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Found time to look over my old 9.8 Merc I use as a backup engine for my 20' Tolman Skiff. Mechanic had looked at it and said it would cost $500 to fix and I decided to do it myself.
Most complicated thing was to rig up fittings to go into the flush port. Then I had to build a stand for it. Found the rusted throttle cable was frozen in place so I cut it off and adjusted throttle with a screwdriver. Starts and runs fine. Fuel leak for lack of a simple hose clamp.
My total cost, about $5.00 for fittings, $6.00 for a pressure treated post (part of my stand), $1.50 for hose clamp and $29.00 for the throttle cable.
 

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It's not the parts, it's the time you pay the mechanic for. Automotive mechanics around here get about $80/hr. Marine specialists cost more.
 

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Way to go! Glad you got it fixed easily.

However, if you were fixing your neighbors outboard and charging $80-$100 per hour, what would you have had to charge, ie how many hours did the entire job take? The shops have rent, utility bills, benefits, and other expenses to pay. If you can do it yourself, its usually a money saver.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Considering that he already had the stand and knows what to look for, I'd say his total time would have been less than an hour. He already knew it wasn't frozen. I would have been happy to spend $150 and then spend another $80 to do the impeller (haven't done that yet). I woulda gone away happy and then used him for work on the 90 hp being willing to spend much more on it. Instead, he lost me as a customer and ruined his reputation with me and my friends.
Nobody expects a 40 yr old motor to run perfectly but he simply didn't want to bother and felt he could do better trying to sell me a new motor I clearly had no use for. I suspect his entire shop does nothing but warranty work.
 

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Without seeing him firsthand, I trust your take on the guy is right.

I recently had a shop quote me an entire day's labor to R&R my four injectors. They also claimed their specialist had to make a small slide hammer to remove the injectors, which could accidentally pull the sleeve out and expose the combustion chamber to coolant. They would drain the coolant first, but if the sleeve came out, it would increase the time and cost. Further, they thought there was limited room to fit the slide hammer and might have to do some "invasive carpentry". Their words.

I called Volvo, they said they sell a $75 tool for the job that is about 5 inches long and holds the sleeve in place, during removal. I have nearly a foot of clearance. Job should take a few hours.

We all have thousands of these stories, don't we.
 
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some of the tools you can buy for certain engines make all the difference in the world...honda was big on this on their motorcyle engines and you couldnt beleive how little KNOWLEADGE you had to have when using their tools

yes a but expensive for a one time use deal but if you like working on engines and things mechanical this tools pay themselves in the medium and long run

stuff like bearing pullers and retainers, shaft holders, etc..etc...etc...even a good spark plug wrench goes such a long way in making lufe easier for you and cheaper in the end

befriending a good shop and mechanic though is priceless and having a place or person to give you ideas and help for a beer or two and using them when you arent comfortable is great but unfortunately these days we all know they are few and far bewteen

peace
 

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I told a local Mercury agent in Auckland that I wanted to totally refurbish my 15hp Mercury outboard and in order the get it to look original I needed a set of the engine cowl decals. So understand what this is - just the name "Mercury" in the stylised striping in both sides of the cowl and the number "15" on the back.

This is a cut-n-paste from the e-mail I got back.

Hello

The decals for your engine will cost $443.02 incl and the part number for my reference is 37-13478a00

Let me know if you want me to order this. It is ether ex auz or America

Thanks

I said "No thanks, I don't think the motor is worth that much." I never got a response so maybe he agreed :)

So $500 to do a repair and supply parts is actually a good deal :(
 
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the decals were 440? or the work and decals?

wtf? man!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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Found time to look over my old 9.8 Merc I use as a backup engine for my 20' Tolman Skiff. Mechanic had looked at it and said it would cost $500 to fix and I decided to do it myself.
Most complicated thing was to rig up fittings to go into the flush port. Then I had to build a stand for it. Found the rusted throttle cable was frozen in place so I cut it off and adjusted throttle with a screwdriver. Starts and runs fine. Fuel leak for lack of a simple hose clamp.
My total cost, about $5.00 for fittings, $6.00 for a pressure treated post (part of my stand), $1.50 for hose clamp and $29.00 for the throttle cable.
Just throwing the money away, huh? :) That poor mechanic isn't going to have rib eye on you this week.
 

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the decals were 440? or the work and decals?

wtf? man!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Just the decal set. Oh, moderate that a bit because that is NZ$ so in US$ it's about $380.

No labor, no courier, just the decals and includes sales tax
 
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Found time to look over my old 9.8 Merc I use as a backup engine for my 20' Tolman Skiff. Mechanic had looked at it and said it would cost $500 to fix and I decided to do it myself.
First of all congratulations on your repair. Hope it stays fixed. Do us a favor and be honest about this project with us. Keep us informed about how the rest of the repair goes and how it performs in service.
I would guesstimate you have about a 80% to 90% possibility to get away this this. If I'm right and I was the mechanic that means that up to one out of every 5 jobs would be a failure. A mechanic can't make a living like that.

Those of us who work with the public size up potential customers in a few seconds. If the guy seems like the type that doesn't want to spend any money and wants it done yesterday and is going to tell me how to fix it and is going to blame me if his old piece of crap falls apart in my hands I get suddenly busy and expensive.

Their is no way I can make a living with a guy like that. I've got several guys like that that I actually like and have a a good time swapping stories with. I'll give them advice, send them to websites for discounts, do them favors for free but I will not take their money.

These are great guys and I have fun hanging out with them but since they are so much smarter than me about everything including my business it doesn't make sense for them to pay me any money.:)

Their are mechanics that are out to get you and then their are honest guys.
If I found an honest guy I would ask him what he thought the best case scenario would be. If he said best case a hose and clamp and a couple hours for $150 I would give him the $150 and the motor and make it clear he was not to spend more unless he called me. This way I would demonstrate to the "expert" that I respected his skills and time but at the same time I wanted to control my costs. It would also be clear that if the job did not turn out to be best case I was aware that I might loose the $150 and the motor will still not be fixed. My motor my risk.
 
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