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2019 was a mixed season for me....It started out great with lots of sailing in the spring, that included a few quiet overnights in nice places, second place finish in the CHESSS Class (Chesapeake Short-handed Sailing Society) in the Annapolis to Oxford Race, and a First Place in the CHESSS's Gather and Gab race.

During the summer I crewed in the Wednesday night beer can series on a different boat with a different crew than I had raced with for the past 19 seasons. After all of that time, and with the bond that formed between all of us, I really missed racing with the same skipper and crew that I had raced with first on Bonnie's J-22 then her J-70. But I liked learning the new boat and ended up doing a lot of coaching and some rethinking some of the deck hardware set up on the boat which I enjoyed. The skipper and crew were all really nice folks, and so it was fun racing them. Plus the finish places improved greatly over the course of the summer which is how it should be. Clearly I enjoyed my time sailing aboard Starbird. (picture below)

Jeff Sailing by jeff_halp, on Flickr


But I hardly did any sailing on Synergy after May. My father was at the end of his life and so I was spending time visiting with him in Florida whenever I could. He passed on in September, so sailing took a back seat to mourning and trying to keep up at the office. I did find that occasional low key daysailing was at least palliative for me.

Later during the fall, I did the frostbite series on the same boat that I crewed on this summer. Over the fall frostbite season, we were able to continue to become more consistently competitive and improved on crew work and figuring out how to get the most out of the boat.

I am guardedly optimistic that 2020 will be a better sailing year than 2019. I plan to do more of the CHESSS Class races, probably single-handed, and continue racing on board Starbird. I would like to do more cruising and perhaps get away for a several week long cruise down to the southern end of the Bay.

That's about it....except

Happy New Year everyone, welcome to the roaring 20's....

Jeff
 

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Thanks for those kind words, everyone, and I think of everyone here quite often.

Chef2sail, in the next few weeks, I have 4, 6-ounce Kobe steaks coming from Snake River Farms, which is rated very high for this particular type of beef. I clearly recall when you said this is the best of the best, and a good friend of mine in the music world decided to send this to me as a Christmas Present, but it will not arrive until the 8th of January. I'm really looking forward to this and at least once a day I check cooking methods on You Tube for Kobe Beef.

Donna, I sincerely hope you and John finally get in a good season of sailing during 2020. Up until I no longer felt safe climbing on to the cabin top to raise the main and drop the anchor, I was enjoying the 2019 season in the upper bay. The winds were pretty good most days I was able to get out, usually SW at 10 to 20, which for that old, broad-assed Morgan, were just perfect. ;)

I talked with MarioG on the phone a few days ago, he's on his way to Marathon Key, Florida in his 41-Morgan Out Island Ketch with his new girlfriend. So far, she loves sailing and living aboard.

Also talked with Ferret Chaser (Michael), who plans to have his house boat trailered to Tennessee where he recently purchased a couple acres of land. He and Linda will live on the houseboat while he builds a house. They are currently living aboard in Hilton Head Island but said he and Linda are ready to reside on dry ground for a change.

For the past three weeks, we have a contractor coming in daily to renovate our outdated bathroom. What a project, one that I initiated, but Carol and my daughter soon took the reins and good ole dad was relegated to just signing the checks. The progress has been a bit slower than anticipated, the bathroom looks great, so far, and the cost, when completed, will be about half what the entire house cost when I built it 49 years ago - HOLY CRAP! I coulda found a hot honey that liked to sail and have kept the Morgan and have her take me to the Dry Tortugas for that kind of money. ;)

All the best,

Gary :cool:
 

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Had to move my boat from Deale and took the boat farther south to St. Leonard. Still working on the boat.
I made the opposite move in the fall, Flag Harbor to Deale. Deale is between home and work so it's a lot easier to do the odd boat chore now and then.

I had an unpleasant surprise when Herrington Harbor wouldn't take my boat on the hard for the winter, because it's "too old" (1978, decision made sight unseen). I guess they are focused on the rich-people-boat market. I found another nearby yard willing to suffer my presence.
 

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I had an unpleasant surprise when Herrington Harbor wouldn't take my boat on the hard for the winter, because it's "too old" (1978, decision made sight unseen). I guess they are focused on the rich-people-boat market. I found another nearby yard willing to suffer my presence.
Really, "too old"? That's the first time I have heard of that. But then again, many yards in my neck of the woods have the space and are competing for winter storage customers(read Great Lakes).

I imagine Herrington Harbor is looking for those boat owners who hire everything out, to keep their staff busy, but still. Jeesh.
 

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I made the opposite move in the fall, Flag Harbor to Deale. Deale is between home and work so it's a lot easier to do the odd boat chore now and then.

I had an unpleasant surprise when Herrington Harbor wouldn't take my boat on the hard for the winter, because it's "too old" (1978, decision made sight unseen). I guess they are focused on the rich-people-boat market. I found another nearby yard willing to suffer my presence.
That is surprising. They have a ton of room to stack boats and I always thought the main qualification to do anything at HH was a wad of cash.

I know they did just have the experience of dealing with all the boat carcasses abandoned at Shipwright, some of which, I believe may be stacked at HHN awaiting breakdown for the dumpster. Maybe that made them a bit more cautious.
 

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2019 was a mixed season for me....It started out great with lots of sailing in the spring, that included a few quiet overnights in nice places, second place finish in the CHESSS Class (Chesapeake Short-handed Sailing Society) in the Annapolis to Oxford Race, and a First Place in the CHESSS's Gather and Gab race.

During the summer I crewed in the Wednesday night beer can series on a different boat with a different crew than I had raced with for the past 19 seasons. After all of that time, and with the bond that formed between all of us, I really missed racing with the same skipper and crew that I had raced with first on Bonnie's J-22 then her J-70. But I liked learning the new boat and ended up doing a lot of coaching and some rethinking some of the deck hardware set up on the boat which I enjoyed. The skipper and crew were all really nice folks, and so it was fun racing them. Plus the finish places improved greatly over the course of the summer which is how it should be. Clearly I enjoyed my time sailing aboard Starbird. (picture below)

Jeff Sailing by jeff_halp, on Flickr


But I hardly did any sailing on Synergy after May. My father was at the end of his life and so I was spending time visiting with him in Florida whenever I could. He passed on in September, so sailing took a back seat to mourning and trying to keep up at the office. I did find that occasional low key daysailing was at least palliative for me.

Later during the fall, I did the frostbite series on the same boat that I crewed on this summer. Over the fall frostbite season, we were able to continue to become more consistently competitive and improved on crew work and figuring out how to get the most out of the boat.

I am guardedly optimistic that 2020 will be a better sailing year than 2019. I plan to do more of the CHESSS Class races, probably single-handed, and continue racing on board Starbird. I would like to do more cruising and perhaps get away for a several week long cruise down to the southern end of the Bay.

That's about it....except

Happy New Year everyone, welcome to the roaring 20's....

Jeff
Great picture Jeff,

Hope to see Synergy going out Whitehall Bat or even flying by us this coming season. If not we’ll continue to anchor off your house.😀
 

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I made the opposite move in the fall, Flag Harbor to Deale. Deale is between home and work so it's a lot easier to do the odd boat chore now and then.

I had an unpleasant surprise when Herrington Harbor wouldn't take my boat on the hard for the winter, because it's "too old" (1978, decision made sight unseen). I guess they are focused on the rich-people-boat market. I found another nearby yard willing to suffer my presence.
That’s a first. I’ve seen older boats in there on the hard. Certainly they have a real cross section. They must have some bad experiences . But to get that kind of reputation forwarded in the boating community would not be good for them. Especially to do it sight unseen

I know a few of the managers there and may mention this to them ( some of them are SN followers) with your permission of course ( not using your name )
 

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I know a few of the managers there and may mention this to them ( some of them are SN followers) with your permission of course ( not using your name )
I called a couple times to ask about availability, rates, scheduling, etc. I moved the boat from a less expensive area specifically because of the services available at Herrington Harbor. Then I filled out a haulout order online, and I got a call from a person who asked me what year the boat was. When I said 1978, she said, "OK, we're going to decline." I asked why, and she told me about the problem of abandoned boats. I told her that I absolutely understand that concern, but assured her that this was my favorite hobby, and that I sail and maintain my boat, and that I had moved it to the area expecting to work extensively on it at Herrington Harbor North. I asked if they could send someone over to take a look (my boat is not a museum piece but it's clearly not a derelict either). They did, and politely declined again. So I found another yard nearby.

When it was all done I wondered if I should have offered a substantial deposit to be refunded on re-launch, or some other risk mitigation for them. But anyway, I will not be spending any money there for my projects, except for the occasional trip to West Marine. In particular, their resident canvas and sail shops probably lost some business.

I don't mind at all if you share this with them. I certainly understand their issue with abandoned boats, but I think there are more nuanced ways to deal with that than turning away a customer based on the year of manufacture of their boat.
 

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I called a couple times to ask about availability, rates, scheduling, etc. I moved the boat from a less expensive area specifically because of the services available at Herrington Harbor. Then I filled out a haulout order online, and I got a call from a person who asked me what year the boat was. When I said 1978, she said, "OK, we're going to decline." I asked why, and she told me about the problem of abandoned boats. I told her that I absolutely understand that concern, but assured her that this was my favorite hobby, and that I sail and maintain my boat, and that I had moved it to the area expecting to work extensively on it at Herrington Harbor North. I asked if they could send someone over to take a look (my boat is not a museum piece but it's clearly not a derelict either). They did, and politely declined again. So I found another yard nearby.

When it was all done I wondered if I should have offered a substantial deposit to be refunded on re-launch, or some other risk mitigation for them. But anyway, I will not be spending any money there for my projects, except for the occasional trip to West Marine. In particular, their resident canvas and sail shops probably lost some business.

I don't mind at all if you share this with them. I certainly understand their issue with abandoned boats, but I think there are more nuanced ways to deal with that than turning away a customer based on the year of manufacture of their boat.
Wow. Just wow.

I've heard some good and bad things about HH. I bought my boat on the hard there (Traceys Landing location), and they were perfectly cooperative (though pricey) during the week that we went from contract to launch to closing to departure. But things can change over time.

I can see how abandoned boats can be a real problem, but there are much better ways to mitigate that risk. HH must be pretty "fat, dumb, and happy" if they can just turn away business like that without even considering alternative ways to mitigate the risk. The marketplace has a way of punishing that kind of arrogance.
 

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Daniel - Norsea 27
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I made the opposite move in the fall, Flag Harbor to Deale. Deale is between home and work so it's a lot easier to do the odd boat chore now and then.

I had an unpleasant surprise when Herrington Harbor wouldn't take my boat on the hard for the winter, because it's "too old" (1978, decision made sight unseen). I guess they are focused on the rich-people-boat market. I found another nearby yard willing to suffer my presence.

That's too bad. HH folks now own Shipwright and now Rockhold Creek Marina (where my boat was at). RCM is being managed by Galahad Marine out of Northeast, MD. They're only interested in new center-console power boats. They gave a 2 month notice (to some people) they were no longer allowing DIY, liveaboards, and later said they didn't want old boats either (on the hard OR in the water). They're trying to get rid of the two or three liveaboards left, but they can't go anywhere either because of boats being too old, short, whatever and one guy can't afford a deposit at another place. Galahad operations have been a bit sketchy to me during the changes. They've gone through 4 "managers" in the past year, and a couple times failed to pay their bills causing trash to pile up at the dumpster for weeks at a time.

I'm surprised HHN turned you away. I had thought to go next door to Bay Harbor but I personally couldn't get ahold of management, by phone or in person although a few people seemed to be lucky enough because they moved right there. Flag Harbor is much farther away (85 mile drive) but costs less overall. Not visiting too often right now as we're expecting little ones and wife is needing more help. Otherwise I only get to the boat once a week working on what I can to get it ready.

Tucked away at Flag Harbor.
 

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That's too bad. HH folks now own Shipwright and now Rockhold Creek Marina (where my boat was at). RCM is being managed by Galahad Marine out of Northeast, MD.
Unfortunately, it appears that one large operator is trying to obtain a monopoly on that whole bay. There are very few sailboat-accessible yards left on that creek, and as you noted the newly acquired ones have changed their policy on what work can be done on boats (ie, none). One of my alternatives to HHN was looking pretty attractive, until I was informed that I would not be able to work on the boat while on the hard, other than cleaning and waxing.
 

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Daniel - Norsea 27
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Unfortunately, it appears that one large operator is trying to obtain a monopoly on that whole bay. There are very few sailboat-accessible yards left on that creek, and as you noted the newly acquired ones have changed their policy on what work can be done on boats (ie, none). One of my alternatives to HHN was looking pretty attractive, until I was informed that I would not be able to work on the boat while on the hard, other than cleaning and waxing.
yeah, I believe there's a couple people trying to buy up properties. I was told one of them got some land nearby that's supposed to be used to build a hotel in the near future. Plus, as they get that monopoly, as you say... they can raise prices on everyone who have fewer options on where to put their boats.
 

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yeah, I believe there's a couple people trying to buy up properties. I was told one of them got some land nearby that's supposed to be used to build a hotel in the near future. Plus, as they get that monopoly, as you say... they can raise prices on everyone who have fewer options on where to put their boats.
My grandparents lived on the water in Deale. Good luck to anyone who wants to build a hotel around there - the environmental restrictions are huge.

I suspect that the vast majority of monopoly attempts in the marine industry collapse under their own debt load. I'm not sure I'd be wanting to snatch up properties as we're nearing the end of a boom cycle. Unfortunately, either way it will push up slip fees. A successful monopoly will stifle competition, and a failed attempt at monopoly will cause a bunch of marinas to shut their doors and force up prices by lowering supply. Either way consumers lose in the short run, but prices return to equilibrium in the long run.

We'll see what happens.
 

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Does anyone know of a good small outboard repair shop in the Baltimore area? I've got an old Johnson 2hp for the dink that needs to be serviced. Thanks in advance.
 

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For that matter, does anyone know where to buy a used dinghy outboard? I need something in the 2-3hp range for a Walker Bay 8. Craigslist isn't turning up anything.
 

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Does anyone know of a good small outboard repair shop in the Baltimore area? I've got an old Johnson 2hp for the dink that needs to be serviced. Thanks in advance.
I'll keep my fingers crossed that you get some good responses but this comes up every couple of years and unfortunately so far there's never been a lasting definitive answer. Shops where some members have had luck have been disasters for others. A couple of shops where members had runs of good luck went out of business or changed hands. I guess if you're a smart and skilled mechanic you have bigger fish to fry. For better or worse, small outboards have become a throwaway item. A few hours at a shop's hourly rate plus parts might put you 1/3 to 1/2 into the price of a new small motor. People who don't want to throw away end up going the DIY route.

For that matter, does anyone know where to buy a used dinghy outboard? I need something in the 2-3hp range for a Walker Bay 8. Craigslist isn't turning up anything.
Not a lot are being bought or sold this time of year. You'll see more pop up in the spring. For the reasons mentioned above, a well maintained, running, used small outboard will be a bit of a unicorn. Word of mouth at your marina will produce results if you tell enough people what you're looking for. I found a good used motor by mentioning in passing to a dock mate while at a transient marina that I was in market.
 

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Asking around the marina for tips on who does good service work is a good idea, or even better, see if there’s someone around who is handy with outboards and is willing to show you how to do the service yourself. It’s not rocket surgery.

Ok, can’t resist.... Everybody should know how to service their Johnson, or have a friend who will, right? :)
 
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