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Discussion Starter #1
Hey there!

I am doing a mayor renovation/upgrading project of my Compis 28, I figured it would be good to post about it here to get inspiration and some heads ups. Pictures will come by the end of the week.

Goal:
To have her good for liveaboard & crossing the atlantic by summer 2018. (no later than 1st of september).

Part goals:
She will have been converted to electrical propulsion with >8 hours range á 4kts
LPG system installed to power Stove, Oven, Refrigerator and heater
Complementary 230v system when in harbor to power stove, refrigerator, charging, a decent amount of 230v outputs as well as a dry air generator.
12v system to cover the usual stuff + charger for laptop, phone and gas evacuation fans.

so far
So far I have been able to remove the old Yanmar 8hp diesel engine since an oil pipe rusted a hole, other than that it seems to work fine despite all the rust.

I have also managed to remove almost all the interior, this week I plan to remove the last interior and also the insulation.

Moneywise I try to keep the costs down by investing hours, even though Im not very experienced in any of this.
 

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The Compis 28 was a nice modernization of the Folkboat concept. She should be a nice boat when you are done. That Yanmar 8 was a nice engine for that era.

Good luck with the project.
 

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Mirage 33
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Interesting project, any pictures?

I'm also curious on your reasoning for pulling the yanmar (especially if it ran). I know electric drive is quieter and cleaner, but if I was crossing an ocean, especially on a small boat, I'd want good options for long range motoring if required. Electric drive is nice in some ways, but do you have a backup plan to charge the batteries if you end up in many days of lackluster solar exposure (assuming you are using panels to re-charge?).
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I was trying to make a logical and sound argument for lifting out the Yanmar, but nuh. Closest I could get is that I feel that if an oil pipe rusts apart, the next stuff will soon follow.

As for the least logical, but most true reason; I like the challenge. Pretty fond of the idea of being able to "refuel" while sailing and I believe that I could make it work for long distances. Granted, it can not beat a diesel engine at range. However I might be able to get enough range for me.


About recharging, I don't hold much hope for solar panels to do more than equal the consumption of my navigation systems, the real recharging would be from the engine and a wind turbine. As long as I have wind, the engine will produce power using the propeller. I don't believe it will be as powerful as the generator on a diesel engine, but then again it might be enough. Wind turbines speak for themselves.
 

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Mirage 33
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I was trying to make a logical and sound argument for lifting out the Yanmar, but nuh. Closest I could get is that I feel that if an oil pipe rusts apart, the next stuff will soon follow.

As for the least logical, but most true reason; I like the challenge. Pretty fond of the idea of being able to "refuel" while sailing and I believe that I could make it work for long distances. Granted, it can not beat a diesel engine at range. However I might be able to get enough range for me.


About recharging, I don't hold much hope for solar panels to do more than equal the consumption of my navigation systems, the real recharging would be from the engine and a wind turbine. As long as I have wind, the engine will produce power using the propeller. I don't believe it will be as powerful as the generator on a diesel engine, but then again it might be enough. Wind turbines speak for themselves.

Fair enough, I appreciate your point of view. Up to you, but small "suitcase" Honda generators can be kept below in a small boat and are very robust. That may be a good "use in case of emergency" if you did jump the pond. I would say you could get quite a few full charges into your batteries even on one jerry of fuel. Just a thought though, it's your boat, have fun with it and enjoy the refit, it's alot of work but very rewarding! :2 boat:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks! :) Yes I've been looking at the hondas as an emergency option and I think it sounds like a good idea
 

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I am not sure that is a good idea. You are bringing gasoline (Petrol) into the cabin of a boat that is not set up for gasoline. When you have a gasoline engine, there is mandatory passive bilge venting, a electrical bilge blower, all switches are supposed to be sealed, you are supposed to run your bilge blower before igniting the stove and so on. But also, you will need a secure place to lash the genset on deck when you are using it where it will not get submerged, and where you can safely run comparatively large wires down below.

I also want to point out that charging off the propeller of the boat and wind generator may be dangerous on a small boat. To get enough force to produce a useful amount of power production the propeller should be a larger diameter (than normally required for the engine on a boat this size) and a three blade propeller. This results in a lot of drag. So does a wind generator. The added drag is not all that noticeable on a bigger boat, but small boats count on being able to accelerate to absorb the force of the wind, especially in a gust. Even small amounts of added drag can result in more significant keel angles and frequent knockdowns.

Jeff
 

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I am not sure that is a good idea. You are bringing gasoline (Petrol) into the cabin of a boat that is not set up for gasoline. When you have a gasoline engine, there is mandatory passive bilge venting, a electrical bilge blower, all switches are supposed to be sealed, you are supposed to run your bilge blower before igniting the stove and so on. But also, you will need a secure place to lash the genset on deck when you are using it where it will not get submerged, and where you can safely run comparatively large wires down below.

I also want to point out that charging off the propeller of the boat and wind generator may be dangerous on a small boat. To get enough force to produce a useful amount of power production the propeller should be a larger diameter (than normally required for the engine on a boat this size) and a three blade propeller. This results in a lot of drag. So does a wind generator. The added drag is not all that noticeable on a bigger boat, but small boats count on being able to accelerate to absorb the force of the wind, especially in a gust. Even small amounts of added drag can result in more significant keel angles and frequent knockdowns.

Jeff
I definitely can't argue gasoline is "safe", no petroleum product techemically is. That being said if you take care of it and consider it's hazards you'll be fine. Lots of gas engine boats out there with shoddy old steel tanks. I'm not saying none have caught fire but they aren't blowing up left and right. A jerry on the deck properly lashed should be ok. I keep 4 on my boat for long trips as my engine is gasoline powered.

I also regularly fly dozens of jerry cans at a time in Bell 212 and 205 helicopters for work to remote and dicey locations. Even survived one helicopter crash with them onboard and nothing blew up like in the movies.

Like I said though, gas can be dangerous, I won't argue that, but if managed properly 5gal of gas won't be the most dangerous item on a sail.
 

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I definitely can't argue gasoline is "safe", no petroleum product techemically is. That being said if you take care of it and consider it's hazards you'll be fine. Lots of gas engine boats out there with shoddy old steel tanks. I'm not saying none have caught fire but they aren't blowing up left and right. A jerry on the deck properly lashed should be ok. I keep 4 on my boat for long trips as my engine is gasoline powered.

I also regularly fly dozens of jerry cans at a time in Bell 212 and 205 helicopters for work to remote and dicey locations. Even survived one helicopter crash with them onboard and nothing blew up like in the movies.

Like I said though, gas can be dangerous, I won't argue that, but if managed properly 5gal of gas won't be the most dangerous item on a sail.
I am actually one of those people who have no problem with gasoline fueled auxiliaries but boats which have gasoline below deck, need to meet different safety standards than boats which do not have gasoline below deck. But to me the requirement for passive ventilation is a deal killer if the goal is making offshore passages, because even with dorades, there is not a good way to prevent the ventilators from bringing a lot of water into the cabin, and they can't be closed off and still be safe.

And there is a difference between jerry cans carried on deck where they can vent, vs down below.

That was all I was saying.

Jeff
 

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Discussion Starter #10
these requirements, where do you find them and where are they a must? Smaller boats are very loosely regulated over here, pretty much make sure you have lanterns and damn you if you empty the toilet in the sea.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Great! thanks, even though these rules don't apply here (yet) there is a lot of sound reasoning behind them. Very good to have in mind when it comes to building.
 
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