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Twice I've tried to get to Smith Island in other people's boats and twice they've run aground. I'm wondering what is the attraction. All I've seen there is bugs.
 

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Twice I've tried to get to Smith Island in other people's boats and twice they've run aground. I'm wondering what is the attraction. All I've seen there is bugs.
Okay, that fits with the information shown on the charts on Navionics. The attraction is, that I was looking at a summer vacation rental house there, that looks like a great location, with it's on dock.
 

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Not a bad idea midwesterner!

The last few days were a little taste of some nice spring weather. We used the nice weather to get a few more things done on the boat. Hope everyone else either got out (on the water) or otherwise enjoyed the nice weather here around the Bay!
 

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It was certainly great weather! My new to me boat (purchased in January) got put back in after a two week haul for a through hull replacement, bottom job, and slight rudder repair that was identified on the survey. Got out on Sunday and it was certainly gusty.
 

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Moody 376
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question folks. I currently have a couple hundred feet of chain attached to my CQR plow anchor. so I know that all chain means I dont need as much rhode when at anchor, but at the same time, i was thinking that swapping out to twisted line. Which I also have 200 feet of. I could splice in 30' of chain. this would help with cleanup as well. Ie not as much mud sticking to the links of the chain as I bring it aboard, no washdown. and I only have a manual windlass. Thoughts?
 

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question folks. I currently have a couple hundred feet of chain attached to my CQR plow anchor. so I know that all chain means I dont need as much rhode when at anchor, but at the same time, i was thinking that swapping out to twisted line. Which I also have 200 feet of. I could splice in 30' of chain. this would help with cleanup as well. Ie not as much mud sticking to the links of the chain as I bring it aboard, no washdown. and I only have a manual windlass. Thoughts?
I don't have as much anchoring experience as some people on here, but it seems to me the more chain you have available, the more options you have for secure anchoring in deeper anchorages, and anchorages with poor holding.

You also don't mention the length and displacement of your vessel. I would agree that 200 feet of chain is probably more than you need for a 36 ft boat, but probably about right for a 60 foot one. If you reduced your chain, I would probably go with something more like 60 or 80 ft than 30.
 

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1988 Pearson 31 WK
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Chain or rope, you should still always pay out 5 to 7 times the (hi-tide water depth + height of hawse above waterline). Chain will mostly lay on the bottom and help keep the anchor itself angled properly to remain dug in.
I learned somewhere way back that a 'reasonable' chain length for smallerish boats (under 40ft?) was ~LOA, the rest 3-strand. I have 30ft 5/16 chain, then 200ft 3-strand for my 31' with a 20lb Danforth.
 

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It was certainly great weather! My new to me boat (purchased in January) got put back in after a two week haul for a through hull replacement, bottom job, and slight rudder repair that was identified on the survey. Got out on Sunday and it was certainly gusty.
Congrats on your new to you boat purchase! That's awesome! I am looking forward to getting free of the pier come the weekend if at all possible. Hoping Sunday will be nice weather, I'm not ready to sail in the just above freezing air and would like it to be at least in the 50's so that with wind and movement it isn't still feeling freezing. We missed that opening last week as we were waiting on a sail still. Arrived yesterday!
 

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question folks. I currently have a couple hundred feet of chain attached to my CQR plow anchor. so I know that all chain means I dont need as much rhode when at anchor, but at the same time, i was thinking that swapping out to twisted line. Which I also have 200 feet of. I could splice in 30' of chain. this would help with cleanup as well. Ie not as much mud sticking to the links of the chain as I bring it aboard, no washdown. and I only have a manual windlass. Thoughts?
I've found over the years that regardless of rode composition, it came up with plenty of mud each time and needed rinsing aplenty, including the anchor which sometimes seems to try to bring a bit home with me. Seems to be the nature of the beast here. If you swap to less chain, more line, in your rode then be sure to plan on laying extra length for those overnight stays. I made that mistake a couple times before realizing what I was doing wrong (different boat than we have now, we're all chain now). The wind loves to play direction swap overnight around the Bay as you may already know. Otherwise thanks to the mud and sludge composition of the Bay you should be fine. The most important thing being proper deployment of anchor and rode when you drop.

Here is a what a search Google for reference (note the metric system over imperial but the concepts are the same), I just clicked the first one to come up.
What anchor chain length is needed to keep your boat secure?
 

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Moody 376
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Well,I don't see the need of 200 ft of chain in the Chesapeake. Are you going anywhere else?
boat in question is moody 376 16000 lb disp
The PO had spent some time in the lower latitudes and had the CQR hooked to the chain, and had a spare danforth with 30' of chain hooked to the nylon rode. hopefully one day I'll venture beyond the bay...

one plus would be getting all that chain/weight out of the bow

Yeah familiar with bringing mud home from my younger days on my parents sailboat bringing water aboard via rope and bucket to splash wash the anchor. and well aware of the 5-7:1 ratio with chain being 5 and line being 7

basically, no real good compelling reason to keep the all the chain onboard, save for 30-40' of it between the anchor and nylon rode, the rest can go into storage at home.
 

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Tartan 37
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Discussion Starter #92
I would agree that 200' of chain is excessive... 50 to 100 is plenty for the Chesapeake.
 

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We just made TENTATIVE reservations in Cambridge for June and July.
Struggling to figure out our summer plans it looks unlikely we will get to Canada this year. So figured we would hang in the Chesapeake for anwhile. Cambridge looks like it will make a good base. Decent landside services, relatively inexpensive, not too far to visit the family.
 

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Unless I very rarely anchored or only dropped the hook for lunch, I'd be more comfortable having a backup anchor and rode aboard. There have been at least two times in my boating career when I had to reset an anchor in the middle of the night, and if those situations had deteriorated to the point of losing the anchor altogether, the options would have been either to find a dock to tie up to or start sailing home, neither of which would have been my preference at 3 AM.
 

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though I carried 100 feet of 1/4-inch BBB chain, I rarely used more than 50 feet anywhere in Chesapeake Bay and along the east coast in inland waters. There was one location, however, along the ICW in SC where the current was brutal and I had to put out my spare danforth along with my plow and 50 feet of chain. The Danforth dug in and the boat came to a screeching halt. I was good for the night. Next day, getting those anchors untangled and back into the boat was a real struggle. That was 12 years ago when I was still somewhat young at age 72. Sure miss those days!

Gary :cool:
 
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