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Beneteau 30E
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I should've come here for advice before I bought her, but here we are. I liked the boat, even on the hard, mast down, cushions stored, wrapped in a tarp. I have to move her from Lake Ontario to Lake Erie next spring, but I'm not brave enough to try the Welland Canal, so I guess I'll be paying the freight.

I'm not a great sailor. My first boat was a Tanzer 7.5 that I lost in a windstorm at the end of my first year. So how much trouble am I in if I want to singlehand a 30' Beneteau out of Port Dover?
 

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I'm not a great sailor. My first boat was a Tanzer 7.5 that I lost in a windstorm at the end of my first year. So how much trouble am I in if I want to singlehand a 30' Beneteau out of Port Dover?
Congrats on the new-to-you boat.

I'd say one needs a degree of confidence, in order to think straight, while single handing. Had you been single handing the Tanzer? Did whatever caused her loss shake up your confidence, or did you lose her at the slip in a storm. We'll probably need a more specific question to provide useful feedback.
 

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Beneteau 30E
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Congrats on the new-to-you boat.

I'd say one needs a degree of confidence, in order to think straight, while single handing. Had you been single handing the Tanzer? Did whatever caused her loss shake up your confidence, or did you lose her at the slip in a storm. We'll probably need a more specific question to provide useful feedback.
The Tanzer was picked up and dropped by a 133kph wind from her cradle on the hard. I don't have much confidence in single handing, but that's due to lack of experience. I passed the Sail Canada Basic Cruising course, but I didn't go out solo yet. My largest concern has always been docking.

I have resources, though. There's a guy who's been helping me, and the sailors in my marina are helpful. I could go out on their weekly races, hopefully with an experienced crew member or two so I could learn my boat. I think I know what I have to do, I just need spring to come around so I can get out and do it. Until then, I'll be nervous.
 

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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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The Beneteau 30E was a very nice design for its day. The deep draft, standard rig version should sail well in a broad range of conditions and be moderate easily to handle short-handed. These boats typically had a three or four sail inventory (155% #1 Genoa, 110% #3 Genoa, and some had a 135% #2 Genoa) when you are learning to sail the boat short-handed, I suggest that you use the 135% #2 Genoa, if you have one. That sail will work across a wider wind range than the other two. But if not then use the #3 until you feel more confident.

You need to set up and practice reefing the mainsail. Typically, on these boats,, it is better to reef the mainsail in too much wind, rather than try to sail with a partially furled jib.

I do a lot of single-handed sailing and also coach people who are learning to single-hand. I find that it helps a lot to practice the choreography of doing each maneuver while you are at the dock with the sails down, in order to figure out where to stand and how and where to move your body during a tack, jibe, reef, docking etc. Then simply go out and practice sailing the boat trying that choreography.

Over time you will develop the skills you need and as those skills increase, so will your confidence increase.

For what it is worth, no matter how skilled any of us are today, we all started where you are now. And no matter how skilled any of us are, we all go through a learning curve every time that we step on a new boat.

Jeff
 
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Beneteau 30E
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks, Jeff, that's good information. I know that what I lack most is experience. I'm also not as cocky as I used to be (I just turned 67, but still pursuing my dream of sailing). With some more coaching and practice I'll do okay, I think. I don't intend to sail great distances, and though Lake Erie certainly has its moments, it's not like the open seas.

One thing I have is a love for the water, and that gives me the enthusiasm to push myself and get out there. I really do feel more excited than nervous about it all, which I think is a good thing.
 

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Figure out your personal weather minimums and then tap on that door a little at a time, until you become more comfortable.

Single handed docking is the tough part, but there are all sorts of tricks. One of the best is to leave a different colored line on your slip, which will be the go-to spring line. Either leave on something easy to retrieve or have someone hand it to you. So much easier to ask for the "red" line than try to describe which line you want. Also, you can throw a spring line around a cleat and retie it to the boat. In either case, you should be able to be in idle power against that spring line and hold the boat against the dock, until you run out of fuel.

One step at a time. You'll figure it all out. Cheers.
 

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Beneteau 30E
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yeah, it's just a shame I have to wait so long for the next step. Spring seems so far away.
 

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I owned the same boat for two years. She sails very nicely, but ultimately was sold quickly due to several factors.

There are no opening ports and only three small hatches so if you'll be staying on board in warm weather, buy one or two windscoops and install a supply of fans.

She sleeps seven by not one bunk is long enough for someone 5'10" or wide enough for two people. Hopefully you are not too tall and are single.

Never let go of the tiller when operating under power, or she'll do an immediate 360 in a half-boat length

For racing, the boat never sailed to its rating because the spinnaker was too small to hold the lead you could often establish upwind, downwind much of the fleet would roll over you. So skip the racing side.
 

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I am sailing a 1984 First30E and do a good amount of single handling. She is very agile but can handle stiff breezes and wave action well. I love this boat (but I think every owner loves it's ride :) ).
As said before, reef the main early and better have a 2nd reef point on the main ready if it goes 25+.
Docking and mooring is easy as I can handle the 7600lbs holding onto a rope.

Going through the canal I assume it will be mostly motoring - what cruisign speed do you get and how confident are you in it's durability?
I have no experience with locks, but the most difficult taks seems to be to hold the boat steady off the walls whilst going up/down? So any deckhand without sailing experience could do this...
 

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Moody 376
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spring is a long way off, but you have ample time now to get her ready. check the lines need new halyards, with the rig down its a one man job. check top of the mast electronics need new wires, check and retape all your split rings and cotters that are up the mast. new spreader boots? make a pig tail for a small 12v batt and plug in to the lights on the mast to make sure they all work, change light bulbs.

with the rig down, it will never be any easier to do some of the work/preventative maintenance.

personally id think you'd be able to find someone willing to make the trip with you so you don't have ship it. it looks like it could be done in a (long) day.
 

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Beneteau 30E
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks, guys. I had a survey done yesterday, and I'm more familiar now with the boat's issues. (Any boat that's almost 40 years old will have some issues.) I'm probably going to have the boat freighted to my marina, and then I'll have my surveyor go over her again while rigging her. I know that a boat is a revolving expense, which is okay with me if I get the joy of sailing.
 
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