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Those Sewards are solid boats, hopefully you'll have great weather this weekend (and all season) but if it does get crappy the boat will stand a lot more weather than most people are willing to endure.
 

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Those Sewards are solid boats, hopefully you'll have great weather this weekend (and all season) but if it does get crappy the boat will stand a lot more weather than most people are willing to endure.
Thanks. I've never challenged the boat much, but seems sturdy so far.. I couldn't remember, but see the S23 actually has almost twice the ballast of a catalina 22. And I've seen people take those out if pretty spirited conditions :D (it's the lightning that gives me pause..) I have a single line reefing for the main, and few different hank-on headsails so can just start careful.
 

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We're tending to other family needs this weekend while awaiting parts to fix our macerator (story below). As inland sailors, we've never used the macerator before, but that doesn't mean it can't spring a leak at the most inopportune time. :mad:

Last weekend we had a wonderful time off Ship Point on the Corsica River on Saturday night, then on Sunday mid-day (my birthday) we motored over to Cacaway Island. If we had waited until evening we could have sailed, since the winds picked up nicely. But we had a very nice time anchored in the fresh breeze. We dinghied over to Lankford Bay marina to check out their store (which unfortunately had closed at noon). Upon returning to the boat, we discovered a very unpleasant smell, and inspecting the bilge and tracing the source made it clear that we had unpleasant stuff coming out of our macerator. Fortunately, we've always made "strategic stops" on land and haven't done #2 in our head for YEARS. So it was only dilute pee. Hand-turning one of the cap nuts revealed that the brass stud holding the macerator to the pump section had corroded and broken loose, allowing stuff to leak through the gasket.

136044


136043


I pulled out the manual's schematic and showed it to Lori and explained what had happened, then said, "Well, since it's my birthday maybe you can handle this for me." ;) That clearly was a no-go, so I quickly dried it off and duct-taped around the gasket seam to slow the leakage, and made use of a number of absorbent pads and old quart salad containers (which we always keep handy for emergencies like this) to contain the slow leakage for the evening. With the head out of commissions, we went to shore the next morning to take care of our needs.

We returned to Rock Hall earlier than planned on Monday to allow time to pump out and disassemble everything and disinfect so we wouldn't be returning to a stinky boat next time. I immediately ordered a service kit off Amazon which my manual said would include the required new brass studs. Disassembling everything was not as bad as expected, because everything inside was pristine due to lack of use. The previous owner had replaced the macerator just before we bought the boat, and we never used it because we only pee and always pump out. My greatest fear was that there might be PO's "solids" in the dead volume that the pumpout doesn't reach, but everything that came out was clear. The macerator blade and pump impeller were pristine. All we really need from the service kit was the new studs and fresh gaskets. I made use of my wood emergency plugs to seal everything up, disinfected everything, and left for home to await the service kit.

The next day I spoke to Jabsco and discovered that the service kit would NOT include the brass studs because Jabsco has "upgraded" to four stainless steel bolts in 2015, but they make you buy them separately ($15!). I told them I was shocked and disappointed that they downgraded their service kit (no longer including the brass studs or bolts) without changing the part number of the service kit. If I hadn't called I would have waited a week for the service kit and gotten something that wouldn't fix my problem. I ordered the bolts the next day, and am waiting for them to come now, so no sailing this weekend because my wife doesn't want to use the boat until it's fixed. I'm tempted to return the service kit and re-use the existing parts, but even with a pristine-looking impeller that has never been used, it is 6 years old and this is a job I don't want to do again. So the new parts will go in even though I might not really need them.

If you have a Jabsco 18590 series macerator, you should take note of these design changes, since the brass studs are known to be problematic for corrosion and breakage. If you have cap nuts and brass studs on it currently (instead of newer SS hex head bolts), I'd strongly advise buying the stainless steel bolt kit (17288-1000) and replacing them one at a time (which does not require disassembly). I did look at Fastenal, and it is possible to instead purchase less expensive #10-32 x 4" long bolts and custom cut them, but you'll have Phillips head instead of the nicer hex head bolts.
 

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Thanks. I've never challenged the boat much, but seems sturdy so far.. I couldn't remember, but see the S23 actually has almost twice the ballast of a catalina 22. And I've seen people take those out if pretty spirited conditions :D (it's the lightning that gives me pause..) I have a single line reefing for the main, and few different hank-on headsails so can just start careful.
Sewards are great boats. Big long dagger board, right?

From a design perspective, I suspect that the reason for the Seaward's much larger ballast is because it's not as deep as a lead keel would be. When the ballast is less deep, you need more of it to counteract the pressure on the sails. Someone correct me if I'm wrong about that.
 

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Haleakulas heart stopped beating on the last day of our 17 day trip. 36 year old Yanmar with 12,347 hours.
I guess I feel I got my money’s worth. We average 2500 nm per year and she was used.

I am not repowering with new as spending $18,000 on a new Beta or $16,000 on a new Yanmar doesn’t make sense as we will probably be out of boating in 5-7 years.

Looking for a rebuilt Yanmar 3GM30 or 3YM30 to fit exactly in place so I don’t have to make to many adjustments. I have a couple good installers but would take advice on any anyone has used or knows.
Also if anyone has a line on these two engines let me know.

I have two possibly lined up, but they get shipped from far away. Just an FYI still will cost $8-$12,000 for a heRt transplant. Labor is 40-50 hours alone with a simple removal and install.

I’ll probably be out of commission till mid August at least but may miss the heat of summer.
I went through the repowering nightmare, I mean process a few years ago. My Yanmar "only" had about 2500 hours on it but had been severely (about 50%) overpropped for several years by prior owner and had suffered a salt water leak from a loose hose clamp that caused some rust on one area, so I had it shipped to Mack Boring for a complete rebuild (they call it remanufacture) and it cost about 10K. BUT....the actual labor cost at Delaware City Marina went well over the estimate for just the engine removal and reinstall, and while the engine was out I figured I might as well replace those old exhaust hoses and while I had such good access to the bilge I should probably replace the bilge pump hoses and one of the float switches. While the exhaust hoses were removed we noticed the hull fitting was corroded stainless and while it was working OK it was "chinese stainless" and was developing pinholes so I replaced that. Also, noticed raw water strainer was also looking pretty tired so replaced that with a larger one. Long story short, everything I did was stuff that i felt needed to be done but it about doubled the original cost estimate. No regrets because I plan to keep this boat for awhile and avoid future problems but my overall cost, including additional things I had done and the additional labor charge for the engine removal and reinstall above the estimate was about twice what the original estimate was. Then, to add insult to injury, I was hit with yet another $4000 bill the day I was to depart which was ridiculous because I had been paying up front for each additional item and the labor and a few days earlier had been told they were still a little underbudget. But I didn't want to get involved in a court case in a State where I didn't live and I wanted to use my boat that season, so I paid the extra $4000 and left, never to return. They tried to sell me a new genset fuel pump because when they reinstalled the genset it would crank but not start. I was so disgusted with them at that point that I told them I'd have it fixed at my destination. The next day, while down near Cape May, I did a little poking around and discovered that I didn't actually need a new fuel pump, they had just forgotten to open the valve that supplies the genset with fuel. Then, I had an overheating problem that got progressively worse and eventually learned that they (only ones besides me who had access to engine and I hadn't added any coolant) added 2 different types of coolant, which causes it to turn to mud and clogs up everything so I had to get that all flushed out and refilled with new coolant. Eventually I got all their errors straightened out but I do hope you have better luck with your repower than I did, both with the quality of workmanship AND keeping costs under control.
 

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We're tending to other family needs this weekend while awaiting parts to fix our macerator (story below). As inland sailors, we've never used the macerator before, but that doesn't mean it can't spring a leak at the most inopportune time. :mad:

Last weekend we had a wonderful time off Ship Point on the Corsica River on Saturday night, then on Sunday mid-day (my birthday) we motored over to Cacaway Island. If we had waited until evening we could have sailed, since the winds picked up nicely. But we had a very nice time anchored in the fresh breeze. We dinghied over to Lankford Bay marina to check out their store (which unfortunately had closed at noon). Upon returning to the boat, we discovered a very unpleasant smell, and inspecting the bilge and tracing the source made it clear that we had unpleasant stuff coming out of our macerator. Fortunately, we've always made "strategic stops" on land and haven't done #2 in our head for YEARS. So it was only dilute pee. Hand-turning one of the cap nuts revealed that the brass stud holding the macerator to the pump section had corroded and broken loose, allowing stuff to leak through the gasket.

View attachment 136044

View attachment 136043

I pulled out the manual's schematic and showed it to Lori and explained what had happened, then said, "Well, since it's my birthday maybe you can handle this for me." ;) That clearly was a no-go, so I quickly dried it off and duct-taped around the gasket seam to slow the leakage, and made use of a number of absorbent pads and old quart salad containers (which we always keep handy for emergencies like this) to contain the slow leakage for the evening. With the head out of commissions, we went to shore the next morning to take care of our needs.

We returned to Rock Hall earlier than planned on Monday to allow time to pump out and disassemble everything and disinfect so we wouldn't be returning to a stinky boat next time. I immediately ordered a service kit off Amazon which my manual said would include the required new brass studs. Disassembling everything was not as bad as expected, because everything inside was pristine due to lack of use. The previous owner had replaced the macerator just before we bought the boat, and we never used it because we only pee and always pump out. My greatest fear was that there might be PO's "solids" in the dead volume that the pumpout doesn't reach, but everything that came out was clear. The macerator blade and pump impeller were pristine. All we really need from the service kit was the new studs and fresh gaskets. I made use of my wood emergency plugs to seal everything up, disinfected everything, and left for home to await the service kit.

The next day I spoke to Jabsco and discovered that the service kit would NOT include the brass studs because Jabsco has "upgraded" to four stainless steel bolts in 2015, but they make you buy them separately ($15!). I told them I was shocked and disappointed that they downgraded their service kit (no longer including the brass studs or bolts) without changing the part number of the service kit. If I hadn't called I would have waited a week for the service kit and gotten something that wouldn't fix my problem. I ordered the bolts the next day, and am waiting for them to come now, so no sailing this weekend because my wife doesn't want to use the boat until it's fixed. I'm tempted to return the service kit and re-use the existing parts, but even with a pristine-looking impeller that has never been used, it is 6 years old and this is a job I don't want to do again. So the new parts will go in even though I might not really need them.

If you have a Jabsco 18590 series macerator, you should take note of these design changes, since the brass studs are known to be problematic for corrosion and breakage. If you have cap nuts and brass studs on it currently (instead of newer SS hex head bolts), I'd strongly advise buying the stainless steel bolt kit (17288-1000) and replacing them one at a time (which does not require disassembly). I did look at Fastenal, and it is possible to instead purchase less expensive #10-32 x 4" long bolts and custom cut them, but you'll have Phillips head instead of the nicer hex head bolts.
I just hate those pumps and have had those long bolts fail too. Also have had them leak and had one seize up after only a few months use. They also make an awful noise and use lots of amps. Mine was used to empty holding tank and I replaced it with a Gulper pump made for pumping waste and it's worked just fine for 3 years. It's quieter and uses less amps and is self priming and has required no maintenance. Apparently by the time waste gets mashed up by your marine head and piped into your holding tank, it's already in such fine particles that's pretty much a liquid so you don't really need a macerator pump. I'll never own another one!
 

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Sewards are great boats. Big long dagger board, right?

From a design perspective, I suspect that the reason for the Seaward's much larger ballast is because it's not as deep as a lead keel would be. When the ballast is less deep, you need more of it to counteract the pressure on the sails. Someone correct me if I'm wrong about that.
That's the newer ones. Mine is an 1989. A shoel keel type, has a tiny wing on it. Draw just over 2 ft. Probably annoying to trailer, but I keep it in a marina.

Sent from my Pixel 3a using Tapatalk
 

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Anyone have any recent info on Tangier? I had been under the impression that visitors may not be welcome because of the virus. Now that Virginia's moved into phase 2 have they changed their attitude?
 

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Well, report from saturday 6/20. Encountered massive downpour/lighting on the way to the boat, and still more cells moving around on the weather radar. And almost no wind otherwise, so just motored around on the river with my 5 year old crew checking out some anchorage spots, then tried anchoring for the first time with my boat. Went as expected; I didn't let out enough the first two times, but third time it stuck. My depth sounder doesn't work, and I have no idea what length the marks on my chain are, so involve some guesswork.. After frantically staring at the anchor app for a while we grilled some hotdogs, ate inside as rain started, with rolling thunder overhead the whole time. Powerboats were anchoring next to me, but I didn't like being the tallest metal object around so headed to the marina to hang out next to people with bigger masts.. Docked singlehanded (23 ft and outboard = stupid easy) during the downpour, which of course stopped 5 min after I tied up. So in about 3 hours we had calm, strong wind, rain, thunder & lightning, baking sun and pouring sweat. Top notch day on the Chesapeake! (y)😁
 

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We're tending to other family needs this weekend while awaiting parts to fix our macerator (story below). As inland sailors, we've never used the macerator before, but that doesn't mean it can't spring a leak at the most inopportune time. :mad:

Last weekend we had a wonderful time off Ship Point on the Corsica River on Saturday night, then on Sunday mid-day (my birthday) we motored over to Cacaway Island. If we had waited until evening we could have sailed, since the winds picked up nicely. But we had a very nice time anchored in the fresh breeze. We dinghied over to Lankford Bay marina to check out their store (which unfortunately had closed at noon). Upon returning to the boat, we discovered a very unpleasant smell, and inspecting the bilge and tracing the source made it clear that we had unpleasant stuff coming out of our macerator. Fortunately, we've always made "strategic stops" on land and haven't done #2 in our head for YEARS. So it was only dilute pee. Hand-turning one of the cap nuts revealed that the brass stud holding the macerator to the pump section had corroded and broken loose, allowing stuff to leak through the gasket.

View attachment 136044

View attachment 136043

I pulled out the manual's schematic and showed it to Lori and explained what had happened, then said, "Well, since it's my birthday maybe you can handle this for me." ;) That clearly was a no-go, so I quickly dried it off and duct-taped around the gasket seam to slow the leakage, and made use of a number of absorbent pads and old quart salad containers (which we always keep handy for emergencies like this) to contain the slow leakage for the evening. With the head out of commissions, we went to shore the next morning to take care of our needs.

We returned to Rock Hall earlier than planned on Monday to allow time to pump out and disassemble everything and disinfect so we wouldn't be returning to a stinky boat next time. I immediately ordered a service kit off Amazon which my manual said would include the required new brass studs. Disassembling everything was not as bad as expected, because everything inside was pristine due to lack of use. The previous owner had replaced the macerator just before we bought the boat, and we never used it because we only pee and always pump out. My greatest fear was that there might be PO's "solids" in the dead volume that the pumpout doesn't reach, but everything that came out was clear. The macerator blade and pump impeller were pristine. All we really need from the service kit was the new studs and fresh gaskets. I made use of my wood emergency plugs to seal everything up, disinfected everything, and left for home to await the service kit.

The next day I spoke to Jabsco and discovered that the service kit would NOT include the brass studs because Jabsco has "upgraded" to four stainless steel bolts in 2015, but they make you buy them separately ($15!). I told them I was shocked and disappointed that they downgraded their service kit (no longer including the brass studs or bolts) without changing the part number of the service kit. If I hadn't called I would have waited a week for the service kit and gotten something that wouldn't fix my problem. I ordered the bolts the next day, and am waiting for them to come now, so no sailing this weekend because my wife doesn't want to use the boat until it's fixed. I'm tempted to return the service kit and re-use the existing parts, but even with a pristine-looking impeller that has never been used, it is 6 years old and this is a job I don't want to do again. So the new parts will go in even though I might not really need them.

If you have a Jabsco 18590 series macerator, you should take note of these design changes, since the brass studs are known to be problematic for corrosion and breakage. If you have cap nuts and brass studs on it currently (instead of newer SS hex head bolts), I'd strongly advise buying the stainless steel bolt kit (17288-1000) and replacing them one at a time (which does not require disassembly). I did look at Fastenal, and it is possible to instead purchase less expensive #10-32 x 4" long bolts and custom cut them, but you'll have Phillips head instead of the nicer hex head bolts.
We do use our macerator on our trips offshore. In fact ours gasket and bolts disintegrated a few years ago. I found it easy to replace the unit , because we did use it and it was not pristine like yours.
The newest one has SS bolts.
 

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Well, report from saturday 6/20. Encountered massive downpour/lighting on the way to the boat, and still more cells moving around on the weather radar. And almost no wind otherwise, so just motored around on the river with my 5 year old crew checking out some anchorage spots, then tried anchoring for the first time with my boat. Went as expected; I didn't let out enough the first two times, but third time it stuck. My depth sounder doesn't work, and I have no idea what length the marks on my chain are, so involve some guesswork.. After frantically staring at the anchor app for a while we grilled some hotdogs, ate inside as rain started, with rolling thunder overhead the whole time. Powerboats were anchoring next to me, but I didn't like being the tallest metal object around so headed to the marina to hang out next to people with bigger masts.. Docked singlehanded (23 ft and outboard = stupid easy) during the downpour, which of course stopped 5 min after I tied up. So in about 3 hours we had calm, strong wind, rain, thunder & lightning, baking sun and pouring sweat. Top notch day on the Chesapeake! (y)😁
Docking at a marina where you aren’t the tallest mast does not insure you not getting hit.

10 years ago we took a mooring ball in Back Creek next to Jabins. We were surrounded by over 600 masts.
We took a lightening strike which hit the water tower, and entered the boat from the prop and exited out the top of the mast. Jumped over to a Catalina 42 marred next to us and blew two of its thru hulls out . We lost chart plotter, radar and fused the Yanmar engine panel. ( everything was powered off and our boat is bonded with a Dynaplate) . Insurance got us a new chart plotter and digital radar

Lightening is a thing which happens on the Chessie frequently. Best policy is just not be out in the open sailing.
 

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I went through the repowering nightmare, I mean process a few years ago. My Yanmar "only" had about 2500 hours on it but had been severely (about 50%) overpropped for several years by prior owner and had suffered a salt water leak from a loose hose clamp that caused some rust on one area, so I had it shipped to Mack Boring for a complete rebuild (they call it remanufacture) and it cost about 10K. BUT....the actual labor cost at Delaware City Marina went well over the estimate for just the engine removal and reinstall, and while the engine was out I figured I might as well replace those old exhaust hoses and while I had such good access to the bilge I should probably replace the bilge pump hoses and one of the float switches. While the exhaust hoses were removed we noticed the hull fitting was corroded stainless and while it was working OK it was "chinese stainless" and was developing pinholes so I replaced that. Also, noticed raw water strainer was also looking pretty tired so replaced that with a larger one. Long story short, everything I did was stuff that i felt needed to be done but it about doubled the original cost estimate. No regrets because I plan to keep this boat for awhile and avoid future problems but my overall cost, including additional things I had done and the additional labor charge for the engine removal and reinstall above the estimate was about twice what the original estimate was. Then, to add insult to injury, I was hit with yet another $4000 bill the day I was to depart which was ridiculous because I had been paying up front for each additional item and the labor and a few days earlier had been told they were still a little underbudget. But I didn't want to get involved in a court case in a State where I didn't live and I wanted to use my boat that season, so I paid the extra $4000 and left, never to return. They tried to sell me a new genset fuel pump because when they reinstalled the genset it would crank but not start. I was so disgusted with them at that point that I told them I'd have it fixed at my destination. The next day, while down near Cape May, I did a little poking around and discovered that I didn't actually need a new fuel pump, they had just forgotten to open the valve that supplies the genset with fuel. Then, I had an overheating problem that got progressively worse and eventually learned that they (only ones besides me who had access to engine and I hadn't added any coolant) added 2 different types of coolant, which causes it to turn to mud and clogs up everything so I had to get that all flushed out and refilled with new coolant. Eventually I got all their errors straightened out but I do hope you have better luck with your repower than I did, both with the quality of workmanship AND keeping costs under control.
Thanks
That marina has a not so good rep.
Our mechanic is one used by a number of other sailors here on SN with good reviews.
I have confidence in it, but time will tell.

I am replacing the fuel tank though. 36 years is enough😀.
 

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Well, report from saturday 6/20. Encountered massive downpour/lighting on the way to the boat........ So in about 3 hours we had calm, strong wind, rain, thunder & lightning, baking sun and pouring sweat. Top notch day on the Chesapeake! (y)😁
Great news that you had a good time despite the weather! Once in a great while sitting dry in the cabin as it howls above is a fine experience, and good for a small kid to realize sailing isn't just for sunny days. Hope your small guy has a copy of The Sailor Dog or some other good book to curl up with in a storm.
Now to get the depthsounder working and mark the chain, better to have faith in your ground tackle than trust an alarm that will only tell you you have a problem after it occurs. That said, I now use an alarm when anchored overnight, but it took a while to get it tuned in...a false alarm because you moved the phone from bow to stern may still scare the hell out of you.
 

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Great news that you had a good time despite the weather! Once in a great while sitting dry in the cabin as it howls above is a fine experience, and good for a small kid to realize sailing isn't just for sunny days. Hope your small guy has a copy of The Sailor Dog or some other good book to curl up with in a storm.
Now to get the depthsounder working and mark the chain, better to have faith in your ground tackle than trust an alarm that will only tell you you have a problem after it occurs. That said, I now use an alarm when anchored overnight, but it took a while to get it tuned in...a false alarm because you moved the phone from bow to stern may still scare the hell out of you.
Yes was a nice relaxing day regardless. Fixing the instruments is priority, but unfortunately proving a PIA. I have some wire tracing to do, but they also look super old so could just be busted too. Might just have to pull boat out of the water and install new ones, lol.

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Yes was a nice relaxing day regardless. Fixing the instruments is priority, but unfortunately proving a PIA. I have some wire tracing to do, but they also look super old so could just be busted too.
A working depth finder is your single most important gauge (aside from compass). My depth finder became temporarily unreliable a couple years ago (apparently due to some delaminating antifouling paint). Rather than haul the boat, I bought this handheld as a backup. I covered the bottom of the sensor with butyl tape, plopped it down on the inside of the hull in the aft berth, and routed the wire out the escape hatch to the c0ckpit. Worked like a charm, and got me through until I resolved the probem (by hard scrubbing the boat's through-hull transducer in the water). For about $115, it's good insurance. I'd sell you mine if you're interested (packed in original box) - will be near Annapolis sometime between tomorrow and Friday if you're interested - let me know:


136074

136075
 

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A working depth finder is your single most important gauge (aside from compass). My depth finder became temporarily unreliable a couple years ago (apparently due to some delaminating antifouling paint). Rather than haul the boat, I bought this handheld as a backup. I covered the bottom of the sensor with butyl tape, plopped it down on the inside of the hull in the aft berth, and routed the wire out the escape hatch to the c0ckpit. Worked like a charm, and got me through until I resolved the probem (by hard scrubbing the boat's through-hull transducer in the water). For about $115, it's good insurance. I'd sell your mine if you're interested (packed in original box) - will be near Annapolis sometime between tomorrow and Friday if you're interested - let me know:


is you portable one actually picking up fish? Is it that sensitive/ reliable?


View attachment 136074
View attachment 136075
 
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