available back then, but the Northill did hold best in the kelp beds. I still carry a folding stainless steel one as my #4 anchor, but it doesn't get much use in the Caribbean, except in tropical storms.

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post #18 of 21 Old 09-18-2018
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Re: Best Anchor for Weeds

I think not all weeds are created equal. Around here, weeds often mean flooded forest. My local river is almost all flooded forest. Was flooded in the 1840s to create a 125 mile military barge resupply route. Most of my regular sailing areas are some kind of man made reservoirs.

The St Lawrence is an extreme example. When they created the St Lawrence Sea Way in the 1950s, not only did they flood forest, but they flooded 9 towns in the process as well.

This is not an area where I would use expensive anchoring gear.

That's the plus to an admiralty, fisherman, Danforth (although I personally don't like Danforths in weeds) or an imitation Bruce or any kind of cheap anchor that can be replaced at a garage sale for 20 or 30 bucks. You can leave it behind without the stress of losing 300 or 500 dollars worth of ground tackle. Get your anchor wrapped around a tree root or an old telephone pole, cut it and replace it with your equally cheap spare anchor until you can get to a garage sale.

The Northill looks interesting, never heard of it, googled it, apparently designed for use on sea planes. Reminds me of a fancy version of a grapnel.

Nearly had to cut my anchor loose a couple weeks ago on the St Lawrence. Hooked a piece of bottom junk. We estimated it was about 80 lbs, took my wife and I about 40 minutes to get it up. I horsed she tailed, no winch on board, tiny foredeck, so had to work it from the cockpit. Never did figure out what it was. But got some pictures of it.

I can see the appeal to expensive anchors in areas with fewer dead heads.
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Re: Best Anchor for Weeds

Have had trouble with the Rocha in thick weed. Have had it sit on top. Found unlike my usual drop if you start 20í up from where you want it and then drop 5-10í or so more depth than required then slowly drift or back down then start your real drop it will pierce the weeds and reach the bottom. Guess that brings the tip in contact with the bottom instead of having sit on top.
Also it will tangle up a bunch of weed and fool you in to thinking you have a good set. When anchoring in weed is a time when you do want to go up to fairly high revs to make sure you have a real set. With the rocna, particularly in loose mud, tend to do better waiting quite a long time to check set or not check at all for hours as long as you arenít obviously dragging.
In the Caribbean even in a weed bed you usually can find a small patch of sand so itís worth searching around some and avoid it. Itís a big advantage being able to see the bottom.

s/v Hippocampus
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Re: Best Anchor for Weeds

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Originally Posted by Arcb View Post

This is not an area where I would use expensive anchoring gear.

That's the plus to an admiralty, fisherman, Danforth (although I personally don't like Danforths in weeds) or an imitation Bruce or any kind of cheap anchor that can be replaced at a garage sale for 20 or 30 bucks. You can leave it behind
I can see the appeal to expensive anchors in areas with fewer dead heads.
This is a nice thought, but kinda defeats the whole point of an anchor, if you aren't using the best anchor to hold your boat when things get bad.
It would be much cheaper and safer to use a trip line to get out your fouled good anchor, rather than use one with inferior holding power when you need it most.

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