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Hello, I just bought a Flicka 20 with a yanmar 1gm10 engine that hasn't been maintained for about ten years(boat and engine). She starts though. I had a mechanic friend help me run through the basics. We cleaned out the water lines, changed the oil and found water inside when checking the oil (He didn't think it had water in for too long, only after we cleaned the lines out did it start to leak). Then proceeded to change the water pump which was leaking. After changing the oil a second time the low oil pressure light/buzzer wouldn't shut off. It had not gone off yet, only after the water pump and fresh oil. The oil had been drained the second time through a plug near the bottom of the engine. My friend wanted to do some research, but he is stumped as to why it still has low oil pressure. Any thoughts? Thank you for your consideration.
 

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Your post is a little unclear.

Your low oil pressure sensor should give you a low oil pressure alarm as soon as you turn on your panel prior to starting the engine and the alarm should continue to sound until the oil pressure builds up to a safe pressure. When you shut the engine down the oil pressure alarm should sound after the engine stops until the panel is turned off.

What started to leak after cleaning the lines...the water pump?

What was the source of the water in the oil? Or have you found out?

Have you cleaned the oil pressure sensor? It is easily removed (normally) and has a small hole in it that allows pressure to operate a switch to open the low oil pressure alarm circuit. If that little hole is clogged you may be able to clean it out without damaging the switch.

The oil pressure sensor is a relatively low cost item that is readily available at Yanmar dealers regionally and on line.

If you can find a gauge of the right range (0 to about 40 psig) that will fit the sensor hole with the right threads you can measure the oil pressure.

If you think the old sensor is no good you may be able to drill and tap the "other end" of the sender to take the threads of a gauge and then thread the modified sensor into the block to measure the oil pressure.

The oil pump is gear driven and is a low failure rate item. The gear drive is at the front of the engine under the gear case cover. The pump itself can be accessed by removing the oil pan on the bottom of the crankcase (engine removal required).

If the engine hasn't been serviced in ten years I recommend you bite the bullet and pull the engine. Do a good inspection internally - pull the head and the crankcase oil pan and gear case cover. Check the exhaust manifold clear of corrosion product buildup and clean it. Replace the exhaust elbow. Replace all hoses and belts. Fix anything you find out of tolerance and replace any part that corrosion demands be replaced. Clean and de-rust and paint the engine.

Check the condition of the engine mounts and replace them if necessary.

If the boat is on the hard replace the cutlass bearing and repack the shaft stuffing box and realign the engine and shaft carefully.

Do all these things well and you will minimize expense.

You will learn a boat load of things about your engine and boat that will allow you to maintain it well and fix it when you are the only source of man and brain power.

You will also prevent countless lost hours of boat time by avoiding the cycle of fixing one thing at a time on a system that is not ready for reliable service.

You may even avoid the heartache of losing your boat (or hurting yourself or somebody else or their boat) when the engine fails in a channel with wind and tide unfavorable for sailing to safety.

Good luck.
 
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First thing I would do is get a pressure sensor. Take it to nappa (auto parts) and see if they can cross reference it to a common one. If it was not going off before you started this work, as it should it could well be a sensor.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the input. pressure sensor seems like an easy fix, but not as likely since it had "high pressure/worked" hours before the first time we changed the oil. possibly pulling the motor and looking into the gear that drives the oil pump is another big option. I appreciate the ideas!
 

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the water pump to my memory is driven from the motor and not a pully. Correct? If so, then the second time you checked the oil, you found water again? Am I reading your notes correctly? If this is true, your inner seal in your waterpump is shot an allowing water to enter the oil. In any case, your best bet is to rebuild the waterpump, kit about 50 bucks, replace all hoses, inspect your exhaust port where the water mixes to cool the exhaust, most are eaten away. Your front and rear main seals most likely need replacing as well. If you buy a complete gasket/seal kit and replace them all you will not regret it. The engine is small light and simple as a lawn mower engine. The manual tells you step by step how to take apart and put back together. I have a Flicka an it has as Yanmar YSB-8 engine and I plan to rebuild it as I am restoring it now. I also have one finished in the water getting the bugs out for summer use. If you do a partial, you will have something else leak, bite the bullet and also get new pencil zincs for the motor. been there with this thread. look up your local yanmar dealer in your state and give them a call for parts as they got them. good luck!
 
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