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No problem Ajax_MD my wife and I were cracking up when we read your post. If you don't like the heat and the bugs you should bring your boat up the Lake Champlain and sail. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #42
Thank you so much for the replies. I have a 1983 Macgregor 25 which has a retractable keel. The draft is around 2 feet with the keel retracted and around 5' 10" with the keel down. I would like to find something within about an hours drive if I can. But may be able to travel a little further if needed. I've had the boat moored on Lake Champlain for the last three years which is only about 22 miles from my house. I normally sail one or two days a week right now but once I'm retired I would like to maybe get out more if I can. Moorings in my area are around $1000 a year and slips run between $1300 to $2100 per year. I don't need power or pump outs if in a slip. But would prefer a mooring or a marina with mast up storage with a ramp to use for launching. I plan to come down in April and do a little exploring of the marinas in the area. Most of my sailing has been day sails so I don't really keep track of how far I've sailed. Most days I would say I most likely cover around 25 to 30 miles.



My son lives in Dillsburg and my daughter is living in Lincoln University so I would like to buy a house somewhere south of Lancaster so I can be close to the grandchildren. Thank you again for any local knowledge you can share. Maybe we can meet sometime for a coffee or a sail.
Good to know.

Lake Champlain is a great area. This will definately be a learning and great experience. More consistent a greater wind, a 9 month sailing season, lots of places to gunkhole and anchor overnight, beautiful changing scenery on the eastern shore, lots of fellow sailors or solitude. Plus more.

From south of Lancaster Willow Valley area you can spread fairly far down the northern part of the
Chesapeake. We’ve kept our boat as far north as the Sassafrass for a couple years. Worton Creek for a couple, The Patapsco for 10 ( Rock Creek) and now Whitehall Creek just north of Annapolis south of the Bay Bridge.

Here are a few GENERALIZIONS ( course I may start a roul here,
The further south you can get the better the consistent wind, especially south of Poole’s Island.
The further south the better chance of wind in the light wi d months.
The further south the better ratio of sailboats to powerboats
The further south the great the number of estuary with coves, towns etc.
the further south the greater the expense is for a mArina generally
Northern Chesapeake has fewer if any nettles
Very very few moorings available. ( Sailing Emporium on the Sassafrass for one) Northeast River Sailing Club is another.

You vessel though isn’t the average sailing vessel which averages 5 knots...even with a jet turbine on it. McGregors can move under power so you may be able to hang further north and still have middle and southern northern Chesapeake in easy range. However I suggest an extra 1/2 hour car ride is worth it to clear the windless areas.

You’ll have many choices and options. I suggest reading through the 2016 and 2017 threads ( many many posts) paying attention especially to what people say about where the keep there boats and where they like to travel .

Get a good marine map , and Navionics or Blue chart ap, and look at there’s creeks and destinations nautically S you would if you traveled to them by boat. Blue ChRts has Active Captain a good basic reassure guide with opinions of boTers.

Once you figure out a general area you would like to explore, then find the marinas close to it. Some of us may be in them and will give you honest opinions.

Remember that you probably will move around in a few years as you gain knowledge and visit places. You aren’t buying a slip. Enjoy yoUr research and ask questions. Many here are nice helpful people...we also have and edge sometimes as we are of course sailors. Sometimes some of us also meet up for a weekend anchor out. Have fun
 

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Worton Creek and Rock Hall are two areas I hope to check out in the spring when I come down. I may also look at Delaware Bay as an option. My Macgregor 25 is not water ballast like the newer powersailers with the big motor. My keel is cast iron and weights about 625 lbs. I have a 9.9 hp Yamaha 4 stroke and my hull speed is just over 6 knots So a longer drive may be what is needed.
 

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Discussion Starter #44
Worton Creek and Rock Hall are two areas I hope to check out in the spring when I come down. I may also look at Delaware Bay as an option. My Macgregor 25 is not water ballast like the newer powersailers with the big motor. My keel is cast iron and weights about 625 lbs. I have a 9.9 hp Yamaha 4 stroke and my hull speed is just over 6 knots So a longer drive may be what is needed.

Like I mentioned the further south the costlier The marina usually. Both Worton and especially Rock Hall good areas

Forget Delaware Bay. It’s a Sailboat death zone.

We transit it most years. Notice I said transit. 85% of the time under motor. Very very few places to go. Major current swings 4-5 knots , some of the roughest water to sail in. Big sweeping T storms with no where to go even with 4 hours notice.

Did I mention rough. Delaware Bay and it’s frequent afternoon square waves when the onshore breeze kicks in at 20 against the current can stop a boat and have it going backwards.

Oh did I mention the NJ stAte bird. The green fly. It draws blood till you kill it. It has squadrons of followers with a “next man up “ mentality. Finds any exposed skin and hides in the reeds and marshes on the NJ and Delaware side lining the Bay and river south of the Salem nuke plant.

Delaware Bay will make you become a powerboater for sure.
 
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Lowest I've ever seen it in the harbor. Pendragon is just out of view top right. Harmony is way out at the end in what used to be 13ft of water.
Wow...never seen it that low. And all that ice! My wife has been sick for the last three weeks, then we had a small fire at home at the beginning of this week; I can't fly when she's not working so it's been a month since I've been down there. Hoping I can get there soon, just to check on the lines and so on.

Take care, it must be tough out there on the dock!
 

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Thank you chef2sail. That information is just what I needed. Knowing the conditions I will not spend anytime looking for a mooring there.
 

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Another thing about so little water in Rock Creek is seeing that the day marks are there for a reason.

Also, I'd never seen ALL of the pilings from the old pier to the north of the pavilion before.
 

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Discussion Starter #48
Thank you chef2sail. That information is just what I needed. Knowing the conditions I will not spend anytime looking for a mooring there.
Lowest I ever saw it at MYC was 6 years ago on a similar blowout tide for thee days.

The green 3 off of the club rocks was walkable in dry sand. Slips up to 14 from the shore, boats were wallowing in the mud held upright ( kind of) by their dock lines. Convinced some of he resident members who were there then to move their slips outward on the piers.
 

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Discussion Starter #49
Just got back from Haleakula the Marina and our bubbler were working perfectly. Whitehall Creek had ice in on by most of the Marino’s clear.

Bald Eagles were in the trees above it looking for food in the open water.

She was floating nicely in her slip with 4ft of wTer under her keel where the lowest we’ve seen is 11 ft. Too low/ dangerous to climb aboard

Our old canvas is still hanging in there as a protectant so no water pools then freezes and expands in critical areas.

The Marina owners are really good and had been wTching the boats and walking the docks
Weather station there showed air temp 13 degrees, water temp 32.5 degrees. Wind 29 steady gusts to 35. Aside from it being brutally cold was a pretty day
 

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Discussion Starter #50
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I shoveled the driveway yesterday and went down to the boat to perform yet another test fitting of my new cabin sole pieces.

I found one bubbler hanging in the open air, so I adjusted it downward until it began churning the water again. My hull was exposed to the keel root but sitting upright, thanks to proper adjustment of the docklines. I really can't complain about the West Marine bottom paint. 2 years and not a speck of growth or a single barnacle.

I'm getting very close to the final fit of the cabin sole but it's somewhere between 3F and 5F here this morning and I just don't know if I want to go down there today. The wind is supposed to finally quit today, at least.
 

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I shoveled the driveway yesterday and went down to the boat to perform yet another test fitting of my new cabin sole pieces.

I found one bubbler hanging in the open air, so I adjusted it downward until it began churning the water again. My hull was exposed to the keel root but sitting upright, thanks to proper adjustment of the docklines. I really can't complain about the West Marine bottom paint. 2 years and not a speck of growth or a single barnacle.

I'm getting very close to the final fit of the cabin sole but it's somewhere between 3F and 5F here this morning and I just don't know if I want to go down there today. The wind is supposed to finally quit today, at least.
Might be best to wait until the boat is floating on her waterline anyway. I wouldn't think that hull flex affects the sole dimensions that much, but you never know.
 

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I'm more concerned about dimensions changing due to the extreme temperatures and very low humidity. I may end up building all of this only to have the sole swell up to trap the bilge boards in the summer. In that case, I'll just plane 1/16th" away on the edge trim pieces but it would still be an aggravation.

I (finally) swallowed my fear and laid a coat of varnish on a scrap piece of sole. I had concerns about how this commercial floor varnish would look. Worried for nothing, it looks great and leveled out nicely. I'm going to lay 4 coats on the test piece before I touch the real sole this week but I think it will look pretty good.

Mostly, I'm just concerned about getting my application skills to par so that the finish is nice and even.
 

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There's something to be said for shallow draft boats. It must be nice to have such a large slip. I have to butter her hips to get her in and out of my slip.
 

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My slip is 20 feet wide, but yesterday, you could have walked on the bottom if it were not for the frozen mud that your would likely have broken through to your waist.

Ajax, did you remember the non skid trick I posted about the cabin sole varnish. Add 1 tablespoon of neetsfoot oil to a quart of varnish and it will be non skid, but it does not change the finish appearance at all.

Gary :cool:
 

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My slip is 20 feet wide, but yesterday, you could have walked on the bottom if it were not for the frozen mud that your would likely have broken through to your waist.

Ajax, did you remember the non skid trick I posted about the cabin sole varnish. Add 1 tablespoon of neetsfoot oil to a quart of varnish and it will be non skid, but it does not change the finish appearance at all.

Gary :cool:
Yes, I remember. I haven't started the sole yet, only a test piece.
 

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There's something to be said for shallow draft boats. It must be nice to have such a large slip. I have to butter her hips to get her in and out of my slip.
My slip is around 14' deep at normal water level. Plus, I think my boat looks like it has a lot of room because its beam is only 7'. Two of my neighbors' boats, tied up to much shallower piers, heeled way over the other day when their bottoms were touching. It looks like in that situation, if you had time and it weren't deathly cold out, it would have been a good idea to either lash a "leg" to keep the boat upright, or rig an extra dockline. This assumes also that you could actually get on (and off!) the boat when it's that far below its normal position relative to the pier.
 

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One of our members hiked about halfway across the North East River towards Charlestown yesterday
...Yes, he had floatation, a sled, ropes and folks keeping an eye on him. And no, I don't understand what would possess him to do it.... :)
No worries about the cracking, he drilled out past the tide line and found it about 10 inches thick. The shiny spots are not wet, they are clear ice like a skating rink.

This is a couple miles north of Havre de Grace where trains crossed the Susquehanna in the winter of 1852 -
http://collections.digitalmaryland.org/cdm/fullbrowser/collection/cator/id/181/rv/singleitem
 

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