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Discussion Starter #1
My little lake had quite the storm on Saturday. The airport reported 68 mph winds for over an hour. I measured two inches of rain at my house.

There are 25 boats moored on Lake Nokmois, ranging from a Capri 14 to an S2 7.3. I think my little 22 footer is the second biggest on the lake.

Anyway, three capsized and five more broke loose. The dock came off its pilings and is almost into the buoy field. One of the boats that came loose got stuck under the dock and dismasted.

My boat is fine. I'm glad I have a good mooring line with a snubber, but now I'm thinking that it might not be a bad idea to have two lines....





 

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Discussion Starter #3
Lake Nokomis. I also checked out Lake Harriet on Sunday and it had far less damage, I imagine Lake Calhoun was similar.

With 8 of 25 boats having some sort of damage, that's a 32% mortality rate. Not good...

I hope the city fixes the dock soon, it's a real hazard now. The metal pilings just under the surface of the water and very hard to see, so it's not safe to approach the dock from that side. The other side of the dock is essentially in the buoy field now, so it's hard to approach there too.
 

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Old enough to know better
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Glad to hear you boat is OK. Kind of cool to say you have the second biggest boat on the lake.

two mooring lines are not a bad thing!
 

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having been though way to many hurricanes stuff like taking off the boom could have lowered the windage enough to stop a capsize IF there was enough time to plan


having done a good amount of time on lake George NY I can fully understand how fast and violent these things can happen as at George they have air raid sirens
 

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Captain Obvious
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So your Catalina 22 survived a storm with 70 mph winds, a storm that capsized and wrecked many boats??

Another proof of the toughness of these boats.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
So your Catalina 22 survived a storm with 70 mph winds, a storm that capsized and wrecked many boats??

Another proof of the toughness of these boats.
Damn straight! I'm doing the Northwest Passage next week.

One very odd thing did happen. I can't work out what went down. One of my shrouds was disconnected, and the turnbuckle was IN THE COCKPIT.

I need to address my standing rigging, I know that, there aren't lock nuts or seizing wire or anything, but still, the turnbuckle was IN THE COCKPIT. What are the odds of the turnbuckle working loose, coming off, and landing IN THE COCKPIT.

The only thing that makes sense to me that another boat was caught in my rig and a good Samaritan undid my shroud to free the boats. I know there were some people out there during and right after the storm doing damage control.
 

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Sea Sprite 23 #110 (20)
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the wind is kinda scary at those speeds. glad your boat survived without issue.. sorry about the rest of the fleet though
 

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So your Catalina 22 survived a storm with 70 mph winds, a storm that capsized and wrecked many boats??

Another proof of the toughness of these boats.
It looks like all of the boats that went over were centerboard boats with their rig up. That makes them quite unstable.

I'd be surprised if any ballasted boat capsized in these winds.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
It looks like all of the boats that went over were centerboard boats with their rig up. That makes them quite unstable.

I'd be surprised if any ballasted boat capsized in these winds.
That is correct, it was two centerboard boats and and Melges MC that flipped. The keel boats that were damaged were damaged by coming loose and running into things (or in the case of the one that dismasted under the dock, running *under* things).
 

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I need to address my standing rigging, I know that, there aren't lock nuts or seizing wire or anything, but still, the turnbuckle was IN THE COCKPIT.
Sounds like you are lucky the mast didn't come down if a shroud was completely disconnected! And no cotter pins on the turnbuckles to prevent them from backing out? Maybe on a small boat like yours you have closed barrel type turnbuckles, but they should have nuts to lock them in place.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Sounds like you are lucky the mast didn't come down if a shroud was completely disconnected! And no cotter pins on the turnbuckles to prevent them from backing out? Maybe on a small boat like yours you have closed barrel type turnbuckles, but they should have nuts to lock them in place.
It was the main shroud that was disconnected, but the boat also has two lower shrouds per side, so there was no danger of the mast coming down.

I'm still a bit baffled by the turnbuckle being in the cockpit. It seems like if it just worked loose it would still have been attached to either the deck or the shroud. The only thing that makes sense is someone deliberately removing it to untangle another boat. There was an S2 upwind from me that came loose, but I talked to the people that rescued it from banging against a rock wall and re-tied it to a buoy, and they didn't say anything about it being caught in my boat.
 

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The only thing that makes sense is someone deliberately removing it to untangle another boat. There was an S2 upwind from me that came loose, but I talked to the people that rescued it from banging against a rock wall and re-tied it to a buoy, and they didn't say anything about it being caught in my boat.
Wind can do very very weird things. Tornadoes, for example, can often selectively destroy or modify structures when structures 10 feet away are simply untouched.
 

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It was the main shroud that was disconnected, but the boat also has two lower shrouds per side, so there was no danger of the mast coming down.
After losing an upper shroud, forestay, or backstay, the mast could very easily break in half under those circumstances.

I know a guy who last summer lost a lower shroud and his mast broke in half in the middle. This was on a relatively protected lake.

In past years I have done my first several sails without cotter pins inserted in the turnbuckles so I could do a final tune without the tedious task of removing/reinserting the cotter pins. I am a lot more careful about that now that I know someone who lost a mast. I still do my first few sails without the lower shroud pins in, but only under very gentle conditions.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
After losing an upper shroud, forestay, or backstay, the mast could very easily break in half under those circumstances.
I meant it was in no danger of coming down while tied to the mooring. I wasn't sailing with a shroud out, I noticed it right away when I got on the boat.

Actually what I noticed first was the turnbuckle on the cockpit sole. Then there was a brief scramble of WTF where did that come from! Then I noticed that a shroud was out :)




In past years I have done my first several sails without cotter pins inserted in the turnbuckles so I could do a final tune without the tedious task of removing/reinserting the cotter pins. I am a lot more careful about that now that I know someone who lost a mast. I still do my first few sails without the lower shroud pins in, but only under very gentle conditions.
I've sailed six times since I put the boat in on the 6th, a couple of those days in high winds. I guess I'm lucky! Getting the standing rigging tension right is on my list, but I suppose I should address those turnbuckles first.
 

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I meant it was in no danger of coming down while tied to the mooring. I wasn't sailing with a shroud out, I noticed it right away when I got on the boat.
Although there are more stresses when sailing, I was suggesting that even at a mooring, 68 mph winds may be enough to break the mast after a lower released.
...Actually what I noticed first was the turnbuckle on the cockpit sole. Then there was a brief scramble of WTF where did that come from! Then I noticed that a shroud was out :)
Go throw an extra turnbuckle in a buddy's cockpit sometime. Or better yet, a clevis pin. It's good for a laugh, especially if there's a race later that day. :laugher
 
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The Capri 14.2 turned upside down... I bet the owner arrives, rights the boat, and sails away! Tough little boats those 14s... Putting a ceterboard like that on a mooring though is something I wouldn't have contemplated.

I got my first "adult" boat as a 14.2. They make a keel version (as a trainer) of the 14, I've often wondered how cool it'd be to own one.

68, mph would be a lot (pronounced too much) for most centerboard boats though.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
The Capri 14.2 turned upside down... I bet the owner arrives, rights the boat, and sails away! Tough little boats those 14s... Putting a ceterboard like that on a mooring though is something I wouldn't have contemplated.
He wishes he could just sail it away! Apparently the mast is stuck good and firm in the mud and he hasn't had any luck getting it free. I went by last night and it was still inverted. The MC is still upside down too, but I don't think it's stuck, I think the owner just hasn't been by yet. I wonder if I should give it a try.

I'm in a sailing club that has several Capri 16s, and they are tough as well. Tough enough to stand up to crowds of new sailors using and abusing them. Someone did manage to break a centerboard recently trying to right one after a capsize drill, but other than that, pretty tough.
 
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