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"Anything I should be particularly wary of?"

How about the fact that it is a home built, wooden boat, from the 60's or 70's, with an iron keel. Unless you have experience with wooden boats, I would stay away. Thats just my opinion, and others might feel differently.
 

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Just a bit curious, but do you have any experience with wooden boats? Do you and your friends have any idea of the problems they can have or the amount of work they are to maintain???

If not, you might want to find out a bit more about wooden boats before continuing. They can be massive time and money sinkholes for people without the woodworking, carpentry, and finishing skills to repair and maintain them. Most are a massive labor of love—done for the love of owning a wooden boat.

Personally, I prefer sailing to varnishing, and own a plastic boat for that reason. YMMV.

BTW, a 30' boat that is priced that low is usually in need of some fairly serious repairs. If you don't know a surveyor that is experienced in surveying wooden boats, you shouldn't even bother looking at it IMHO. Also, almost all the pictures of a boat LIE about the boat's true condition.

Mahogany on oak to be exact. Sitka Spruce masts. Fiberglassed iron centre board, lead and iron ballast. Ad says it was custom built in the 60's or 70's.

Looks to be in pretty good shape from the pictures, though a bit of a fixer-upper (exactly what my friends and i want).

Here's the thing though: The price is only 3200 Canadian. Anything I should be particularly wary of? For a 30 footer to have a centerboard is rather odd from my research, is this a bad thing?

Thanks for the advice =)
 

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I'd be wary of the 75,000 dollar US cost of restoration, otherwise it's likely a fine boat for a custom, built in someone's back yard to eyeball measurements type of boat.
 

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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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I have owned several wooden boats in my life time. The construction material and centerboard suggests that the boat was probably built in the 1950's to mid- 1960's as wooden boats with a CB had gotten pretty rare by the 1970's. That would make this a 40-50 year old wooden boat. If it hasn't been done, a wooden boat of this era probably is ready for its second refastening which typically means it will need some replacement frames and planking. Boats of this era, with iron keels or centerboards typically will need new keel bolts as well. 30-50 year old spars typically need regluing. And so on. And these wooden boat issues are in addition to the usual old boat of any material needs.

Which brings me to my point, Boats of this era were pretty mediocre sailers, wooden boats of this era had very cramped interiors, and there is a very limited resale market for wooden boats, so unless you love working with wood, and are more interested in working on wooden boats than sailing, this sounds like a really bad idea. There are people who buy boats simply because the enjoy working on boats. If you are one of these, and this is a good design, then this is probably a decent project for you. But for most people, owning a boat is about getting out on the water, and you can buy an old 30 foot fiberglass boat that is in sailing condition and it will sail better, have more room, be less work to restore and own, and will cost way less than you will spend buying, repairing, and keeping this old girl in decent sailing condition.

Respectfully.
Jeff
 

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Mahogany on oak to be exact. Sitka Spruce masts. Fiberglassed iron centre board, lead and iron ballast. Ad says it was custom built in the 60's or 70's.

Looks to be in pretty good shape from the pictures, though a bit of a fixer-upper (exactly what my friends and i want).

Here's the thing though: The price is only 3200 Canadian. Anything I should be particularly wary of? For a 30 footer to have a centerboard is rather odd from my research, is this a bad thing?

Thanks for the advice =)
Well, you have already had some good advice on this thread and I can only agree largely with what has been said especially about the labour of love and inexhaustable demand for money associated with wooden boats.

In my experience, photos are a very poor gauge of condition. If a boat looks bad in a photo, then the chances are that it is a shipwreck, but most boats actually look OK in a website photo, even if they are in fact in poor condition. I speak from long experience!

Don't be disheartened by what you have read. The boat of your dreams is out there. It's just that you need a fixer-upper not a millstone which will sink you. :eek:

Good hunting

Stuart
 
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