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Started a Purasan install thread here.

 

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I never thought of that but are you sure about that? Do you have a source for that statement?
Some of the NDZ applications have language about watermen either not having toilets at all or not having MSDs. Reading between the lines, one gets the sense that there's sort of a don't ask don't tell policy around waste treatment on watermen's boats. And maybe that's OK as watermen have mainly day-use boats and recreational boats far outnumber them at this point anyway.

Really, I'm just trying to think about the entirety of the fleet of boats in the Chesapeake and policies that might be sensible to improve waste discharge compliance without resorting to draconian enforcement approaches.
 

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Some of the NDZ applications have language about watermen either not having toilets at all or not having MSDs. Reading between the lines, one gets the sense that there's sort of a don't ask don't tell policy around waste treatment on watermen's boats. And maybe that's OK as watermen have mainly day-use boats and recreational boats far outnumber them at this point anyway.

Really, I'm just trying to think about the entirety of the fleet of boats in the Chesapeake and policies that might be sensible to improve waste discharge compliance without resorting to draconian enforcement approaches.
There are surely many more recreational boats than working watermen's boats. OTOH the latter are used MUCH more frequently (daily in season), while a large number of rec boats are marina queens that go out a few times a year.

And I wouldn't call a requirement to install (and use!) a holding tank a draconian measure. There is a watermen's boat gassing up at our marina regularly, with the pumpout right next to the gas pumps. Would take a few minutes to attach the hose.
 

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And I wouldn't call a requirement to install (and use!) a holding tank a draconian measure.
I wasn't calling the holding tank requirement draconian, but rather was alluding random law enforcement boardings to enforce pumpout rules. You'd really have to step them up quite a bit beyond what has ever been practiced on most parts of the Chesapeake to get compliance from pumpout refuser holdouts.
 

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Tartan 37
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Discussion Starter #26
Its very frustrating to me that our sewage plants overflow often with little or no penalty is the more pressing issue... Not NDZs
 

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I got an Eastport Pram kit for Christmas- wife knew I wanted to build a classic dinghy, and she got tired of relying on water taxis or the kayaks. Perfect project for this winter, since skiing is not really happening per usual.
Can't wait to tow her behind , and just sail her around too!
 

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Ahhh... I'm glad to see this thread started. It makes it feel like the season might be getting here sooner than later. Happy to see some folks are out there sailing!

⛵⛵⛵
 

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The NDZ for raw sewage from recreational vessels in Chesapeake Bay is pretty much a joke. Many years ago, when it was first proposed, I researched and published an extensive feature story in several publications that I wrote for at the time. Keep in mind that the Susquehanna River alone has more than 100 sewage treatment plants, many of which have been out of compliance for decades, and they all flow into the head of Chesapeake Bay. Some, here in Maryland's small towns, have a long, concrete trough that has a series of paddles that rock ground, raw sewage back and forth and then discharge it into a nearby creek. Yep, that's called processing, and they figure the sun's ultraviolet rays kill the bugs - yeah, right. Well what happens on the cloudy days? Broken sewage lines are everywhere and hundreds of them take place every year, but this does not have to be reported unless the spill is more than 10,000 gallons. Yep, it was in the bill.

At the time, there were approximately 100,000 recreational boats registered in Maryland, most of which made about a dozen trips each year. The volume of raw sewage discharged from these vessels was no where near what the waterfowl discharge amounted to during the migratory waterfowl season, September through March. During my research, I contacted the chief waterfowl biologist at Maryland DNR and asked how much poop does a Canada goose produce on a daily basis. He said it was an average of about 3 pounds per bird. To put things in perspective, the entire Baltimore metropolitan area, including much of Baltimore and Anne Arrundel County, gets is drinking water from Loch Raven and Liberty reservoirs. Year round goose population at Loch Raven is estimated at 5,000 non-migratory, giant Canada geese, each of which poops in the reservoir. This amounts to 15,000 pounds of raw, untreated sewage a day being dumped in the city's main water supply. UGH! The same stats are valid for Liberty and Prettyboy reservoirs. Now you know why those drinking waters smell like a heavily treated swimming pool. It takes a lot of chlorine to neutralize that much fecal chloroform bacteria.

At the head of the Gunpowder River, there was a broken sewage main that leaked about 1,000 gallons of raw sewage a day into the river at the time the article was published. The state counteracted this by parking a large tank truck there filled with concentrated liquid chlorine and dribbled it into the river just downstream of the leak. This continued for years until the break was eventually repaired and part of the pipe replaced.

There are hundreds of instances such as the ones listed above that continue to take place to this very day. The treatment plants constant beg for more money to update and upgrade the plants, but the legislators seem to ignore their requests. Some of the plants, mainly the smaller ones, are often in compliance, but all of the recreational boats combined discharge in a single year, would not amount to more than a fraction of what a small, individual treatment plant that is out of compliance dumps in the bay during a single month.

From my perspective, sailboats, even live aboards, contribution to the fecal chloroform level in Chesapeake Bay doesn't amount to a pimple on an elephants ass. During my travels up and down the bay, over a period of more than 60 years, it has consistently become more and more polluted, yet I see far fewer boats out on the bay over the years. Back in the 1960s, when striped bass fishing was incredible at the Dumping Grounds, located along the western shore of Kent Island, most weekends experienced 1,500 boats grinding soft shelled clams and chumming for striped bass between the Bay Bridge and Love Point. Everyone caught lots of fish, the species was not being depleted by commercial overfishing and you could clearly see to a depth of 10 feet, even during the summer months. Today, on a good day, you can enjoy underwater visibility of a couple inches at best. In fact, during the early 1960s, when I first got out of the US Navy, I was scuba diving for oyster among the old bay bridge pilings and could easily catch a bushel in 30 minutes during October and November. The underwater visibility that time of year averaged 20 to 30 feet most days. You could swim on the surface with a snorkeling outfit and see thousands of small sand mounds on the bottom where the soft shelled clams were lurking just beneath them.

Things really went downhill in that area when Kent Island decided to install a sewage treatment plant and do away with septic systems. The primary treatment of sewage at the time was chlorine, and the end of the discharge pipe was a few yards above the bay bridge in 20 feet of water. Within a few months, all the oysters and clams were dead and the water began to turn brown. Amazing!

It wasn't long after that the clams and oysters were wiped out by commercial overfishing and lack of regulation on the part of DNR. Same thing soon happened to striped bass, followed by blue crab, yellow perch, shad, herring, etc...

Well, things have only become worse since I published that article, at the end of which I stated "If the good folks is Harrisburg, PA didn't flush their toilets, the city of Havre De Grace and Port Deposit would not have any drinking water." Get the picture? Recreational boaters are not the problem!

Gary :cool:
 

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Thank you Gary for your informative and level-headed perspective here.

I've often wondered when using restrooms at marinas and waterfront restaurants where the sewage is really going, especially on the eastern shore where oftentimes the toilet bowl isn't more than a handful of feet above the MHW and groundwater levels. I know there are pumping stations, but when you account for the pipes being buried at least a couple of feet, there just isn't much elevation left to get gravity flow very far.
 

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Gary's post falls in line with what my parents told me when I was growing up. They lived on Rock Creek starting in the 60's. I remember them telling me that you could easily see the bottom all time far out into the Bay. I remember going with my dad in the 70's out around where they were building the FSK bridge, where he and some friends would scuba dive down, bring up a bunch of oysters, and eat them.

A real shame, we let this happen, let our elected officials create mess after mess (Ellicot City drainage).
 

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I am 70. Dad was a clammer in Little Egg Harbor, just South of Barnegat Bay, NJ. Dad wojld often get kid duty so Mom could work. Spent a lot of time on the water.

It was clear. I loved to lay on the boat and watch the bottom go by. All kinds of stuff down there.

By the time I was 16 it had changed dramatically. Water was not clear and the whole eco system changed.

No idea what its like now.
 

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Tartan 37
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Discussion Starter #34
We're tackling those winter projects... The big one this off season is a new dodger. We've been practicing, watching excellent Sailrite videos and progressing well I think. So far we have the sides and top pretty much complete and sewn together.. The last section, the front of the dodger, will be the most difficult yet. No major mistakes so far (keeping fingers crossed). A local canvas shop has been gracious enough to put in some of the grommets when we near the end as we do not have the tool to do it properly.
138411

Side/aft panels
138412

Sewing the side to the top panel
 

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Thats super cool! Last year... or no, 2019 rather, we decided to do our own cockpit cushion covers for the vessel we ended up selling last year. It was quite a learning experience! The dodger seems like it would be tricky trying to get the measurements just right but doable. Looks like you're well on your way!
 

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Grommets are pretty easy to install, and there are kits for the installation that sell for under $10, including a dozen brass grommets. You just need a hammer and a small block of wood to put them in place.

Neat job and it really looks great,

Gary :cool:
 

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Tartan 37
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Discussion Starter #37
These are the twist and lock... I have the tool for the round ones.
 

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Really excited to get the season underway! We've moved within driving distance of the boat (hour and a half-Harrisburg PA), so I'm hopeful that will mean a lot more time to sail and more time to do the inevitable maintenance. Hope to see some of you out on the water!
 

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Really excited to get the season underway! We've moved within driving distance of the boat (hour and a half-Harrisburg PA), so I'm hopeful that will mean a lot more time to sail and more time to do the inevitable maintenance. Hope to see some of you out on the water!
Us too! Its been quite cold and rain/snow/sleet lately in the area and its making us really start to count down the days. Congrats on the move!
 

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We still have a bunch of to-dos, but making progress. First on the list is fixing delamination and rot in the anchor locker. We're going to replace the old spigot with a flush-mounted deck fitting for the anchor wash. Then refurbing the windlass. Since we bought the boat in December, we had to scramble a bit to find a slip. I underestimated how scarce they'd be around Annapolis. So, we're on the Magothy, which I think is going to work out well. Next up is bottom paint and she'll be ready to sail. Then, of course, the never-ending upgrade list. Onward!
 
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