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Waveracer200
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am currently working on a project sailboat and came across something I can not find on the internet. When I was sailing I could not figure out where to connect the jib to in the bow of the boat. There does not seem to be a hood roller furling system or it is just missing? Not sure if it is missing something or I am just simply doing it wrong. attached are some pictures of the items in the bow. There is also a picture of a part that says Hood on it. what is this used for and what is it called? I looked up rigging hardware and can't find it anywhere. There are also two hooks that I have not a clue what they are for they are in the first image. Thanks for your time and I hope someone can help me out really soon! :)
 

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It looks like you got an older headfoil setup.. but not roller furling.

The two hooks are 'tack hooks', the tack cringle on the headsail is meant to go onto those hooks. There are two of them so you can hoist a second sail before you drop the first.

The "Hood" 'horseshoe' shaped piece is a prefeeder.. with a luff tape sail, you would hook on the tack, feed the luff tape through the prefeeder, then into one of the foil grooves (there should be obvious 'openings' to the grooves themselves) before attaching the halyard. The prefeeder makes the job of feeding the luff tape into the groove much easier, you don't/shouldn't need someone up there to help it along, as is often the case without a good prefeeder.

The spring inside the lower foil has got me.. not sure what that's for but if it's in the lower barrel it shouldn't alter what I've said above. The prefeeder is meant to hang on that short pennant, it will get dragged up with the sail and prealign things for you. If the luff tape has been properly cut, the prefeeder will fall off the sail and be ready for the next hoist.

You probably have two jib halyards.. with such a setup you can completely hoist and trim a new, different headsail before you take the other one down.. it's a racing setup that works very well once you get the tricks down..

Good luck!
 

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Waveracer200
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks so much Faster!!! This has helped me a lot! My next mission is to figure out what the magic box does and where it would connect to. I am going to post another thread with picture since I do not know how to add more pictures here.
 

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Waveracer200
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the response to the Magic box issue zz4gta. :)There are two on my sailboat one seems to be labeled Cunningham and is located aft starboard of the mast. Another magic box is located on the port of the boom and more toward the aft of the boom. I have attached pictures of their positions in this replay (images 1 and 2).I can add more images of the one on the boom if need be.
Another confusion I have is how I tie the lower back of the main sail to the boom. I also added lines to where I think the lines would run.(images 5 and 12). If my diagram is wrong is there a diagram that I can follow? It will be difficult for someone to explain and for me to understand without a diagram or an example photo. And as for the front of the main lower part of the sail does it connect to the hook in the picture that I posted.
A Third question that I have is in the 4th image I posted it is located in the bow of the mast. Does this connect to the jib (head sails)? It does move up and down (not all the way up the mast though).
The final question is about a strip that goes up the bow of the mast (images 10 and 11). What is this used for? I have no idea on this one. I don't see how it would connect to the main mast if it does.
I also included images of my sails. I am somewhat confused on which are which sails as I have pictures of each and I am confused on which is which. For instance, it looks like I have a Staysail, jib, main sail, and possibly a Genoa sail or spinnaker. I have a total of four sails. Looks Like I have to post up several reposts to get all the images up.
Also please note the images may not be in order that I thought that they would be when I wrote this.
 

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The track up the front of the mast, with the ring fitting on it is for your spinnaker pole.. it's meant to move up and down to 'level' the pole depending on the conditions and how 'high' the spinnaker is being carried - being level maximizes the pole's projection outboard. (Do you still have a spinnaker pole?)

The hooks at the gooseneck fitting (forward end of boom) are for your REEFING tack cringles.. your main tack should be fixed to another eye or pin more or less permanently. Use the reef hooks the same as you'll use the headsail tack hooks at the bow (quick on/off)

Looks like the magic box on the mast is indeed for the cunningham - it's a bit of overkill IMO, and it would seem that the boom mounted magic box is likely for your main outhaul tension - but without being there in person it's hard to see just what the leads are for the various lines. Honestly for a 27 footer I think both those magic boxes can go to the dumpster or onto Craigslist.

An 'in boom' tackle similar to this would work fine for an outhaul tensioner...



Somebody put some effort into setting this boat up for racing at some point - it may take a while to sort it all out.
 
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Re: The four sails

Feeeew this took a while to post all this and add words to pictures. Glad I know how to use paint:) Here are the four sails.
What you've labeled the 'main' actually looks quite 'new'. It seems to have batten pockets but looks almost more like a jib with it's limited roach.

You likely don't have a 'staysail', probably 2 or 3 jibs/genoas.

That looks like either a very tired spinnaker, but more likely what used to be called a 'drifter' - ie a 170% genoa that was made of spinnaker cloth for very light breezes.
 
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Waveracer200
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The track up the front of the mast, with the ring fitting on it is for your spinnaker pole.. it's meant to move up and down to 'level' the pole depending on the conditions and how 'high' the spinnaker is being carried - being level maximizes the pole's projection outboard. (Do you still have a spinnaker pole?)

The hooks at the gooseneck fitting (forward end of boom) are for your REEFING tack cringles.. your main tack should be fixed to another eye or pin more or less permanently. Use the reef hooks the same as you'll use the headsail tack hooks at the bow (quick on/off)

Looks like the magic box on the mast is indeed for the cunningham - it's a bit of overkill IMO, and it would seem that the boom mounted magic box is likely for your main outhaul tension - but without being there in person it's hard to see just what the leads are for the various lines. Honestly for a 27 footer I think both those magic boxes can go to the dumpster or onto Craigslist.

An 'in boom' tackle similar to this would work fine for an outhaul tensioner...



Somebody put some effort into setting this boat up for racing at some point - it may take a while to sort it all out.
Faster, No i do not have the spinnaker pole. I bet you it is lying down somewhere at the marina that I got her at! They didn't even know what sails belonged to her or which was what sail.lol So glad I grabbed them all. lol I thought that there was only 2 sails per boat. learned that is not true at all!Learning lot about sailing for sure! ok wll I am going to bed I will message your more tomorrow and reread what you wrote so I can fully understand it all. And yes someone definitely rigged her up for sailing. Someone told be about who owned it before me but they said it was an older lady who just hungout on the sailboat.
 

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Freedom isn't free
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I never knew the Cal 27 was such a hard core raced sailboat.
Looking at portsmouth numbers, starting at 89 for version 1, and 87 for version 3, I suppose they are terribly slow at least.

Faster (and others) have you covered.

This is gonna be a tough boat for a newbie to sort out... OP will be a helluva sailor when he's done.
 

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Waveracer200
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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
Re: The four sails

What you've labeled the 'main' actually looks quite 'new'. It seems to have batten pockets but looks almost more like a jib with it's limited roach.

You likely don't have a 'staysail', probably 2 or 3 jibs/genoas.

That looks like either a very tired spinnaker, but more likely what used to be called a 'drifter' - ie a 170% genoa that was made of spinnaker cloth for very light breezes.
What I found interesting Faster is that the jib looking sail but may be the main has reef points(small flag strips if i said this term wrong). I should note that they are located going upward towards the side where the 90 degree angle side.The side that is most vertical. The side i placed the orange arrow. can jibs also have those? Also what are batten pockets? Many thanks by the way! :) by the way what are batten pockets?
 

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Re: The four sails

What I found interesting Faster is that the jib looking sail but may be the main has reef points(small flag strips if i said this term wrong). I should note that they are located going upward towards the side where the 90 degree angle side.The side that is most vertical. The side i placed the orange arrow. can jibs also have those? Also what are batten pockets? Many thanks by the way! :) by the way what are batten pockets?
Some jibs do have battens, and some jibs do have reef points.. Sorry, but the pictures are too distant to be able to make out much detail. The shape of that sail still looks more like a jib to me... and on second glance I'm not sure I'm actually seeing pockets - could just be the glued broadseams I'm seeing.

Without actually being there it's hard to say. I don't see the normal headboard you'd expect on a mainsail either.. the good news is that whatever it is, it's new/crisp enough to hold the folds.

Batten pockets are sewn-in pockets for battens, which are stiffening pieces that insert into the leech of the sail to support the roach.

Here's a picture that illustrates the idea:

 
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