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Discussion Starter #1
How many of you folks would say a 25lb Mantus anchor would be overkill on a Catalina 22, used for "adventurous" coastal cruising, in and around Florida?

I already bought the anchor, based on Mantus' sizing chart, figuring if in doubt, bigger was always better. The #25 is considered a "cruising anchor" for anything up to 30 feet/5000lbs, according to Mantus. My boat is 22' (technically 21.5') and weighs about 2700 pounds, loaded.

The anchor looks absolutely HUGE - to my inexperienced eye, at least.

Nevertheless, if I can figure a way to mount it on a bow roller, I would have no problem using it - and I'm sure no experienced sailor would ever question it! That's the rub, though: mounting it. The standard roller sold by Catalina Direct is sized for an 8lb Danforth, and I'm pretty certain it won't work. Also, there is only 9" of deck between the anchor locker and the stem, so there's not much room to mount something longer and sturdier (or so it seems, to my inexperienced eye).

So I'm left wondering if the anchor is overkill. I do notice, by the way, that Rocna recommends a paltry 13 lb anchor (model 6) for boats up to 26 feet.

Okay, I'll shut up and listen to the wise (I won't say old) salts. Thanks in advance! :)
 

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Dirt Free
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My over 1000 nights at anchor suggest there is no such thing as overkill on anchor size. The biggest anchor (with appropriate rode) that will fit and that you can handle is appropriate ..... you will sleep better.
 
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Learning the HARD way...
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... I do notice, by the way, that Rocna recommends a paltry 13 lb anchor (model 6) for boats up to 26 feet...
For a 23' vessel, Rocna recommends either a 13lb anchor if your TOTAL vessel weight (counting cargo, and passengers) is < 2 tons, or a 22lb anchor if your total weight is < 7 tons.

For "adventurous" coastal cruising, I would stick to the 1 pound per foot of boat length rule. I think that you have the right anchor.

[EDIT] - and you will be able to keep the anchor when you decide to upgrade the boat!
 

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I'll take the contrary view and say that yes it is too big, at least for your primary anchor. Certainly won't go anywhere, but not something I'd want hanging off the stem. or handling all the time.

I'd get something smaller for a primary and keep the mantus as your storm anchor or overnight anchor if you want. Nice thing about the mantus is it breaks down for storage.

FWIW, I have a 13lb on my 23' 3000lb that has always grabbed solidly in heavy winds, haven't anchored in heavy waves and don't plan too. I am planning to get a larger 22-23 lb anchor for a second anchor though so that's what I'd recommend.
 

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I have a 23' miniature trawler and carry/use a 33 pound Rocna. And my next upgrade will be to 45 pounds. All chain -- just 100' at present but that's going to change to 150' next year. 25 pounds is fine for your boat.

Seaweed weighs 7,000 fully loaded (and she always is as this is home)
Your Cat weighs far less, and has less windage. That's why in my opinion you've chosen well. Add chain though -- 1/4" G4.

Too heavy a chain will adversely effect the ability of your anchor to set properly. I was given some 5/16" chain (25') and it simply tipped over the 25 pound plow I was using at the time. The anchor would not set.
 

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For comparison purposes, I have a Catalina 28 and a 25 lb manson supreme. Our displacement is 8600 lbs. We debated on going for the next size up...but for our immediate plans involved anchoring close to our home port, there was no reason for overkill...if we were venturing farther afield, we would have gone the next size up. So far I have been extremely pleased with the 25 lb manson supreme. No regrets. Considering the difficulty I have had hauling that thing up (no windlass), and half the sea floor with it, I have so far been pleased that we went with that size.

While I agree with the other posters that larger is better...there has to be a practical limit to it...all depends on your intended purpose.
 

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It's a wee bit big for a catalina 22, but if you can make it fit, you won't need to worry about dragging it. As mentioned by someone else, you can move it to the next boat if you upsize ever.

We have a 25 lb mantus on our seaward 25 and it's a perfect fit, though almost too big for our bow roller. You'll find the mantus digs in so well that the next smaller size would have worked fine for your boat.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Guys, I can't thank you all enough for the replies!! Everything I'm hearing is pretty much what I expected, which is encouraging. I want to keep this anchor if at all possible, especially since the next smaller Mantus (or Rocna) is only 13 pounds (I wish there were one in the middle, but there ain't).

Now I need to figure out how to mount it.

The big brown truck o' joy is bringing me two anchor rollers tomorrow: the factory one for a Catalina 22, which I now believe is definitely too short and will not work, and the factory roller for Catalinas from 28-36 feet. This latter one has potential, and while it will definitely take some modification to mount it on my boat, I am optimistic I can make it work. Here is a link to it. It is poorly illustrated, but if anyone has any words of wisdom or guidance concerning its design, by all means please share! Thanks again!!

Catalina Direct: Anchor Roller

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My only concern would be having 25lbs hung out over the bow on a little boat, and whether you have sufficient power to actually dig the anchor in properly.
 

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I would have a smaller anchor and use that for a storm anchor. I believe in overkill but it seems like a lot of weight up there for a tiny boat. However, if you can mount a bow roller for it, it might work OK for you.

BTW, I saw the Dashews motor yacht in England a few years ago. The had a Rocna that was two sizes bigger than recommended.

If you anchor a lot, bigger is nice, more than one anchor is nice, and one you can haul up without a windlass is nice too.

I am a big believer in all chain rodes for tight spots, but I also use rope as it is much easier, lighter, and stretches nicely in most situations.


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I'll take the contrary view and say that yes it is too big, at least for your primary anchor. Certainly won't go anywhere, but not something I'd want hanging off the stem. or handling all the time.

I'd get something smaller for a primary and keep the mantus as your storm anchor or overnight anchor if you want. Nice thing about the mantus is it breaks down for storage.

(edited)... I would have a smaller anchor and use that for a storm anchor. I believe in overkill but it seems like a lot of weight up there for a tiny boat. However, if you can mount a bow roller for it, it might work OK for you.

If you anchor a lot, bigger is nice, more than one anchor is nice, and one you can haul up without a windlass is nice too.
I agree with the quoted posts. I anchor most nights when sailing. I also like to anchor any old time, don't want to make a big deal out of it. Lunch, stop for a painting or swim or just a good look around. Big anchor is a big deal, you won't anchor much if too difficult. I sail both on and off the anchor, backwinding the sail to set. Wave action and windage will bury the anchor after a bit. I often dive on it if not too deep, so I see how it looks.

On my 23 ft. I use a 13 lb. Rocna for the bow. Works fantastic, I'd have a Mantus there if they'd been available at the time. I keep a 25 lb. Mantus disassembled and flat for a storm anchor. Plenty of time to assemble if a storm is brewing. I keep a large Danforth in a stern locker for holding in position (nice when painting scene, or near rocks, or putting on the brakes). But the Danforth is almost useless on a rock bottom. I carry lots of spare nylon rode, it's lightweight and elastic. I of course use some chain between the anchor and the nylon. Three anchors means I can lose one and still be prepared. If you don't use chain near the anchor, here in Maine ledge can slice your rode.

Though the marine forecast called for beautiful weather, SW light winds, we were hit once just before light with a NE hard blow and rain all morning with no protection from the nearby islands. Yeah, I could have put out another anchor, but the 13 lb. Rocna held solid, we swung to the wind but did not move an inch. When it ended we swung back to our original position. My small wife pulled the 13 lb. Rocna up after, she likes raising the anchor. She wouldn't like the 25 too much.

Too much weight in or over the bow will help make it difficult for the bow to rise in sudden big wakes, and on the ocean they can be BIG.
 
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