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Schooner Captain
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Discussion Starter #1
While looking at the overpriced calligo rigging terminators I noticed they appear to be normal plastic.
What stops someone, you or me, from 3D printing these?
Is the 3D print material strong enough? They have made a gun that can fire a few shots, but i am not familiar with the material.
 

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While looking at the overpriced calligo rigging terminators I noticed they appear to be normal plastic.
What stops someone, you or me, from 3D printing these?
Is the 3D print material strong enough? They have made a gun that can fire a few shots, but i am not familiar with the material.
3D printing is not very strong and Caligo terminators are made of T6061 aluminum and Black hard coat anodized not plastic. they are very high quality
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PDukOSDq4fc&feature=player_embedded
 

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Schooner Captain
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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
taulman 618 Nylon material claims
taulman's goal is to have the strongest 3D Printing materials available. His team has already submitted a new copolymer for samples. "While this new copolymer will be nylon based, it will use a different mfg method and will provide even stronger material properties, a lower print temperature and slightly less pliability for stronger small parts and larger parts that hopefully rival aluminium for some applications." added taulman.
of course there is always a multi axis cnc that can mill aluminum too.
 

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UP, I'm sure there is a patent pending if not one in place already. However, it wouldn't take much to make your own. So go for it. Then get it anodized, then have them load tested, then start a business, buy insurance, market it, set up a website, and sell a bunch. Let us know how much you would charge for them.

There are other ways around it, the easiest one would be to use turnbuckles after you're shrouds are pre-stretched. I'm doing this on an i550 sportboat, and a 26' keelboat racer replacing all the rod rigging. I've also made an emergency shroud for a J120 at a fraction of the cost of the calligo ones using low friction rings.
 

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Schooner Captain
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Discussion Starter #6
I need 28 ends for the new rigging. I just want to come out ahead. It would also be nice to make emergency repair parts as needed. or even something as simple as a stove knob that melted.

I do not wish to start a business like this, just keep myself happy and in the money.
 

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You think you can get away with that, Colligo will be on you like stink on ****. Just ask Erik Précourt, who actually was doing textile rigging long before Colligo came along
 

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Schooner Captain
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Discussion Starter #8
You think you can get away with that, Colligo will be on you like stink on ****.
I am talking about making my own, not starting to sell them. I can produce any copyrighted, or patented item for my own use
 

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You do know that there are search engines which companies use to search for references to their product names, and that Colligo now surely knows you are interested in knocking off his product?
 

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Schooner Captain
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Discussion Starter #10
You do know that there are search engines which companies use to search for references to their product names, and that Colligo now surely knows you are interested in knocking off his product?
what are you talking about?
 

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MHG, he's not looking to sell them, just make them for his own use.

UP, I'd be worried about your selection of materials. Certain plastics are great, but you need to have intimate knowledge of cyclical loading and how a rig applies that tension. A background working with a program like "solidworks" would be helpful.

If that little CNC machine can mill T6061 aluminum, then I'd just make it from that and be done with it. But milling bits aren't cheap, and you still need to polish all sides the line would rub on to limit chafe.
 

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Simply well manufactured, well designed dead eyes and variations. The idea is as old as rope and boats. I'm sure they have design patents that cover SPECIFIC designs, but the concepts are generic. Nothing to stop knock-offs that are sufficiently different.

That said, given the low volume, matching those designs would make you earn your keep. Making them one-off or a few-off would be tiresome. 3-D printing? You have not studied, or comprehended, the forces involved. Crush.
 

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FWIW, the cheap 3D printers that use reels of plastic rod stock do not product structural items. You can use them to make some replacement parts, but probably nothing you'd want to use in any part of your rigging.

There are other 3D printing methods (laser sintering for example) that can produce structural parts, especially out of aluminum and titanium. They use them in aerospace to save weight over and have better strength than cast and milled parts. That stuff is a bit pricier, though, and would need extensive hand-finishing to match the smooth (chafe-preventing) finish of those parts.
 

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Schooner Captain
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Discussion Starter #14
FWIW, the cheap 3D printers that use reels of plastic rod stock do not product structural items. You can use them to make some replacement parts, but probably nothing you'd want to use in any part of your rigging.

There are other 3D printing methods (laser sintering for example) that can produce structural parts, especially out of aluminum and titanium. They use them in aerospace to save weight over and have better strength than cast and milled parts. That stuff is a bit pricier, though, and would need extensive hand-finishing to match the smooth (chafe-preventing) finish of those parts.
there are some new materials that seem to be almost aluminum strength.

but i honestly think the CNC may be the way to go. theoretically i could mill siliconebronze.
 

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There are other ways around it, the easiest one would be to use turnbuckles after you're shrouds are pre-stretched. I'm doing this on an i550 sportboat, and a 26' keelboat racer replacing all the rod rigging. I've also made an emergency shroud for a J120 at a fraction of the cost of the calligo ones using low friction rings.
I'm intrigued, can you explain both the use of turnbuckles, as well as an antal ring setup for synthetic rigging?
 

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I'm intrigued, can you explain both the use of turnbuckles, as well as an antal ring setup for synthetic rigging?
Sure, the i550 is an 18 foot sportboat. The loads are not high but we wanted to keep it light weight. We're using NER product HSR STS. Heat set pre-stretched dyneema. Measure shroud, make shroud a little short, then stretch it to take out constructional stretch, then install on boat.

For cruisers you can use lashings and colligo terminals or low friction rings.


If you want to adjust your shrouds for conditions, then you should use turnbuckles. The connection from the turn buckle to the shroud should include a thimble to retain strength and prevent chafe.
 
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