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I'm thinking about changing the layout of my 1981 O'Day 28. I want to move the wall at the V-Birth aft about a foot. Rotate the head 90 degrees to face aft on the port side and extend the galley along the port side to meet up with the head's aft wall. I know the floor pan adds to the stiffness of the hull so I need to be careful about my cuts and add stiffness back in when I redo the floor.

Has anyone tried doing this before? What were your results?
 

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I'm not familiar, but bulkheads are often structural, not just adding stiffness. Dangerous move, if you're not an engineer.

Why go through the trouble? Sell it and buy one that is better suited to what you want. It would probably be cheaper too. If not simply in materials and labor, then in what it will do to your resale value. No one will ever want to buy a DIY engineered boat, unless the modification is very common.
 

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No one will ever want to buy a DIY engineered boat, unless the modification is very common.
This ^^^^^

Even if you don't mess up the structural integrity of the boat (which is a very good possibility) you will destroy its resale value.

These are not just minor changes that you are talking about. You would be time and money ahead to just sell the boat and buy one that better suits your needs.

Good luck, whatever you do.
 

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Yeah, just don't like others have said. Buy something that fits what you want or get accustomed to what you have. Why go through all that work to make a boat that others are probably not going to want? But, I have a feeling this is going to just happen anyway no matter what people say. Seems to be how these things go....
 

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I'm a big fan of customizing production boats to get a custom tailored craft but your plans go over the top.

Moving structural bulkheads is, in most cases, an extremely bad idea - they are where they are for a reason. It's like cutting out a load bearing wall in a house only worse.

Sell and buy something closer to what you want by way of fundamentals and tailor it from there.
 
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There are plenty of cheap 30 foot sailboats that, because of that couple of feet of extra length, have far more cubic living area. That makes all the bunk layouts and head accommodations, galley.... more livable. It is a losing economic deal trying to make a 28 footer into a 30 footer.
 

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If that is a deck stepped mast, I'd give it a hard NO!

If keel stepped I'd say maybe... but is it really worth all that effort and expense?

+1 to all of the structural concerns mentioned above. Plus unless you are a very capable marine carpenter, your resale possiblities are greatyly diminished.

Unless you are already engaged in a complete gut and rebuild of this boat, I think you are better off looking for a boat that better suits your needs.
 

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Have fun. The main bulkhead that supports the inward and maybe upward pressure of the cap shrouds and other bulkheads or knees that support other stays are the ones you have to pretty much leave in place. The rest are usually dictated by the furniture in the boat with little regard for whether reinforcing is actually needed. Check the tabbing out and you'll discover they are glassed in place with a single layer fiberglass tab that has very little to do with reinforcing the hull. Forward you will often sea glassed in stringers to actually reinforce the hull and a bulkhead or two that will serve to reinforce the hull against the pounding going to weather. These bulkheads can be cut away to a foot extension or so if it must be moved out of the way but completely eliminating them is ill advised. If you take care in glassing in any furniture that you add, the boat will probably be stronger than the way it was originally configured. Doesn't matter whether it's a deck stepped mast or not, just don't mess with the mast that supports the mast or even beef it up.

But therein lies the real issue. There is only so much you can do to a 28' boat to make better use of space. What will the modifications do to the resale value. How competent are you doing a high quality finish on the modifications. If it looks amateurish, will definitely detract from the value.
 
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