SailNet Community banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I'm thinking about purchasing a 1971 Hobie 16 in great condition. My only apprehension is that it's 1971. Does anybody know if there there any problems with this earlier model? And was there a big difference in performance between that age and a 1980s model?

Thanks in advance.

-Jess
 

·
Don't Call Me Railmeat
Joined
·
6 Posts
You absolutely need to inspect for soft spots in the hulls. I bought a 1979 in 2006 that had spongy soft spots forward of the pylons and abaft the aft pylons too just by the gudeons.

Older Hobies are pretty susceptible to delamination and the foam deteriorating between the fiberglass sandwiching. You'll want to just walk around the hulls and push firmly on the topsides and around the beam where the turnbuckles are too. Those are some common weak points. If it feels squishy, I'd be hesitant to buy the boat unless it was a really stellar buy.

To give you reference, it took me a solid two weeks of work to inject epoxy into the aft soft spots and I ended up putting thru-hull port holes in the forward areas to try and dry out the hulls too. Bottom line - it's a pain in the ass.

Ask about how much water they typically have to drain from the hulls too and inspect the bottoms where she gets drug along the beach. Also look around the pintles for cracks too because it sucks when they break off.

I'd suspect there will be a slight performance handicap between the 71 and an 80s model. The 70s boats tend to be heavier...if you aren't racing then no big deal because you'll still have an absolute blast with the boat.

Also I'd inspect the standing rigging. If it's original, definitely replace it - no questions asked. Hobie now makes a longer forestay too than they did in the 70s & 80s so that you can rake the mast further back. More mast rake = higher pointing = easier upwind travel. Any rust on the shrouds is bad news bears too.

Sails - probably faded and worn if originals, but again, you'll still have tons of fun with them. Just make sure there aren't any major rips or tears...especially on the bolt rope because that's annoying. Get some sail tape and expect to make minor patches periodically.

Chances are you're going to have to replace things like the sheets, rudder cams, and maybe trap wires too - so give those a look. If the sheets look gross and rotten/moldy - get new ones. If the rudder cams are all chewed up and worn down - replace. If there's rust anywhere on the trapeze wires - definitely replace. I had a crew take a drink when his trap line broke once (his boat not mine). Hilarious, but annoying.

Another thing to consider is the mast. I'm assuming it's still original 1971 mast in which case it's probably silver and all aluminum. Bear in mind that Hobie switched to a "Comp-Tip" upper mast piece which is composite plastic for a few reasons. 1 - plastic doesn't conduct electricity and supposedly Hobie sailors back in the day had a problem with trailering their boat through parking lots and getting electrocuted. 2 - the comp-tip gives much better mast bend versus the aluminum mast. Better mast bend = better sail shape = more speed!

Get yourself a spare pack of ring-dings too.

Welcome to Hobie world!
 

·
Catamarans are the best
Joined
·
101 Posts
you said it was in great condition.. that means you have no worries. even if it's in fair shape and less than $500 and includes a decent trailer, I'd buy it. Can't buy that much fun for $500 very easily nowadays. Parts are very easy to come by and you'll learn a lot about boat maintenance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,264 Posts
Not to be crass, but what's the price? For an older Hobie in sail away condition I still wouldn't spend all that much. There are a lot of newer small catamarans available that I would look at before spending more than say $1,000 on a fourth year old boat.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top