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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My boat has a 30 year old Platismo stove that was never commissioned...it has never been used. It appears that that this is a French product and it does not appear that Platismo stoves are imported to the US (at least not commonly). What are the recommendations, whether or not, that this stove is worth trying to use for the next 10 years or so?

I am guessing that I should just buy a new stove, but wanted to ask the question.
 

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Dollars to donuts your 30 year old stove is a better built piece of equipment than anything made today. If you don't want it, I'll pay to ship it down here to me.
 

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I have a 37 year old Shipmate propane stove that is still working just fine. I had the delivery tubes to the burners replaced a few years ago while cruising in the Philippines.
 

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Make sure it's actually a propane, and not butane, stove. Many European boats use butane, in fact my Jeanneau factory manuals refer to the butane system which was decommissioned/replaced with propane at the factory (though the rigid butane piping is still there). As another mentioned, you also need a solenoid valve in the propane locker.


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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Wow, thanks for all of the responses. This is good news. I'll check into the propane vs butane. It is pretty amazing that much of the original documentation came with the boat, so I've got some information on the stove. I will try to find a source for parts, etc.

Interesting side note....the fresh water system and the stove were never commissioned on the boat. But, all of the original parts were returned with the boat. Two flexible bags for freshwater (not used) and the propane (maybe butane) container were returned to the boat when I took possession of it. Everything is bagged and marked.
 

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Seems to me it is less the stove I would worry about and more the rest of the system. Make sure all the hoses are replaced, as at 30 years they either are rotted (rubber hose) or work hardened and brittle (Hard copper lines). The stove while an expensive piece of kit is not the most important part of the system. Keep in mind it is a system, and needs to be kept in working order. Make sure there is a solenoid and it is working also make sure the propane locker is properly drained overboard. European boats tend to have setups that don't meet current ABYC standards. The insurance company may not say anything now, but you can bet they will notice any out of standard system if there is ever a claim. This will likely result in not paying.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Boy, I don't know what I did wrong on my web search last night, but now I'm turning up many places in the US that sell the Platismo brand of marine stove.

Now I've got to figure out what to do about the propane locker. That is going to be really tough.
 

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Even if the stove runs on butane or CNG the burner's orifice can be resized to use propane. I did it on my own stove switching from CNG to propane. There are kits available to make the switch.
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
It turns out that the 30 year old Plastimo stove was to operate from Butane. I browsed around the web and found a little information about converting fuels. The main thing was the Compressed Natural Gas comes to a house at 11 psi (or inches, not sure which) and Propane is delivered at 5 psi (or inches). So the conversion is the account for the difference in pressure. I believe a container of Butane and Propane are at about the same pressure, so it seems that no conversion is necessary. So far, this is filled with too many assumptions. I'm just wondering if someone has more information about this.

BTW: I read an article that says Propane and Butane (called it a hybrid) are sometimes put in the same container.
 

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It turns out that the 30 year old Plastimo stove was to operate from Butane. I browsed around the web and found a little information about converting fuels. The main thing was the Compressed Natural Gas comes to a house at 11 psi (or inches, not sure which) and Propane is delivered at 5 psi (or inches). So the conversion is the account for the difference in pressure. I believe a container of Butane and Propane are at about the same pressure, so it seems that no conversion is necessary. So far, this is filled with too many assumptions. I'm just wondering if someone has more information about this.

BTW: I read an article that says Propane and Butane (called it a hybrid) are sometimes put in the same container.
Go for the pros - email or give them a call:

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It turns out that the 30 year old Plastimo stove was to operate from Butane. I browsed around the web and found a little information about converting fuels. The main thing was the Compressed Natural Gas comes to a house at 11 psi (or inches, not sure which) and Propane is delivered at 5 psi (or inches) (snip)
First, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) is stored in a high pressure cylinder, and typically only found on fleet vehicles, most commonly busses in city transit fleets. It is NEVER delivered to homes.

Next, let's get the pressure issue straight. All household fuel gasses are delivered at low pressure, less than 1 psi, and measured not in PSI but inches of water column, which many of us are not familiar with. 1 psi = 27.68 inches of water column. Household natural gas enters the house at about 3.5" wc, which is roughly 0.126 psi. LPG enters the house at 10-12" wc, which is still well less than one half pound per square inch (~0.361 - 0.433 psi). Household stoves, ovens, furnaces, clothes dryers, etc, all work at these pressures. The same is true for most outdoor heating and cooking appliances - pool heaters, barbeques and marine stoves included. I have a Force 10 two burner with oven on my boat, and the input pressure is 30 milibars. Yet another unit that many of us are not familiar with, but it's equal to 12" wc. BTW, if you check out the Force 10 specs, you'll see that under fuel it specifies: Propane/Butane.

Propane is a specific gas, as is Butane, and in the past these names have been used as a generic, but often incorrectly. The best way to refer to these fuels is LPG (liquified petroleum gas). The fact is that LPG for residential and motor vehicle use can contain a varied mix of gasses dependent on intended use and the location of use. Butane by itself is typically used in very small appliances (such as cigarette lighters), the largest found are portable "tabletop" single burner cookers like this:

Butane is used for these purposes because of its vapor pressure characteristics, propane doesn't work nearly as well in very small volumes.
 
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