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Wow! You have a lot of work ahead of you, but I think it will really look great when completed. My sole was made the same way, but not nearly as thick, probably less than 1/8-inch veneer. Fortunately, I was able to just lightly sand it, then clean it with the vacuum and a tack rag, and finally applied three coats of varnish - looks like brand new. I guess I got lucky on this job.

My next project is replacing the rub rails, which will be very difficult, and maybe beyond my physical ability. The old rub rail is constructed of a 2-inch, "U" shaped, rubber cover that covers the deck to hull joint. Well, that rubber cover is no longer made, and the original has completely dry rotted and cracked in several places. I called my friend, and Sailnet forum member, MarioG and FerrettChaser, both of whom are marine mechanics, and they suggested removing the rubber rail and replacing it with 2-inch aluminum channel strips 6 feet long, which would make the curve without trying to make cuts and bends in the channel. Might have to wait till it's warmer to do this, though - cold weather and I don't get along very well.

All the best,

Gary :cool:
Aluminum channel would certainly do the job but it will also damage anything you touch. As long as you're only touching dock pilings that's no problem but as soon as you start rafting up with other boats it might present a challenge. Or are you looking to install some kind of rubber in the channel?

Right now, I'm pondering what type/brand of varnish to use and whether I should use a clear varnish or something darker. The original sole was quite dark. In fact, you could barely see the holly strips but I think that was a function of age.

Whatever I use, it needs to be hard wearing.
 

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They make polyurethanes (and other coating chemistries) specifically for flooring, and many floors are exposed to sunlight (and heavy traffic), so may be good for marine environment. So I'd have a look at household floor paint, and ask tough questions whether a marine product is needed. I guess the main question for boats would be how it holds up to extreme temperature and humidity changes. But whether you get a marine or household product, I'd make sure to get something designed for floors/soles because of the type of wear it will get.

I have a separate but related question: Previous owner put in brand new teak and holly sole just before I bought the boat. It is/was gorgeous. Unfortunately, it sustained a few dents before I got smart and put down a throw rug to protect it. I plan to do the "wet rag ironing" method to raise the dents. Do any of you have experience with this method, and can offer hints for how to make it work best?
 

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Rick, I tried it and it worked to some degree, but the dents did not make the sole entirely flat - just a bit less dented.

I used polyurethane for the sole and added a table spoon of neatsfoot oil, which made it non-slip when wet. It works! I tried it. I used standard, clear, interior/exterior grade, satin finish, which really appears to be high gloss on that sole.

Ajax, the reason my original rail was damaged was from slamming into pier pilings while refueling and some idiot roars past with a 50 foot cruiser throwing off a 5-foot wake. It happened several times while cruising. As for rafting up, I always but out 3 to 4 large fenders that rest on the rub rail. I would not want a rub rail rubbing on my hull. And, my boat sits very high off the water, so my rub rail is often well above the rub rail of any boat I have rafted with.

Good luck on those projects,

Gary :cool:
 

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Hey neighbor. I'm in the Rhode River, one tributary to the south.
Hey, Ajax. I love the Rhode - great place to overnight. Spent a few years at Holiday Hill but I'm back on the South River now. Works a little better for me. I'm a newer member in CHESSS - I think you were the one to send me a welcome email? I hope to participate more on the challenge side rather than the racing side.
Cheers, -Jim
 

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Damn I love winter. 57 degrees! Didn't get to sail very far, but it was much better than nothing.
I've got to figure out how to get rid of this day job so I can take advantage of days like yesterday. My wife even texted me saying let's go sailing...
I owe, I owe, so it's off to work I go.......
 

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Yup. I'm buried deep in two projects at work. Taking time off other than the regular winter holidays is not happening.

The only thing saving me from freaking out, is that my projects have definite end dates in early April, so they won't impede the main sailing season.
I'll have nearly 300 hours of vacation by then and I do plan on telling my boss that I'll be using a good bit of it in 2018.
 

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I'm really getting close to doing a refit on the head... I've been tinkering with ideas. Essentially I want to make the sink much smaller including the counter area and add a folding table and another cabinet.

Other project is to make the current forward cabin drawers to starboard a locker with shelves, currently there is significant wasted space.
 

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We're winding down the 2017 year. It's been great following everyone on this thread. Unlike most forums, we've managed to keep the sniping to a bare minimum and have exchanged some great ideas, experiences, and obviously awesome menus (that are just a bit out of reach for some of us🙂)
My wife and I were treated to some awesome anchorages based on input from this group. Thanks.
Here's to a great 2018.
I'm making a vow to coordinate a rendezvous for all those interested.
All the best,
John and Phyllis
 

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Discussion Starter #1,311
We're winding down the 2017 year. It's been great following everyone on this thread. Unlike most forums, we've managed to keep the sniping to a bare minimum and have exchanged some great ideas, experiences, and obviously awesome menus (that are just a bit out of reach for some of us🙂)
My wife and I were treated to some awesome anchorages based on input from this group. Thanks.
Here's to a great 2018.
I'm making a vow to coordinate a rendezvous for all those interested.
All the best,
John and Phyllis
Ditto John,
Thanks for your input and being a member of the Chesapeake posse🤘🌪😄
Have a great few months
 
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Chastened
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I have finished demolition of the old cabin sole. Next, I cut the bilge board and starboard section and test fit all of the pieces.
So far, so good.

In a moment of fear, I deliberately cut the starboard piece too wide, thinking that I will trim off the excess once I've attached the edge trim to all of the other pieces. (You can always remove excess, but you can't put it back when you cut off too much.) I tried to salvage all of the old edge trim pieces, but ended up destroying most of them when removing them.

Now I'm staring at a 9 foot long piece of Burmese teak I bought, which I need to rip into 1/2" X 3/4" strips about 6 feet long to make new trim pieces.
I have an ancient, Craftsman table saw that I think is demonically possessed. This thing makes RPM's that seem really excessive and it's LOUD. It makes me nervous. Not to mention, it's 19F degrees outside.

If I can just get these trim pieces cut, I could wrap up this project in a few days. Nothing but epoxy and varnish after the trim.

Seeing my boat with no sole is very depressing. The thought of a walking surface that doesn't crackle and buckle underfoot, that I don't have to play "Twister" on, is very enticing. This was the biggest problem with the boat when I bought it. Removing the old sole was like removing multiple layers of paper. It was that bad.
 

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I'm just curious. Do you do epoxy on the bottom surface, and varnish on the top? Or is it some other combination?
 

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I'm just curious. Do you do epoxy on the bottom surface, and varnish on the top? Or is it some other combination?
Yes, penetrating epoxy on the underside and edges, varnish on top. Yes, I could epoxy the top and then varnish, but I didn't feel like delving into product compatibility matrix charts. The varnish I bought should be very hard and clear, and provide adequate protection.
 

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It's still 2017 and I've been working away on my sole.

After much fiddling, I got my new-to-me table saw working properly and ripped a 9' piece of Burmese teak into all the edge trimming that I need to cover the exposed edges of the sole and bilge boards. I decided to replicate the two original bilge boards instead of one, large board. This has to do with how the boards sit on the stringers.

I will finally start epoxying everything today, and permanently attach the trim.
 
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