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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking to start a friendly 34 vs 37 discussion. I'm trying to decide between the two and here's what I've considered the positives for each. My use would be 50% coastal and 50% offshore.

PSC 34
Easier to singlehand, both cruising and docking.
Lower moorage costs
Lower maintainance costs
Less expensive to purchase or newer boat for same price

PSC 37
Larger cabin (occasionally there will be 4 adults on board for overnight cruises)
Larger cockpit (nice when those 4 adults want to sit outside)
More storage for longer cruises

Too be honest it may come down to the best deal available when it comes time to purchase. However I'd like some more input that may steer me in one direction or another.

Thanks
 

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Do the 37, the 3 foot itis will bite you soon after you buy the 34, might as well start bigger, it'll certainly not get you again, if you do it right away... :)

This is my logic with the wife... so far she's not buying it.
 

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Tin,
I dont necessarily agree with your decision points:
Maintenance costs are the same for either boat and either boat is easily singlehanded.Moorage costs could be less if costs are per foot but a mooring would be the same for either.Purchase prices are very similar and more dependent on age and condition.
Both boats are very similar in sailing charectaristics and only slightly different in size.The largest differences that I know of are the interior arrangement of the head,galley and chart table.As you noted the cockpit is smaller on the 34 and the propane locker on the 37 is very different on the 34.I own a 37 and have sailed quite a bit on a 34 and in my opinion either boat is a great voyaging boat with the 37 having a bit more room in every dimension.
Hope this helps,
Dianne and Chuck Burke S/V NiftyNickers C37 #139
 

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The side decks of the 34 are wider than those of the 37. For you all who varnish, you can sit on the 34 decks while you work. For those who carry jugs on deck, you can walk by the jugs on a 34.

I am a small and older person and the smaller sails of the 34 are easier to handle in a thunderstorm.

Bill Murdoch
1988 PSC 34
Irish Eyes
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Do the 37, the 3 foot itis will bite you soon after you buy the 34, might as well start bigger, it'll certainly not get you again, if you do it right away... :)

This is my logic with the wife... so far she's not buying it.
I was going to point out the 40 is 3 feet bigger than the 37 but they start at 250k which is a quick cure for 3 footitis. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Niftynickers, excellent points and exactly the input I'm looking for.
wsmurdoch, I'm going to have to look closer at the side deck room on both. I just turned 50 and plan on my next boat being my last so things like sail handling are valid concerns.
 

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I agree they are close enough in cost of ownership that cost of purchase and layout should drive your choice. I like the layout of the 34 (forecabin and salon) much better for a couple, but for sure the galley is a bit more roomy on the 37. Cockpit on the 34 is plenty big IMHO.

Nifty - what is the propane tank like on the 37? It for sure is a terrible design on the 34.
 

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The 37 was the first design, and the 34 came later. I have heard that Crealock said that he made some minor changes to the 34 design based on the 37 experience. If you look at overall length and the waterline length dimensions it appears that Crealock shortened slightly the overhangs.

Both the 37 and the 34 are very similar, excellent designs that we love. It does make sense though that an excellent designer like Crealock would have tried to apply what he learned from the first design experience (PS37) when he made the second design (PS34).

Brian Stipak
PS34 #67, 1987
S/V Ubiquity, Pacific Seacraft 34 Sailboat
 

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Raindog,

The propane locker on the 37 is under the poop-deck lid.We have a lazarette behind the cockpit coaming that is where the locker is located large enough for 2 - 10# bottles.
I never noticed that the side decks are wider on the 34 does that mean that the interior headroom is less?Interesting.

Dianne and Chuck Burke S/V NiftyNickers C37 #139
 

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The 37 was the first design, and the 34 came later. I have heard that Crealock said that he made some minor changes to the 34 design based on the 37 experience. If you look at overall length and the waterline length dimensions it appears that Crealock shortened slightly the overhangs.

Both the 37 and the 34 are very similar, excellent designs that we love. It does make sense though that an excellent designer like Crealock would have tried to apply what he learned from the first design experience (PS37) when he made the second design (PS34).

Brian Stipak
PS34 #67, 1987
S/V Ubiquity, Pacific Seacraft 34 Sailboat
Using the same logic the 31 was third design and the canoe stern was gotten rid of.
Just saying...

My understanding is that Crealock designed the 37 without pressure from a builder, it was the design he would go sailing in. Cruising Consultants picked it up and had the molds built, built a few boats and when they went under Pacific Seacraft picked up the molds. The 34 and 31 were done at Pacific Seacraft's request and their input. The Cabo Ricos were done with Cabo Ricos input and requirements. His biggest regret on the 37 seemed to be that he had not patented an idea that he had come up with a few years earlier that was very similiar to the Scheel keel.

When the 44 was introduced I never got the feeling Crealock was all that happy with the design. Too many comprimises to stretch the 37 to 44 and he actually expressed that at the Pacific Seacraft (Fullerton) introduction of the boat.

The 44 mold development and the move to Fullerton (satisfying the Air Quatlity Management District requirements) put the company into financial stress and they sold out to the Singapore based corporation. A few years later the founders left and founded Cabo Sportfishers and began production in the first town east of the Air Quality Management District.

The 40 had the benefit of everything that came before it, but it is a significantly larger (and more costly) boat then the 37 or 34.

Between the 37 and 34, I believe the biggest issue is the difference in storage on the boats and the propane locker. The aft propane locker on the 37 is large enough to store 2 10 lb tanks as well as a 5 gallon gasoline tank, diesel engine oil, hydraulic fluid(autopilot), 2 stroke oil and any acetone, etc fluid you may want to store on a longer range trip/cruise although for insurance purposes I only store propane in the propane locker.

I do like the shallow cockpit locker on starboard side of the Crealock 34 above the quarter berth. If I had the same on Crazy Fish I would modify it to make it a bit deeper to store a liferaft in a valise. Currently have a Switlick canister mounted just forward of where the dodger used to be and it just destroys visibility forward when seated in the cockpit.

Being used to the 37 the 34 down below just feels a bit pinched to me.

Having converted Crazy Fish from a wheel to tiller, in either the 34 or the 37 I would seek out a tiller boat. The wheel pedestal breaks up the cockpit and with the tiller you get to sit up forward in the cockpit rather then behind the wheel when driving the boat, there is a lot more feel with the tiller and at anchor the cockpit has a lot more space. Going to work on a solution where with the Monitor windvane or the below decks autopilot (WH) is engaged the tiller does not sweep the cockpit.

So I recommend going with the 37 but if you would be interested in a well-found 34 for under $100,000 there is one sitting across me. Boat was recently sailed down from the Pacific Northwest to San Diego and the owner was making final preparations to head south when family health issues caused him to alter his plans. Boat is ready to go.

Regards

Marc Hall
Crazy Fish - Maintaining, Upgrading and Sailing a Crealock 37 | SV Crazy Fish
 

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Ahoy Tinpusher ( are you an air traffic controller? )
This last spring, I went through the same analysis before deciding on a 37. The previously mentioned differences, however, were not what caused me to opt for the larger boat. It was the feeling I had aboard each.
I strongly urge you to compare the two side by side. I happened to go to Crusader Yacht Sales in Annapolis to look at their inventory and, at the time, they had several 34s and 37s side by side. I was able to step from one to another and in doing so, it was apparent to me that I really liked the 37 much better. The cabin layout clicked with me. It did not on the 34.
I realize this is my personal choice, but that is the point.
I urge you to make the effort to find an opportunity for a side by side comparison. If you look at them individually, and separately, you lose the sense of what is better for you during a immediate and direct comparison.
I was fortunate to find a very nice 37 ( though not at Crusader ) and am very happy with it. Good luck!
Bill
 

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I agree with choosing a tiller over a wheel. Less moving parts and a big difference in the cockpit once the hook is down. Only regret I have with my 37.
+1! The tiller on my boat is very nice. It was ordered that way from the factory by the original owner. The boat is so well balanced and nimble that the steering forces are no greater than they were on my Dana. And the space below the cockpit deck was then available for a very useful 32 gallon aux fuel tank. :)
I will mention that the tiller boats (if originally built that way from the factory) require somewhat more creativity and work when installing a proper under deck autopilot. There is the fiberglass tube, that houses the rudder shaft, in place. To allow access to the rudder shaft, for an added on rudder arm, the tube needs to be cut and a seal installed ( like the wheel boats have ). Not difficult, just some extra work.
 

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Bear with me on this...

I have a PS37. Recently we were leaving a sheltered anchorage, heading out into humungous waves. As we motored out and up onto the first wave, I looked down into the deep but rather short trough and just assumed that we would submarine, hoping the anchors would work as a nice battering ram. But to my absolute surprise we did not submarine; we rode up and over every wave. As many times before, I realized that my PS37 is a very expensive cork. It just doesn't care about the wave conditions (that I have encountered).

I could be completely wrong about this, but I wonder whether a PS34, with the shorter overhang forward, would be so nimble in such conditions. I assume that the overhang on my 37 provides extra buoyancy. Surely it wasn't designed in just for style. There's something Crealock saw in having that extra boat way up forward, above the waterline. (My hunch is that a more modern design, with a LOA that's almost the same as waterline length, would have been under water in those conditions. No crisis, assuming all hatches and ports are shut, but not fun.)

Just a thought. No doubt this will spark all sorts of views on buoyancy and overhangs. I realize that I could be wrong about why my 37 rides over waves so well.

One more comment: I sail alone most of the time, sometimes with my partner. I would definitely NOT get a smaller boat. The 37 is easy to handle alone (OK, backing to starboard ain't easy.) There's gobs of living space in the 37, but what one really needs is storage and tankage. Can't have enough of the latter in my opinion (because it's hard work for me to get fuel and even harder to get water, almost like being on passage all the time.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Ahoy Tinpusher ( are you an air traffic controller? )
Yes I'm ATC, do you fly?
I would love to have the opportunity to see the two boats side by side. There is currently a 34 and 37 listed on Yachtworld down in Seattle and I'm planning on going to the boat show there in January. I think seeing both of them on the same day will be very telling.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
After reading all these great reviews of the Crealock 37 I will now mention that my beautiful, well maintained, well equipped ,tiller steered,cutter rigged 37 is for sale for less than $70k.].

Thanks for reading,

Dianne and Chuck Burke S/V NiftyNickers C37 #139
Looks like a great deal Chuck but I'm on the West Coast and hoping to save the $10,000 trucking cost across the country. Good luck.
 

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Yes I'm ATC, do you fly?
I would love to have the opportunity to see the two boats side by side. There is currently a 34 and 37 listed on Yachtworld down in Seattle and I'm planning on going to the boat show there in January. I think seeing both of them on the same day will be very telling.
While I am a pilot, better yet, I'm a controller at SFO tower. I'd be happy to share my experiences, if you would like. PM me.
 
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