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Dave, check the PC fan specs - 95 CFM = 5,400 CFH. Remember, Dave, good writers research their information before writing it.

And, I guess the restaurants in Seattle are a bit different than those in Spokane where I lived.

All the best,

Gary :cool:
 

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I don't remember - don't you have a vent in the companionway boards? If not a drop in screen will provide some ventilation.
No, the single companionway board does not have a vent. It swings down from the sliding hatch cover.

The deck hatches originally came with the vents/fans.
 

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Dave, check the PC fan specs - 95 CFM = 5,400 CFH. Remember, Dave, good writers research their information before writing it.

And, I guess the restaurants in Seattle are a bit different than those in Spokane where I lived.

All the best,

Gary :cool:
Gary, i did. They are NOT 50 times more powerful as you stated

The computer fan also require wiring and power while the solar Nicro doesnt

The Caframo is 12,000 CFH on high speed and 8,400 CFH on low speed
Much more air movement than a computer fan with similar or less power draw and can be moved around. It also has replaceable parts and is safe if you get a finger in it. Or a face😀👍
 

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WOW! Now I know of two professonal chefs that don't like or use Old Bay. And, Donna, I agree - too much of any spice can ruin any food.

Gary :cool:
Gary, I do use it in Baltimore style crab cakes, ( not all crab cakes are Baltimore style) , some shrimp dishes, it's not that I don't use it. I use it sparingly t bough as it overpowers the delicate crab meat or everything it comes in contact with

I don't use it on everything like asapargus , French fries or corn flakes. It is too powerful

It's a spice blend. Paul Prudomme had a similar one.

Spokane is not known for seafood BTW . Nice city. Almost In Montana.
Been there twice. The scenery is breathtaking.
 

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Ahhh yesss...Spokane..Brings back child hood memories..living in the community around Liberty Lake..father was a Wing Commander (B-29's)at Fairchild AFB at the time..

Yep..no fresh seafood near there...��
 

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Dave, when I first typed the information about the fans, there was a typo, which was my mistake for not proof reading what I typed on those tiny netbook keys. I made the correction, though, so it now says 5.0 instead of 50. I got that information from the manufacturer's spec sheet. Additionally, those fans are low torque, so fingers being ripped to shreds would not happen. The fan would just stop if your fingers came in contact with the blades, which has happened to me a couple times when I was careless.

As for Spokane, it was probably the most beautiful city I've ever been to in the continental US. Spokane is just 13 miles from the Idaho border and 30 miles from Coeur d'alene, which is one of Idaho's greatest summer resorts. Pretty good drive to Montana, though. The air was so pure that from my living room winder, we could see the snow covered peak of Mount Rainier, which was about 150 miles to the west, and the snow covered peaks of the Cabinet Mountains in Montana, which were about 200 miles east of us. The lakes, of which there were many, were ice cold and crystal clear, great fishing, but only a few were large enough for sailing.

I don't recall any seafood restaurants in Spokane in 1968 when we moved there. Lots of steak houses, and one of the original Black Angus restaurants, which overlooked Spokane Falls, right in the center of town. During the spring run-off, when the snow was rapidly melting in the high country, the roar of the falls was deafening, and you could actually feel the vibration of the falls while seated in the restaurant - scary!

Unfortunately, that facility was closed many years ago, and moved a few blocks away. Not exactly sure why, because it was extremely popular and had a 5 star rating.


Winters there were rumored to be quite mild, however, 20 below zero and 100 vertical inches of snow on the front lawn is anything but mild. The first year we were there the roof of the local Safeway caved in from snow weight. Most businesses with large, flat roofs had them snow blown after each storm to prevent this from happening.

Now, I have lots of McCormic spice grinders here at home, but none on the boat other than sea salt, pepper, Montral Steak Seasoning, and Kickin Chicken, all of which I use on a regular basis. I keep a can of Old Bay on the boat as well, mainly for when I manage to handline up some crabs at an anchorage in the lower bay. No crabs or crab pots in this part of the bay, yet. I saw a few near Worten Creek three weeks ago, but not the large clusters we saw in years past, so I guess they are either prospect pots or maybe there are a few crabs there now.

Compared to you and Shawn, I'm just an amateur cook - I never had to do it for a living. While I've been cooking since I was a 12 year old kid (my mother mandated that all three of us kids learned to cook), for the first 30 years of my marriage, I did all the cooking. My wife never learned to cook until after we were married. When my wife retired, she took over the cooking, which was about 5 years ago. Now that she has bad medical issues, I'm back to cooking all the meals. I never got any complaints, so I guess I must be doing something right, or no one else wanted the job. As an outdoor writer, I wrote a cookbook that primarily deals with wild game and fish. It only has 130 recipes in it, and while I wrote it 20 years ago, I never got around to publishing it. I have posted some of my recipes here, though. Many of my recipes have been published in The Fisherman Magazines, Game & Fish Magazines, The Washington Post and The Baltimore Sun, but that was a long time ago.

All the best,

Gary :cool:
 

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I think in the Chesapeake area Old Bay is both overrated and overused. I've had more than one meal ruined due to the amount of Old Bay the chef used when it would have been near perfect without it at all.
I agree. Too much of anything is ... too much.

Many spice mixes, including Old Bay, have a huge amount of salt. As I understand it Old Bay was originally developed to help bars sell more beer.

Many commercial kitchens (I won't say professional chefs) use too much salt anyway - add a mix like Old Bay and my tongue wants to curl up and run away.

Shawn once pointed out to me that a lot of cooks and chefs smoke and that does change the amount of salt they can discern.

No, the single companionway board does not have a vent. It swings down from the sliding hatch cover.

The deck hatches originally came with the vents/fans.
Ah. I remember. Fussy, and one less option.

I have two dorade vents and three mushroom vents that go through the cabin top.

I think people find drilling through the plexiglass or other plastic hatch cover less intimidating than fiberglass. The vents are often just heavy enough to overwhelm the friction type of struts. I don't think that is good.

Since your original question was about ventilation for fresh air associated with running A/C I'd start with easier things. You might prop the companionway up a couple of inches. You will want a wind scoop anyway (see Breeze Booster - Breezebooster ) so put it on a hatch backwards and prop the hatch under it open a couple of inches. Done, flexible, DIY, no drilling, no wires. *grin*
 

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We can recommend Penzey's Spices - the Fox Point Seasoning is great in eggs, and the Ruth Ann's Muskego Ave Chicken/Fish Seasoning which is also awesome when grilling or sauteing vegetables.

One of the benefits of moving to Maryland was the access to yummy crabcakes - best without a ton of seasoning and filler but with several lemon wedges. I've had Old Bay of course - it is really strong and I prefer a light hand with that sort of spice. My grandmother's crab cake recipe doesn't call for it (maybe the recipe is before the time of the spice, or maybe it's because she was from Delaware).

We do have a windscoop on the boat which I haven't used yet (got it at the EYC flea market for a song). I guess the ventilation issue was for any time the boat is closed up, using the AC or otherwise. I'm NOT drilling holes through the deck LOL. Installing solar fans in the hatches seemed the easiest solution (Jon has a coworker with the right cutting tool). Just not the cheapest solution.
 

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Penzys I have used before. They are good quality and have interesting pre made blends.

Like all pre ground spices there is quite a fall off in taste as well as potency. Most people store their little bottles in spice racks or out in the open where they get compromised by light and humidity. If possible pre ground spices should be stored in a cool dark area and if possible with very little air in the storage container.

I like to buy my spices whole and grind or mortor and pestle when I need them.

I also rarely by dry spice when I can purchase the fresh herb. For example dill, Rosemary , thyme, sage, oregano are not great dried compared the fresh herb. The difference in taste and enhancing dishes is amazing. Making a tomato sauce for instance with fresh garlic, basil and oregano with fresh ground pepper opens up huge flavor profiles from one made from dried items. It doesn't take more time.

You don't have to be a chef to do this either.

This is the biggest difference between families in countries which honor their cuisines like in Europe vs the American quick fix concepts of food. Just a little more care in use of seasoning leads to opening up a world of flavores

I buy my whole dried spices from

Whole Spices | Best Selling Spices | My Spice Sage
 

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...
We do have a windscoop on the boat which I haven't used yet (got it at the EYC flea market for a song). ...
We have a wind scoop that came with our boat. I unfolded it for the first time a few months ago. It's very...purple. No idea how it works but figured we'll try to put it up this weekend. Maybe after a couple of drinks it will fall into place.

Planning to leave Friday and head up the Chester to meet up with our sail club. We'll anchor out somewhere Friday night and meet up with them Saturday to sail to Corsica River YC for their anniversary celebration BBQ, bands, and sail race.

No Old Bay on board. Plenty of Penzey's and Kalustyan's.
 

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We love fresh herbs - one of my favorite Bon Appetit recipes we've nicknamed the "Parsley, Sage, Rosemary & Thyme" potato gratin and you absolutely must have fresh for it (and now my minions, aka kids, help with the herb preparation): Scalloped Yukon Gold and Sweet Potato Gratin with Fresh Herbs. I probably wouldn't make this on the boat but it gets rave reviews at Thanksgiving!

We haven't begun to stock the galley - but I washed and sorted all the galley stuff left by the PO, and I will get around to this soon. I'm just trying to get the boat in order. So all there is on the boat is diet soda, water, and some snacks. The comfort-in-summer level is slowly rising, the safety stuff is mostly taken care of, the electrical and plumbing issues are getting solved little by little... I just want to go sailing again! A dock box is going to become a really good idea shortly.

I'm also trying to figure out our US Sailing/CBYRA/PHRF of the Chesapeake memberships. Jon got a US Sailing individual membership that I just emailed about turning into a family membership. Then we can do the CBYRA and then get our PHRF certificate. I noted that MYC is not a member of the US Sailing MVP program - something I may have to suggest if they want to attract racing sailors who would appreciate the discount.

I think our wind scoop is teal.
 

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...When the guy at West Marine asked how air got in and out of the boat I think I looked at him like he had three heads. You just open and close ports, right? But wait, you are using an AC... so... the tl;dr is that our hatches are supposed to have those solar fans so air can be pulled in and pushed out...
Some of your other responses caused me to go back and re-read your message. Maybe I have misunderstood your comment.

What kind of AC did you ultimately buy? Where is it mounted? How and where are you getting the AC's hot exhaust air out of the boat?

As for general ventilation and dehumidification, AC does a great job while you are on the boat. It can be considered overkill as a dehumidification method while the boat is unoccupied. Also, I have reverse cycle on my new boat, and I do not want to leave that seacock open while I'm away for a week. So I like using a dehumidifier.

A couple of other considerations: some people like to make canvas covers to prevent crazing of their acrylic hatches. Some like to install shades on the inside keep the boat cool and limit fading of upholstry and other UV damage. Some people like to cover the boat during the offseason. Solar vents will not work in these situations. Not a showstopper, but realize some of the compromises that you need to make before plunking down $$$ for solar vents. And as Gary has mentioned, they do have limited lifetime and can leak if not re-bedded periodically (my current beef with my solar vent.

...I always have a wet bilge due to the keel stepped mast...
Blow a fan into your bilge with a Peltier dehumidifier draining into your sink, and you may find your bilge dry when you return to your boat at the end of your week. Since float switches can fail in the "on" position from water intrusion, you may find that your float switch lasts longer also. It is, of course, your choice. I'm just pointing out alternatives for others to consider.
 
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We have a wind scoop that came with our boat. I unfolded it for the first time a few months ago. It's very...purple. No idea how it works but figured we'll try to put it up this weekend. Maybe after a couple of drinks it will fall into place.

Planning to leave Friday and head up the Chester to meet up with our sail club. We'll anchor out somewhere Friday night and meet up with them Saturday to sail to Corsica River YC for their anniversary celebration BBQ, bands, and sail race.

No Old Bay on board. Plenty of Penzey's and Kalustyan's.
We have a wind scoop. Base fits over the front hatch and has as few bamboo dowels to keep it around it. Top has a loop which we use to raise it wit spinnaker halyard to make it a tent with opening facing the bow. Easy Peary. In light breezes it helps a lit
 

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Some of your other responses caused me to go back and re-read your message. Maybe I have misunderstood your comment.

What kind of AC did you ultimately buy? Where is it mounted? How and where are you getting the AC's hot exhaust air out of the boat?

As for general ventilation and dehumidification, AC does a great job while you are on the boat. It can be considered overkill as a dehumidification method while the boat is unoccupied. Also, I have reverse cycle on my new boat, and I do not want to leave that seacock open while I'm away for a week. So I like using a dehumidifier.

A couple of other considerations: some people like to make canvas covers to prevent crazing of their acrylic hatches. Some like to install shades on the inside keep the boat cool and limit fading of upholstry and other UV damage. Some people like to cover the boat during the offseason. Solar vents will not work in these situations. Not a showstopper, but realize some of the compromises that you need to make before plunking down $$$ for solar vents. And as Gary has mentioned, they do have limited lifetime and can leak if not re-bedded periodically (my current beef with my solar vent,
I replied to this and now the reply is gone - grrr! Hope I'm not repeating myself. The site is running slow for me.

The point of the ventilation was for when the boat was closed up, which I would guess includes the times when the AC is used.

We got a mini window unit from Sears. I attached the rail and the right-hand accordion piece and it's in the companionway so the exhaust goes outside in the cockpit area. I used a piece of wood and a couple plumbing parts to adjust height and tilt. I'm using a dish drainer to direct the condensation into the cockpit so it is functioning as a dehumidifier. We can still walk past it no problem and it is relatively light and easy to move. Our quick, inexpensive solution until we decide if we need something else. An oscillating fan on the galley counter moves the air around. So far, it makes the main cabin quite comfortable on low cool.

We have no canvas for hatches. We do have the roller sunshades in the cabin. I'm copying all the advice so I don't forget - thanks!
 

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We cover our boat in the off season with a canvas made for the boat. The dorade is open and we hook a small flexible solar trickle charger to the Nicro unit so there is no issue with fresh air and ventilation.

Since the boat is covered ....we could crack the head and cabin hatch. Plenty of air flow.

In the summer when we get the T storms we have a neat little blue and white mini tent which we put above the front hatch so air can still get in despite any downpour. Donnas canvas protects the hatch way
 

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I have an air scoop that gets used nearly every time I anchor out - works great until the thundershowers hit. I also employ the use of a Highlandtown Bimini (silver, plastic tarp) over the dark blue Bimini, which really does a great job in lowering the temperature in the cockpit. Yeah, it might look a bit on the ugly side, but damned it does a great job.

Today, the winds kicked up in the upper bay from the southwest, great sailing, got down to Betterton, then turned the boat around and sailed all the way back to the marina. Total miles on the iron genny was just 6 miles. Just after passing battery island, I raised the sails and the engine wasn't fired up again until I got back to Havre de Grace and dropped the sails before heading into the marina.

When I got in, the temperature inside the cabin was 89 degrees, way too hot for this old man. This instilled more thoughts about installing a platform on the stern and mounting a genset to run the AC/heat pump. Yeah, I know, 63 db is noisy, but most of the time when I'm anchored out, it's during the week and I'm the only person there. When your lungs are shot to Hell from asbestos, the AC makes it a lot easier to breath comfortably. I also have a portable oxygen generator now that makes life a bit easier. Gettin old ain't fer wimps and sissies. ;)

Gary :cool:
 
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