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Hey guys, just about a year ago I picked up this 28ft no name sloop, built and sailed from Dalmatia, Croatia. 28ft with a 10ft beam, The hull is built from 1 1/2" thick white oak planking and the frame is built from Dalmatian Pine. The boat is in really great shape overall and doesntt need much work to be floated.

The Problem:
The previous owner, in preparation for replacing the rotten bow stem, cut the planking on the bow in all sorts of weird ways. I've crafted a new bow stem but honestly have no clue what to do with the bow planking.

Any suggestions or advice would be appreciated, I've attached some pictures.

In the last picture you can see the boat after hurricane irene had a go at my enclosure, but you can also see the completed bow stem secured to the boat.
 

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You should post this on the Woodenboat Forum.
He probably cut back to good wood in each plank. You can extend those planks by butt blocks or scarfs. If you butt them you should space the butts so that three frames or three planks seperate adjacent butts. Scarfing might be a good solution, but oak does not hold glue well if thick.
 

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As others have more or less suggested, you should remove the forward existing planking back to the first butt block on each plank. Care should be taken in removing the planks to mark the frame where each plank crosses the frames and mark the plank where each plank crosses frame so that you do not have to try to 'line off' the planks yourself. If you are careful, you should be able to use the existing planks as a pattern and take off the bevels, as well as the general shapes.

Looking at your photos, my hunch is that you may have this backward. I would suspect that the frames are oak and the planking is 1 1/2" thick Dalmatian Pine.

I am actually familiar with these boats. When I lived in Savannah in the late 1970's and early 1980's, I had a friend who owned a Concordia Yawl and who bought one of these for his wife to mess with. I sailed with them a few times. I must say his boat did not sail all that well. One of the reasons that I was sailing on the boat was to try to help the owner develop modifications to try to help the boat's sailing ability. In the end, he had bought the boat so cheaply that he decided it was not worth putting any money into.
 

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Agree with Jeff H on lumber,pine is difficult to bend oak is almost impossible.Would use juniper or cypress instead of pine.marc
 

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It would. But also the planks really don't bend that much. They bend along the hull, the up and down shape is cut into them. But you might find that those are pretty uniform. Try bending a standard (1x4?) piece against the planking to see how it goes. Some planks will bend easily into place, others require leverage. Few need steam.
 

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Hey guys, just about a year ago I picked up this 28ft no name sloop, built and sailed from Dalmatia, Croatia. 28ft with a 10ft beam, The hull is built from 1 1/2" thick white oak planking and the frame is built from Dalmatian Pine.
I live in Split, Croatia, and I have similar boat, but mine is in much worse condition. Those boats were built in Betina, vilage with small shipyard on Murter Island in Croatian part of Adriatic sea, in '60 and '70, and most of them were exported in USA.
This is not noname boat. It's name is Viking 28.
The hull is built from pine (1") on oak's frame (1 1/2").
I am interested to see your progress, can you post more pictures?
 

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He hasn't posted in two months, I don't know if he will see this. You should post any wood boat repair questions on the WoodenBoat Forum, google it.
 
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