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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,

I recently purchased an 81 Hunter 27 with the 8HP Yanmar diesel. Got a good price on the boat, and it's currently having some rigging replaced. But my question is about the fuel system. It appears the fuel tank is located beneath the cockpit floor and doesn't have a gauge on it. So, how are you supposed to determine the fuel level?

Thanks for any help and ideas,

Mike McIntire
 

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Hello all,

I recently purchased an 81 Hunter 27 with the 8HP Yanmar diesel. Got a good price on the boat, and it's currently having some rigging replaced. But my question is about the fuel system. It appears the fuel tank is located beneath the cockpit floor and doesn't have a gauge on it. So, how are you supposed to determine the fuel level?

Thanks for any help and ideas,

Mike McIntire
Mike,
I have a gauge on my diesel tank, but I do not trust it. I fill the tank, note the engine hours, and then track hours after that. I burn between 0.5 and 0.6 gal per hour. Works for me.
Jim
 

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If your filler tube is a straight shot, there is always the "dipstick" method . . I have a wooden one on my boat . . . Non functional gage . . .
 

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Just keep track of the hours you use it. Heck I had an MG in college that did not have a gauge and I just filled it up ever couple hundred miles, you know just about every time it went into the shop....

Heck I lived for 6 months without a starter.

The general consensus (though there seems to be some disagreement on this) that you want to keep the tank full and not let it get very empty. This keeps condensation down as there is less air for condensation to come from. Others say run it almost out to keep the fuel freshly swapped out. Without a gauge, I would just top it off well before it got low. You want more rather than just enough anyway. You really don't want to run out when you are out there, and have to get back to the harbor and wind is not cooperating.
 

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If your filler tube is a straight shot, there is always the "dipstick" method . . I have a wooden one on my boat . . . Non functional gage . . .
Like he said.

Until I replaced the old steel tank on my boat with a semi-opaque plastic one I kept a wooden stick (about 20" or so) tucked in a corner of the lazarett for just such use.

I've also seen a few older boat with sight tubes on the side.
 

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There is a gage on top of tank. You have to be a contortionist to see it with a extension mirror. You kind of lay in the starboard lazzerate, hold the telescoping mirror over the top of tank and read the gage...too much trouble. It's only a 10 gallon tank . Fill it 2x a year with a 5 gallon can. I had 20 hr runs with mine and used approx 3 gallons @ 4t's . Just keep it full and avoid the condensation, and use fuel preservative. Your filters are your friends, take care of them.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for all the replies. If there is a gauge on top of the tank I'll figure out a way to view it. I'll also try the dipstick method.
 
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